Written by a Naturopathic Doctor, this book is such an excellent resource for learning about the hormones in our body and what happens when they are out of balance. I found it extremely fascinating and helpful to get the background and explanations on which hormones will pack on weight and which ones will help to lose weight and the things we can do to have optimal health.
I am a bodybuilder and I bought this book to learn about how to get my hormones in a good place. Lifting weights has a huge impact on not just the muscles but also the hormone levels in the body and If you are not careful you can end up with adrenal fatigue (when your adrenal glands are worn out) I am very excited to see how using this diet works for me. It looks like it is based on good principles and should help with muscle gain, I will keep you posted
Stephanie is a typical high achieving young woman. Working at an advertising agency as a creative director, she’s often the first to arrive at the office. The job is demanding, but she enjoys pushing projects to the finishing line and is a self-described A-type personality. But it played havoc with her cortisol and insulin levels. Check out her story here:
Many women in perimenopause or menopause complain of “foggy brain”—and low progesterone is the troublemaker. It also causes sleep problems that worsen brain fog. Brain fog is characterized by slower processing time and difficulty finding the words you’re looking for. You might be unable to retrieve the name of a coworker and have to sit down and think of it. You pull out your iPhone to make an appointment with the dentist, and find that it takes a minute to recall his name. A patient of mine, a fifty-four-year-old flight attendant, was telling a story to friends on her way to work, and couldn’t retrieve the name of the Irish holiday where there’s a parade and everyone dresses up in green. It took her a day to figure out that the holiday was St. Patrick’s Day.
Tami Meraglia, MD, known as “Dr. Tami” to her patients and fans, is double board certified in integrative and natural medicine and aesthetic medicine. She is the medical director of the Vitality Medical Clinic in Seattle, Washington and serves on the advisory board of Douglas Labs, one of the largest medical grade nutraceutical companies in the United States, where she contributes to research and education.
This part of the diet involves a two-week “detoxification” process. You avoid eating gluten-containing grains, dairy products made from cow’s milk, many oils, alcohol, caffeine, peanuts, sugar, artificial sweeteners, red meat, and citrus fruits. Acceptable foods during this phase include naturally gluten-free grains and starches, most vegetables, most fruits, beans, nuts and seeds, poultry, fish, soy, eggs, plant milks, dairy from sheep or goat, and certain oils. This phase also involves taking nutritional supplements. These include probiotics and anti-inflammatory products like turmeric and fish oil.
To celebrate the re-release of “The Hormone Cure” and to show my gratitude for your unending support, I’m giving away Your Hormone Toolkit (my 39-page quickstart guide to hormone balance), plus my brand new Video Series + PDFs to help you quickly fix your adrenals, reverse food addiction and sugar cravings, and boost energy with proven supplements.
If there’s a woman who’s satisfied with her weight and body firmness as she gets older, I haven’t met her. Yet testosterone can make an enormous and surprising difference in both. Take Mary, a thirty-nine-year-old stay-at-home mom and the wife of a construction manager. Her kids were in school, which left her time to enjoy going to the gym and playing tennis. Despite this active lifestyle and a slim body, Mary came to see me about how she could tighten her arms. She was fit, but unhappy that no matter how hard she worked on her arms she couldn’t firm them up. “I’ve stopped wearing sleeveless tops and dresses,” she told me. “I need laser treatment.”
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This is a new revolution in weight loss called "intermittent fasting." Studies have clearly shown that our body responds to the fasting by boosting growth hormone, the hormone that helps build muscle. It involves the avoidance of food intake for one day per week. Now this might seem to counter my viewpoint on cutting calories, but if done properly it will not cause muscle deterioration and can actually help greatly in the treatment of chronic pain and metabolic syndromes.  During your cleanse day you should drink at least 4 liters of warm or cold herbal teas to support the cleansing process. I recommend a combination of herbs with anti-inflammatory and diuretic benefits such as ginger, lemon, blueberry, hibiscus, dandelion, green tea and parsley.  You can consume one or two hard-boiled eggs in the morning or a serving of nuts in the afternoon if you feel overly hungry. 

“If you’re struggling with weight and not sure where to start, look no more. The Hormone Boost, makes weight loss both understandable and doable. You’ll discover how to make each meal the right balance of protein, carbs, and fats and a blueprint with simple steps to prep your home and body. It’s the first weight loss book to address the SUM of you, not just SOME of you.” Dr. Mache Seibel, MD, bestselling author of The Estrogen Window and faculty member, Harvard Medical School

Dining out won’t be a problem under the Supercharged Hormone Diet. Eating out is not difficult on this diet because it essentially mirrors the Mediterranean diet – so ordering chicken and fish-based entrees and plenty of salads is fair game. You are also advised to have one meal a week that is a "cheat meal," which allows you to eat the foods you cut out.

When it comes to weight loss, most people don’t think about hormones. But when you develop resistance to your seven major metabolic hormones—cortisol, thyroid, testosterone, growth hormone, leptin, insulin, and estrogen—your body adjusts by increasingly raising your hormone levels and ultimately slowing down your metabolism. And a slower metabolism leads to weight gain and difficulty losing weight. The solution, Dr. Sara Gottfried contends, is to reset the efficiency of your hormones by repairing and growing new hormone receptors.

... They can be transported to distant organs to regulate physiology and behavior via the circulatory system. The biosynthesis and secretion of hormones are regulated by other hormones, plasma concentrations of ions or nutrients, neurons and mental activity, and environmental changes [41]. Changes in hormone concentrations can also reflect the state of homeostasis [42]. ...
"This book is an extraordinary textbook describing the biochemistry, physiology, cell biology, and molecular biology of hormones... The book is written primarily for graduate students in biochemistry and first year medical students of endocrinology, but it will be invaluable to clinicians wishing to understand the pathogenesis of endocrine disorders as well as researchers in the field of endocrinology... [The book displays] uniform style and consistently high quality and clarity among chapters with no repetition of material... This second edition comes 11 years after the first edition and is as up-to-date as textbooks can get. I would recommend the use of this textbook in all medical school courses in endocrinology and it should at least be available on the bookshelves of all medical school libraries, clinicians, and researchers of hormones." --Roy E. Weiss, MD, PhD, University of Chicago Medical Center, for DOODY'S PUBLISHING REVIEWS
I think there is a lot of value in understanding the role hormones play with our mood, but I got really turned off of Dr. Gottfried's whole thing when one of her emails encouraged me to buy her protein powder stuff. What?! She's very much into her own branding, and that turned me off. I did get some insight by taking the online quiz and by skimming parts of this book.
When women hit 40+, they often gain weight (particularly around the midsection), become more sluggish, and begin thinking they can’t possibly look and feel the way they did in their twenties or thirties. Instead, they start disrespecting their bodies and, in turn, make poor decisions (i.e., choosing cookies over kale; pouring one too many glasses of red wine at dinner, etc.) These poor decisions snowball into misfiring hormones and a broken metabolism.
"This book is an extraordinary textbook describing the biochemistry, physiology, cell biology, and molecular biology of hormones... The book is written primarily for graduate students in biochemistry and first year medical students of endocrinology, but it will be invaluable to clinicians wishing to understand the pathogenesis of endocrine disorders as well as researchers in the field of endocrinology... [The book displays] uniform style and consistently high quality and clarity among chapters with no repetition of material... This second edition comes 11 years after the first edition and is as up-to-date as textbooks can get. I would recommend the use of this textbook in all medical school courses in endocrinology and it should at least be available on the bookshelves of all medical school libraries, clinicians, and researchers of hormones." --Roy E. Weiss, MD, PhD, University of Chicago Medical Center, for DOODY'S PUBLISHING REVIEWS

The newly revised and updated Hormones, Second Edition provides a comprehensive treatment of human hormones, viewed in light of modern theories of hormone action and in the context of current understanding of subcellular and cellular architecture and classical organ physiology. Each chapter presents a physiological description of the hormone system under consideration, followed by a listing of the mode-of-action of the hormone. This book includes significant advances in the molecular biology of receptors, hormones, and studies of hormone action that have transpired over the past five years. The text updates the material on enzymes related to steroid metabolism and new hormone systems, as well as providing a new chapter on hormones and cancer.
You may never think of stroke. You may not think you’re at risk, that it’s a problem that occurs in older people, like grandparents. Certainly, it’s not a health risk for you. Turns out that strokes are on the rise among millennials. According to the Centers for Disease Control, strokes among women ages eighteen to thirty-four have increased 32 percent from 2003 to … [Read More...]
I avoid eating at restaurants as much as possible because of “Restaurant Syndrome” – the phenomenon of overeating in response to the convivial atmosphere, drinking alcohol and less inhibition, the yummy sights and smells, and large serving sizes – all of which contribute to a documented increased risk of blood sugar problems and weight gain. In fact, in a study of 99,000 men and women followed over 30 years, people who average two homemade meals per day have a 13% lower chance of diabetes than people who have fewer than six homemade meals per week.1 You lose weight over time, because out-of-home eating is associated with becoming overweight and obesity.2 When you dine with friends and are distracted, you eat as much as 35 percent more.3 Yes, it sucks. The carbs and industrial seed oils, gluten, dairy, and additives make it tough on the body to reduce inflammation, and it can show up in your skin and bathroom scale. So when I’m on the road, I take my food with me in a cute glass container when I need to eat outside my home.

I gain weight way too easily (diabetes runs in my family as does poor stress resilience), so I’m strategic with my food plan. I eat foods that stabilize my blood sugar and don’t cause high cortisol if you’re intolerant like me – that includes amping up fiber and avoiding gluten. I choose foods and drinks that are high in nutrient density, with broad diversity of species so that my microbiome is happy. I have hypothyroidism, or a slow thyroid, so I try my best to avoid raw goitrogens like cruciferous vegetables and soy. I still eat broccoli, kale, collards, cauliflower, etc. but I lightly steam them to inactivate most of the goitrogens. I like tempeh, a fermented form of whole soy, but chose the types that are not combined with grains. You’ll find a lot of fermented vegetables on my meal plan because they are nature’s probiotic and help you reset your insulin so that you don’t store fat at your belly and raise your blood sugar unnecessarily. I eat low-mercury, wild-caught fish almost daily because it keeps my fatty acids in balance. I have a gene called PPARG that keeps my weight down if I eat more fish than meat, so you’ll find a lot of salmon, halibut, cod, and steelhead trout on the menu.


"Gottfried, a beautiful Harvard Medical School graduate, board-certified gynecologist, and yoga teacher, looks like an advertisement for healthy living and convincingly pushes women to make lifestyle changes rather than immediately asking for conventional prescription drugs to treat problems such as depression. Most of her tips are solid and helpful...A valuable title."
Dr. Henry’s laboratory has made major contributions to the understanding of vitamin D metabolism, particularly regulation of the production of the active vitamin D hormone by the kidney. She pioneered the use of cell culture systems to study renal vitamin D metabolism. A related area of research focus is the regulation of gene expression in the kidney by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. In addition to peer-reviewed research articles, Dr. Henry has authored chapters for the books Vitamin D and Handbook of Physiology, as well as the chapter on “Vitamin D Metabolism” for this Encyclopedia.
EPSTEIN: We're on the cusp of really understanding hormones and behavior. So one of the more recent findings is hunger and hormones. Among people that have a rare hormone defect that they cannot stop eating, there are some drugs in the pipeline that takes away this compulsion to eat. The fascinating thing in terms of basic science and understanding our bodies is it's not hormones and obesity here. It's not so much that you have a mucked up metabolism that you gain weight easily. It's that because of your hormone defect, you feel compelled to keep eating. So a lot of the doctors that are unraveling that basic science are saying, well, now we're at this cusp of trying to see what other behaviors can we link to hormones or hormones gone awry.
"Gottfried, a beautiful Harvard Medical School graduate, board-certified gynecologist, and yoga teacher, looks like an advertisement for healthy living and convincingly pushes women to make lifestyle changes rather than immediately asking for conventional prescription drugs to treat problems such as depression. Most of her tips are solid and helpful...A valuable title." (Booklist)
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