If you’re a fan of natural herbal therapies, “New Menopausal Years” provides hundreds of remedies focused on menopause. The remedies cover menopause from start to finish. You’ll find complete descriptions of the most commonly used herbs, along with recipes for bone and heart health. The book also takes a more spiritual approach, using the voice of Grandmother Growth to guide you through your journey.
In Dr. Turner’s previous bestselling books, she taught you how to identify and solve hormonal imbalances. In The Hormone Boost, she focuses on optimizing what’s right and includes a revolutionary plan that has been proven effective for everyone, not just those experiencing symptoms of hormone disruption. With more than 60 recipes and a simple Pick-4 guide to creating meals, smoothies, and salads, the book makes getting the right balance of carbs, fat, and protein easy.
This book focuses on hormones, and on how they are produced in very diverse regions of the body in humans and animals. Hormones exhibiting the same synthesis pathways are not only found in vertebrates, but also in insects, shellfish, spiders, mollusks, and they were present evenat the time of metazoan diversification. The book discusses the different classes of hormones: protein/peptides hormones, steroids and juvenile hormones and hormones like catecholamines, thyroid hormones and melatonin. It also discusses the different types of hormone receptors, the majority of which are heptahelical G-protein coupled receptors or nuclear receptors. Particular attention is paid to the organs where hormones are synthesized, with specifics on production and release, while a dedicated chapter details hormonal regulation in systems ranging from the very simple to the highly complex. The remarkable kinetics of hormone production is also shown, and the book is rounded out by chapters on the evolution of the endocrine system, the genetics of endocrine diseases and doping.

Randi Epstein has written a fun, fast-paced medical detective story about the discovery of hormones and what they do in the body. We learn how these chemical signals regulate growth, weight, gender and sexuality, even the bonding of mother and infant. We learn what happens when there is too much of them – think of the fat lady and giant that were once paraded around at the Circus – or too little – the salt craving and exhaustion of Addison’s Disease that afflicted John F Kennedy.


Developing personal self-confidence, choosing the right doctor for you, walking out on the wrong ones with impunity and making the right choices will add up to great health care with you at the center. Follow the plan and the facts and change your life and that of your loved ones. Life is to be enjoyed not feared. This book will put enjoyment back into your life and remove the fear and intimidation from your healthcare.
Dr. Gerald Litwack obtained M.S. and PhD degrees from the University of Wisconsin Department of Biochemistry and remained there for a brief time as a Lecturer on Enzymes. Then he entered the Biochemical Institute of the Sorbonne as a Fellow of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. He next moved to Rutgers University as an Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and later as Associate Professor of biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine. After four years he moved to the Temple University School of Medicine as Professor of Biochemistry and Deputy Director of the Fels Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Biology, soon after, becoming the Laura H. Carnell Professor. Subsequently he was appointed chair of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at the Jefferson Medical College as well as Vice Dean for Research and Deputy Director of the Jefferson Cancer Institute and Director of the Institute for Apoptosis. Following the move of his family, he became a Visiting Scholar at the Department of Biological Chemistry of the Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and then became the Founding Chair of the Department of Basic Sciences at the Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, becoming Professor of Molecular and Cellular Medicine and Associate Director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at the Texas A&M Health Science Center as his final position. During his career he was a visiting scientist at the University of California, San Francisco and Berkeley, Courtauld Institute of Biochemistry, London and the Wistar Institute. He was appointed Emeritus Professor and/or Chair at Rutgers University, Thomas Jefferson University and the Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. He has published more than 300 scientific papers, authored three textbooks and edited more than sixty-five books. Currently he lives with his family and continues his authorship and editorial work in Los Angeles.
Combining a Renaissance European upbringing, American education, passion for the patient, kindness, and common sense, Dr. Erika is the founder and Medical Director of Evolved Science, a concierge medical practice in New York City focused on exceptional and respectful patient services. Dr. Schwartz received her undergraduate degree with honors from New York University and her MD from SUNY-Downstate College of Medicine, Cum Laude. She is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha honor society and past president of the Board of Managers.
Some points of criticism are that it jumps into your face that some parts are heterocentristic. Occasionally I wondered how hormones work in homosexuals as the respective gender studies were blatantly heterosexual. As the book is a lot about both sexes producing all the same hormones (just in different dosages), it would have been not far to seek an answer, for example, wether homosexual men would find pictures of women more attractive, too, (or of men) when they sniff vaginal hormones of ovulating women. Especially, since heterosexual men don't like the smell either WITHOUT the pictures. I also don't remember having read anything about such issues as male lactation, which would have been obvious in a book like this. On another topic, the term "race" for humans isn't scientific and I seriously doubt that the (West African) Dogon are "the nearest we have to representations of early humans". What about the so called San or Mbuti? Africa is a bit more diverse. Actually more diverse genetically than the entire rest of the world put together.
OBESITY IS A GROWING health concern in the United States and abroad. Recent surveys indicate that approxi- mately 30% of Americans are obese (body mass index 30), with the prevalence of obesity having increased by approx- imately 60% over the last several decades (1). Obesity is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality from a variety of health concerns including diabetes,... [Show full abstract]
To celebrate the re-release of “The Hormone Cure” and to show my gratitude for your unending support, I’m giving away Your Hormone Toolkit (my 39-page quickstart guide to hormone balance), plus my brand new Video Series + PDFs to help you quickly fix your adrenals, reverse food addiction and sugar cravings, and boost energy with proven supplements.
Meet Dr. Sara Gottfried: SARA GOTTFRIED, M.D. is the New York Times bestselling author of The Hormone Cure. After graduating from the physician-scientist training program at Harvard Medical School and MIT, Dr. Gottfried completed her residency at the University of California at San Francisco. She is a board-certified gynecologist who teaches natural hormone balancing in her novel online programs so that women can lose weight, detoxify, and feel great. Dr. Gottfried lives in Berkeley, CA with her husband and two daughters. Visit her online at www.SaraGottfriedMD.com.
As you enter perimenopause, hormone production declines significantly in the ovaries, and the adrenal glands need to pick up the slack. When menstruation ceases and we enter menopause, the ovaries stop functioning and producing hormones altogether. Our bodies were designed to handle ovarian decline with the adrenal backup system to help maintain our quality of life. Today, however, the adrenals don’t work well enough to produce the hormones we need. Our twenty-first-century lifestyle has created conditions that make it impossible for our adrenal glands to thrive (known as adrenal insufficiency). We’re left with inadequate hormones to feel, look, and function at our best.
Sometimes we can’t get all the answers from our doctors. It’s helpful to have other trustworthy and reliable sources. “What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause” was first published in 1996 and has been a bestseller since. The book focuses on hormone therapy, offering natural alternatives to help balance hormones. The latest version includes updated information based on today’s knowledge.

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In Dr. Turner’s previous bestselling books, she taught you how to identify and solve hormonal imbalances. In The Hormone Boost, she focuses on optimizing what’s right and includes a revolutionary plan that has been proven effective for everyone, not just those experiencing symptoms of hormone disruption. With more than 60 recipes and a simple Pick-4 guide to creating meals, smoothies, and salads, the book makes getting the right balance of carbs, fat, and protein easy.
A must-read for all women, Dr. Gottfried is brilliant, relatable and tells it like it is. Even women in their 20s can benefit from the wisdom here about how to listen to our bodies and address imbalances (stress, low sex drive, acne, etc) in a natural way without running straight to pills or prescriptions. What I love about this book is the way Gottfried absolves women of what many feel might be personal shortcomings or genetic life-sentences: Am I doomed to have low sex drive forever? Will I al ...more
Some points of criticism are that it jumps into your face that some parts are heterocentristic. Occasionally I wondered how hormones work in homosexuals as the respective gender studies were blatantly heterosexual. As the book is a lot about both sexes producing all the same hormones (just in different dosages), it would have been not far to seek an answer, for example, wether homosexual men would find pictures of women more attractive, too, (or of men) when they sniff vaginal hormones of ovulating women. Especially, since heterosexual men don't like the smell either WITHOUT the pictures. I also don't remember having read anything about such issues as male lactation, which would have been obvious in a book like this. On another topic, the term "race" for humans isn't scientific and I seriously doubt that the (West African) Dogon are "the nearest we have to representations of early humans". What about the so called San or Mbuti? Africa is a bit more diverse. Actually more diverse genetically than the entire rest of the world put together.
The concept of eating your carbs early in the day, with the intention that you will have a better chance of burning them off, could actually be setting you up for cravings all day long. Eating a starchy carb, like potatoes or beans early in the day will cause more cravings later in the day, so I suggest you only eat one carb in your last meal. Eating carbs later in the day is proven to raise our serotonin levels, a "feel-good chemical" in our brain, which helps us sleep, and sleep is one of the most important fat-burning activities.
This is yet another diet that tells people to avoid things that can have serious long-term health effects, such as processed foods and sugars. The hormone diet’s focus on natural, healthy foods as well as both cardiovascular and strength training exercises makes a great addition to any lifestyle. Even without following the hormone diet specifically, eating healthy foods and getting regular exercise will help you lose weight not only in the immediate future, but for the long haul as well. Though phase 1 has many food rules, it doesn’t necessarily classify as an extreme detox program. It can be viewed more as a clean-eating plan since many whole, fresh, nutrient-dense foods are encouraged.

Dr. Henry was awarded a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Research Career Development Award in 1977. She received the Fuller Albright Award from the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research in 1984 and has served this Society as a member of the Council and several Scientific Program Committees. Dr. Henry has been a member of the NIH General Medicine B Study Section (1989-1993) and the National Science Foundation Panel on Integrative Biology (1994-1996). She has served on the editorial boards of several scientific journals, including Endocrinology, American Journal of Physiology, and the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. She is currently a member of the Endocrine Society, the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, and the American Institute of Nutritional Sciences.


I gain weight way too easily (diabetes runs in my family as does poor stress resilience), so I’m strategic with my food plan. I eat foods that stabilize my blood sugar and don’t cause high cortisol if you’re intolerant like me – that includes amping up fiber and avoiding gluten. I choose foods and drinks that are high in nutrient density, with broad diversity of species so that my microbiome is happy. I have hypothyroidism, or a slow thyroid, so I try my best to avoid raw goitrogens like cruciferous vegetables and soy. I still eat broccoli, kale, collards, cauliflower, etc. but I lightly steam them to inactivate most of the goitrogens. I like tempeh, a fermented form of whole soy, but chose the types that are not combined with grains. You’ll find a lot of fermented vegetables on my meal plan because they are nature’s probiotic and help you reset your insulin so that you don’t store fat at your belly and raise your blood sugar unnecessarily. I eat low-mercury, wild-caught fish almost daily because it keeps my fatty acids in balance. I have a gene called PPARG that keeps my weight down if I eat more fish than meat, so you’ll find a lot of salmon, halibut, cod, and steelhead trout on the menu.
Based on twenty hormone-supporting superfoods and twenty hormone-supporting super herbs—with modifications for Paleo, Paleo for Autoimmunity (AIP), anti-Candida, and low-FODMAP diets—these healing recipes include a terrific selection for everyday meals, from Sweet Potato and Sage Pancakes and Honey Glazed Tarragon Chicken to a Decadent Chocolate Cherry Smoothie.
I start my day with a steamy mug of green tea. My current favorite is genmaicha, a combination of green tea and brown rice. I steep organic loose tea for 4 minutes and then add a fresh squeeze of Meyer lemon. Occasionally, I’ll whip up matcha tea, but most days that feels way too high maintenance. I encourage my patients to replace their coffee with tea to decrease the amount of caffeine they are drinking, which can make you feel stressed or disrupt your sleep if you metabolize caffeine slowly like I do (along with 51% of Americans).

No matter how an imbalance manifests on the outside, the internal reality remains the same: Any and all hormonal imbalances lead to difficulty losing weight and increased risk of obesity. To determine if your hormones are balanced, try asking yourself a few questions: Do you have trouble dragging yourself out of bed in the morning? Do you experience uncontrollable sugar cravings at 3 p.m.? Nagging PMS every month? Interrupted sleep patterns? Do you get stressed out just sitting in your office? Do you have difficulty coping with every task? Bloating after meals? Skin that has lost its luster or tone? Belly fat that just won’t go away? The list can go on and on, and I am willing to bet that many of you experience some of these frustrations every day. Believe it or not, these factors aren’t just making you feel bad, they may be impacting your ability to lose weight because they are all sure signs your hormones are out of whack! 
Brimming with fascinating anecdotes, illuminating new medical research, and humorous details, Aroused introduces the leading scientists who made life-changing discoveries about the hormone imbalances that ail us, as well as the charlatans who used those discoveries to peddle false remedies. Epstein exposes the humanity at the heart of hormone science with her rich cast of characters, including a 1920s doctor promoting vasectomies as a way to boost libido, a female medical student who discovered a pregnancy hormone in the 1940s, and a mother who collected pituitaries, a brain gland, from cadavers as a source of growth hormone to treat her son. Along the way, Epstein explores the functions of hormones such as leptin, oxytocin, estrogen, and testosterone, demystifying the science of endocrinology.
Low Testosterone: Testosterone enhances libido, bone density, muscle mass, strength, motivation, memory, fat burning and skin tone in both men and women. An increase of body fat and loss of muscle may happen, even with dieting and exercise, when testosterone is low. Testosterone levels tend to taper off with aging, obesity and stress, but today men are experiencing testosterone decline much earlier in life. This is quite an alarming finding, considering low testosterone has been linked to depression, obesity, osteoporosis, heart disease and even death. Dr. Mitchell Harman, an endocrinologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, blames the proliferation of endocrine-suppressing estrogen-like com£ds used in pesticides and other farming chemicals for the downward trend in male testosterone levels. Phthalates, commonly found in cosmetics, soaps and most plastics, are another known cause of testosterone suppression.
It's an easy to understand book, with very practical solutions to balancing hormones. Dr. Gottfried recommends lifestyle changes and supplements before attempting pharmaceutical solutions. I really like that approach. That said, it's difficult to self-diagnose using just her questionnaires. As she explains, if your root cause is low progesterone, it can cause excess estrogen in parts of your cycle. You could be treating high estrogen, when the root cause is low progesterone. Without testing, you ...more
It is little-known that hormones play a crucial ongoing role in our most vital bodily functions. I see countless patients whose busy lives leave them feeling depleted, burnt out and looking for answers. They do not want an extreme approach – nor do they need one. They usually need a reset and to balance their hormones. This 4-week plan outlines nutritional and lifestyle changes to help get your life and your hormones back on track.
androgen Dihydrotestosterone DHT multiple AR 5-DHT or DHT is a male reproductive hormone that targets the prostate gland, bulbourethral gland, seminal vesicles, penis and scrotum and promotes growth/mitosis/cell maturation and differentiation. Testosterone is converted to 5-DHT by 5alpha-reductase, usually with in the target tissues of 5-DHT because of the need for high concentrations of 5-dht to produce the physiological effects.
Conservative cardio workouts are also recommended – about four times a week for 30 minutes. The idea is not to overdo it, since excessive calories combined with overexercising only increase the negative effect on a thyroid hormone deficiency, which slows down metabolism. Interval training is recommended over long endurance training. So exercise gently, and gradually make strength training part of your routine, which will maintain the muscle that you are building.

I feel the diet is also very misleading. Dr. Gottfried gives you 7 resets that are supposed to last for 3 days each, but that's not exactly true. Reset 1 is meatless (estrogen reset); Reset 2 is sugar free (insulin); Reset 3 is fruitless (leptin); Reset 4 is caffeine free (cortisol); Reset 5 is Grain Free (thyroid); Reset 6 is dairy free (growth hormone); Reset 7 is toxin free (testosterone). The truth is you are eliminating red meat, alcohol, sugar, fruit, caffeine, grains, dairy and toxins for the entire 21 days. Take a look at the menu she gives you on day 1, the meatless menu:


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As much as many North Americans have a hormone imbalance, just as many have a certain degree of adrenal fatigue. That degree can vary from a small touch of adrenal fatigue to full-on, “barely even functioning” adrenal fatigue. While I don’t follow this diet, I do continue to cycle carbs and have had such a change in my overall health since implementing that type of lifestyle. This is the book that truly changed the way I thought about exercise, and cardio specifically. Sara’s books also touch on the best types of exercise and between the two I’ve drastically changed both my own workout regimes, but also those of my clients.
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