Finally, a doctor who addresses more than just treating the symptoms! Dr. Gottfried does an excellent job explaining various hormonal imbalances, why they occur, how they affect women, and provides practical solutions to fix them. She includes a comprehensive questionnaire to help you learn if you have a hormonal imbalance and what type (thyroid, high and/or low cortisol, low progesterone or estrogen, high androgens).
When these hormones misfire, your body adjusts by changing their levels, a fluctuation that ultimately slows down the metabolism, causing you to store fat every time you eat instead of using it as fuel to energize you. When your metabolism is broken, you get fatter no matter what you do—especially after age forty—and can eventually develop insulin resistance, diabetes, heart disease, and even dementia.
Understanding the science of how our bodies work is important, but personal stories from others can really help us connect and learn. “Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause” provides key information and dispels myths about menopause, while also including stories from women about their own experiences. The book’s goal is to help you become more comfortable with menopause and know your treatment options.
EPSTEIN: Yes. There was this huge optimism started in the 1920s when we figured out that insulin can help diabetics. So the thinking was, if we can change diabetes - which was a deadly disease - to a chronic illness, what else can we do? So originally the thought was, let's get growth hormone from cows just the way we got insulin from cows, and we'll give it to short kids. So the Balabans are just a remarkable couple, particularly Barbara Balaban, Jeff's mom. What happened was she went - in the 1960s - with her son. She had been told your son's too short. And she just - she's short. Her husband's short. They're not the kind of people that are just going to go out and do any sort of wacky treatment for no reason. But eventually someone said, you know, maybe you should see a doctor about this, a specialist. The specialist eventually said, your son needs growth hormone but we don't have growth hormone yet. This was the early 1960s. So if you want your son to get this treatment that we think he needs, you're going to have to collect pituitaries, which come from dead bodies, and then bring them back to us, and then we'll get the growth hormone out of it. So most people would just go home and cry and say this is impossible. And Barbara did that for about a day or two. And then she thought, you know what, her husband was a psychiatrist. He knew doctors. And through her own moxie and just drive, she became one of the world - one of the nation's largest collectors of pituitary glands, third only to the National Institutes of Health and the Veterans Administration.
When you think that all diets already exist, Valerie Childs came with a great and innovative alternative, explaining the hormones present in our body and how they interact with the food we ingest. The recipes are great and very well-documented with the exact amounts. I recommend this as a diet alternative to lose weight and balance your ingest of food.
New to this Edition: Hormones, 3rd Edition is organized with two introductory chapters followed by 15 chapters on selected topics of the molecular biology of the major endocrine systems operative in humans. Coverage, for the first time of the following hormones; ghrelin, oxyntomodulin, kisspeptin, adrenomedullin, FGF23, erythropoietin, VIP and extended coverage of NO. Coverage of the hypothalamus has been integrated with the anterior pituitary because of the intimate functional and relationship between the two. Consideration of the role of hormones in cancer has been integrated into the chapters on the relevant hormones. Each of these areas occupies a unique niche in our understanding of the biological world and is part of the universality of signaling systems and how they govern biological systems.
EPSTEIN: Yes. There was this huge optimism started in the 1920s when we figured out that insulin can help diabetics. So the thinking was, if we can change diabetes - which was a deadly disease - to a chronic illness, what else can we do? So originally the thought was, let's get growth hormone from cows just the way we got insulin from cows, and we'll give it to short kids. So the Balabans are just a remarkable couple, particularly Barbara Balaban, Jeff's mom. What happened was she went - in the 1960s - with her son. She had been told your son's too short. And she just - she's short. Her husband's short. They're not the kind of people that are just going to go out and do any sort of wacky treatment for no reason. But eventually someone said, you know, maybe you should see a doctor about this, a specialist. The specialist eventually said, your son needs growth hormone but we don't have growth hormone yet. This was the early 1960s. So if you want your son to get this treatment that we think he needs, you're going to have to collect pituitaries, which come from dead bodies, and then bring them back to us, and then we'll get the growth hormone out of it. So most people would just go home and cry and say this is impossible. And Barbara did that for about a day or two. And then she thought, you know what, her husband was a psychiatrist. He knew doctors. And through her own moxie and just drive, she became one of the world - one of the nation's largest collectors of pituitary glands, third only to the National Institutes of Health and the Veterans Administration.
I see comments saying don’t buy the kindle version. It didn’t bother me at all. I loved having a digital version that I could search through. The audio companion seemed to be for a different version though because the spoken word didn’t always match the written word. Most of the time, it didn’t matter. I only noticed a few time were it might be problematic.
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