The good news: There are things you can do. For many the answer lies in natural herbs and supplements, like black cohosh and red clover. Though medical studies remain conflicted over the effectiveness of these remedies, some women report relief. And while HRT was found to have a laundry list of nasty side effects, Goldstein says that for some women, short term use can still be the appropriate answer, particularly for hot flashes.

I had a total hysterectomy at 36. I’m now 40. I was on the patch felt terrible all the time. Started the hormone pellet therapy and felt better. Every time I go for labs my estrogen is high and my testosterone is high. I have noticed increased belly fat, aging skin, cellulite, tired all the time, irritable, etc etc. I don’t know what to do will stopping all the hormones age me faster. I don’t want to be all wrinkled and saggy at 40! Any advice would be great! Thank you.
Read on for some of the most common things that can happen when your hormones are not in balance.  Some of these hormonal imbalances can diagnosed by clinical symptoms or after a physical exam; others require simple blood tests. But remember, there could be reasons other than hormones for these conditions, so always check with your health care professional to explore other causes and rule out other problems.   

There are many types of hormones in the body. Some play key roles in the everyday health and well-being of women, including estrogen, testosterone and progesterone that come from the ovaries. Other hormones include, but are not limited to, thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland, cortisol from the adrenal gland and prolactin from the pituitary gland. When they're in balance, our bodies run smoothly. 
Strength training is your best friend when trying to boost testosterone! Magnesium is also a true testosterone booster. So make sure to eat plenty of dark leafy greens (spinach, swiss chard, kale, watercress and collard greens), pumpkin seeds, fish (mackerel, pollock, turbot and tuna are excellent!), avocado, unroasted nuts (Brasil, almonds, cashews, pecans and walnuts), bananas, and dark chocolate.
Hormonal balance is vital to a healthy, cancer-free mind and body, but can be disrupted in many ways. Hormone fluctuations occur naturally, such as in puberty, menopause and perimenopause. Hormone imbalance may also be caused by toxins or an unbalanced lifestyle. Understanding the causes of hormone imbalance empowers us to prevent them, and at the same time, feel better, think better, and better prevent breast cancer.

The content of this website is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any medical condition, nor should it be used as a substitute for medical advice from a qualified physician. The information contained herein is presented in summary form only. It should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice from a physician. Only a qualified physician can determine if you qualify for treatment.
Hi, I have a few questions. I am 20 yrs old and for the last 6 months my body has been completely changing and I’m not sure why. When I was 12 I started taking the birth control pill, I never had any issues, my period was always very light. When I turned 14 I became pregnant and had my daughter when I was 15. After I had her I got the depo shot. I never had my period. After about a year and a half I started to get really bad migraines to the point I couldn’t go a day without taking 4 excedrin. It got so bad I would get sick to my stomach. I then got the implant. I had that for a year and then all of a sudden I got my period every day for 3 months straight and my hair started to fall out. I haven’t been on any birth control for about a year. My period became pretty normal. But recently, about 5 months ago I took a plan b pill which made my period worse. I was sick for 3 days and constantly had headaches again. My period would be so heavy and I had the worst stomach pains. About a month after that I tried to get back on the pill. I took it for a week but started feeling nauses all the time. So I stopped taking it. Now within the last couple months I have gained and lost so much weight I’ve had to go back and forth buying different size Jeans and bras. My boobs have gone up a whole cup size, I went from a size 9 jeans, to a 1, and now I’m just in a 5. I’m not gaining any weight in my stomach or side area. Only up top and lower. I’ve been experiencing all of these symptoms, hot flashes, cold hands and feet, sleeping to much or not enough. My mood swings are all over the place. I space out all the time forgetting little things, mainly when driving I tend to lose focus and forget where I’m going or that I’m even driving. Any time I have sex I get a horrible pain that I can’t take to keep going and start to bleed right after. My periods are so unpredictable. I’ll get it for one day and it wont come back for a week. Its always heavy too. My body had been cramping and hurting so much more. Constantly cracking or feeling stiff. I’ve been getting migraines again. And just lost all motivation to do anything. I struggle with going to see my daughter when I get off work. I just haven’t been feeling myself. I know stress and change of life style is a big part of this. But honestly I thought things were getting better. I never ate right before all of this, my life went completely down hill in the worst ways. But within the last year everything has been going good. Compared to before. I’ve been eating healthier, I’m in a great relationship. I’ve been working the same job for the last 3 years. My boyfriend and I just bought our first house. Therefore I cant say I had any major stress or depression issues again until I started noticing these changes in my body. So basically is there any thing you can think of to why my body would be acting this way? Could it be because of not taking birth control since I was for so long. Or because I’ve tried so many different ones and none of them did any good for my body? It’s really been getting the best of me, physically and mentally.
After removing the bad stuff, you will want to replace it with good stuff. Eat a whole, real, unprocessed, organic, mostly plant-based diet with organic or sustainably raised animal products. When you focus on this type of diet, you minimize intake of xenoestrogens, hormones, and antibiotics. Taking simple steps like choosing organic food and drinking filtered water can hugely impact hormone balance.
Although it was many years ago, I still remember one of the first patients I saw with a hormonal disturbance. She was a lovely woman in her early 40s who was a little heavy; despite having tried every diet under the sun, she couldn't seem to shed the extra pounds. As we talked and she mentioned a few more of her concerns—dry skin, brittle hair, a lack of energy (even shortly after her morning coffee)—I realized I needed to test her thyroid levels. Sure enough, they were too low. With proper medication, my patient's skin and energy improved, and she was no longer a prisoner to a simple chemical imbalance.

Breast cancer is a major concern for women of all ages. As we have discussed, excess estrogens may act as initiators of cancer or as promoters of cancer cell growth. There are concerns too about a surplus of estrogen metabolites such as estrone sulphate, the stored form of estrogen in the body, contributing to the overall estrogen burden and the growth of breast tumors. However, not all hormones are equivalent when it comes to breast cancer risk. Estriol, the weakest estrogen may have a protective effect against breast cancer. If we follow natural physiology, and the growing number of studies attesting to its protective benefits, bioidentical vs. synthetic progestin may also help to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer via its balancing effects on estrogen.


Insulin resistance is linked with many health problems, Type II diabetes, being the most commonly known, but it also leads to an increased risk of breast cancer. Insulin is a growth factor and as we eat more and more carbohydrates and sweets, it rises, and as it does it increases IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor) which stimulates cancer cells. A 2004 study out of Vanderbilt University suggests that insulin resistance and increased IGF-1 synergistically increase the risk for breast cancer. The study found that women with abnormal levels of both had a three-fold rise in the incidence of breast cancer. Two years earlier, Dr. Pamela Goodwin of Mt. Sinai Hospital in Toronto found that women with early stage breast cancer, who were also insulin resistant (as defined by a high fasting insulin level) had a higher rate of cancer spreading to other organs (metastases), and death, compared to those whose insulin levels were normal. Type 2 diabetes, which is essentially advanced insulin resistance, leads to breast cancer—the long-running Nurses Health Study of over 100,000 nurses bears this out. Although some studies have questioned these findings, a combined analysis of 21 studies published in 2004, backs up the trend.
But when you suspect hormone imbalance, mainstream medicine typically runs only basic labs. If your labs don’t come back “normal,” you’re typically given a synthetic hormone cream or pill that could have side effects. If those labs come back “normal” and you’re still experiencing symptoms, you may be told you’re either depressed, just getting older, or need to lose weight.
I am so tired it’s awful. I am in a stressful situation and I am cold a lot also. I use low dose vaginal progesterone and half a mg. of divigel, I work out and my cortisol is high I think. I try increasing progesterone but get tired on it. Now my breasts are bigger and I am bloated all over. My doctor doesn’t help. I think I have high and low cortisol and I feel like I will never recover from this, help!

Fatigue is a common symptom that may have many potential underlying causes. Just as too little progesterone can make it hard to sleep, too much progesterone can make you more tired. Another common hormonal imbalance that causes fatigue is low thyroid hormone levels (hypothyroidism). This condition is easily diagnosed with a blood test. If your levels are low, you can take prescription medication to bring your levels back up to normal. Regardless of any hormone imbalance that may exist, practice good sleep hygiene to optimize your sleep. This involves going to bed and waking up at the same time every day, even on the weekends. Avoid alcohol, caffeine, and exercise from the late afternoon on to avoid interfering with sleep. Establish a relaxing nighttime routine to give your body the message that it's time for sleep. Take a warm bath, sip a cup of chamomile tea, or listen to relaxing music.


Deborah: Welcome back. Our next guest was at the end of her rope. She was tired all the time, had muscle aches and was in a fog. To how many of you does that sound familiar? After years of doctors visits, she still didn’t feel any better until now. Please welcome Wendy Walsh and the man who got to the bottom of her health issues, Dr. Steven Hotze, with the Hotze Health & Wellness Center. He’s also the author of the book Hormones, Health, and Happiness.
Get a lot of natural light during the day, and spend at least 30 minutes outside each day if possible. The wide-spectrum of natural lighting helps boost serotonin levels which balance melatonin levels at night. In fact, my doctor routinely recommends that his patients get 30 minutes of sunlight or bright light within an hour of waking when they are working to balance hormones.
Was diagnosed of hyperthyroidism 2013 was on thyroid medication, 2014 i had a radioactive iodine months after I became hypothyroid and have being on levothyrosine as I was told I would take it for life,I didn’t have it for a week in April as I wanted to try fruits so I had a breakdown,with emotional issues in my relationship, lots of thinking and crying, stressed out and depressed, hotness in my head ad legs,then I ran a thyroid test t3 low,t4 low,the extremely high I’m back on my medication but still feel horrible, lack of interest, hotness… Symptoms of hormone imbalance. What can I do please, I’m losing it
Hi, I am a guy in my late 40’s, having a red rash on my face, thining hair and alopicia spot on the back of my head, was bald spot now growing back white, I get bumps on the back of my neck bordering the hair line, muscle soreness in my bicepts and tricepts, I was a late blooomer, I was 5’8″ when I was 19, and stopped growing at 25. I was never really hairy, but I am getting hairy legs, chest,and arms also. I have been back and forth between sleeping too much, and not sleeping for a couple of days – during the sleepless times my libido spikes like I am a teenager, but I also have headaches and brain fog (especilly inside my home and at the office), and I also feel confusion and I am forgetful. About a year ago I had a what I thought was a stroke, but I was told it was a panic attack – I litterally lost my memoty, it was hard to deal with, some memories are gone, l am not the same person, as before the attack. I can look at mathematical question and just know the answers, I am really calm and organized – and I no longer drink alcohol, not the me I used to be. I am heavily weighted on the IQ side as opposed to the EQ side. I have had constipation for weeks,then normal. I almost ner feel hungry, and have been loosin weight. I get pins and needles im lgs and hands, and have had anumb and sometimes painful spot in my left abdomin. It seems like I am all over the place, I have been cutting carbs and processed foods from my diet, and just want to stabilize.I often feel like I have been drugged. My wife and I have been separated, I think for good. I became a longdistance swimmer from 42, and I am trying to manage endophins also.
Your Parsley Health team can help you to understand and resolve these imbalances.  Hormone management is a delicate, imprecise and sophisticated matter.  Remember the analogy of the game of chess.  Moving certain pieces changes the whole board, some more than others.  Some moves can be really big game changers.  And some moves can really get you into trouble.  Be sure you are working with an expert in the game.

Hi. I feel like I’m losing my mind. I’m 43 and until 18 months ago lived a normal,happy, confident life. Due to a couple of bereavements I had a breakdown and all my issues regarding death and aging came flooding out. I’ve been on antidepressants ever since but I seem to be in this cycle of feeling ok then crashing through the floor around ovulation time. I can never feel well for long periods of time. I’m not sure whether I’m pre menopausal or what is going on. I’ve tried so many different therapies (counsellor type stuff) and spent so much money I’m just not sure I can go on like this. I’m not suicidal as I’m terrified of death but I feel totally joyless in my life which is so totally unlike how I was before. Please help if you can. Many thanks.
"Medically speaking, anything that occurs right before your period - such as cramps, diarrhea, and breast tenderness - is considered pre-menstrual syndrome," says Steven R. Goldstein, MD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at NYU Medical Center in New York City. But for most women it's the mood issues that become the defining factor for what we know as PMS." And, says Goldstein, this can include anything from mild to moderate depression, anxiety, mood swings, melancholia, sensitivity, even full-blown anger and self-hatred.

Phytoestrogenic. (e.g., black cohosh) These herbs contain estrogenic components produced by plants. These herbs, at first, do treat the hormonal imbalance by introducing these plant-based estrogens into the body. However, as a result of adding outside hormones, a woman's body may become less capable of producing estrogen on its own. This causes a further decrease of the body's own hormone levels.
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
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