I am 35 years old and for the past 2-months have had a somewhat irregular cycle. In May my period came twice, and 3-weeks later was back in June. Although I have experienced anxiety in the past, I was have always been able to get myself out of it with cognitive behavioral skills. This time around, I have anxiety, but it’s not consistent. I go from one day feeling normal and optimistic, to feeling dread the next. I also notice a week prior to my period I get more of the dread fear emotions, and during my period I’m fine. Then the anxiety comes back during ovulation for a day or two and then it’s back to feeling normal again. A day or two prior to my period, I lose sleep and get very hot and anxious at night. Yes life has been stressful the past months and simply thought that was the case, “I broke”, but starting to think it’s hormonal. I had been on Mirena for 5 years and last year was pregnant. I’ve been birth control free for 10 months after giving birth. Would love the advise!

A lack of sleep, long-term use of corticosteroids and chronic stress are three of the biggest contributors to high cortisol levels. A report published in the Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism stated that “Stress can lead to changes in the serum level of many hormones including glucocorticoids, catecholamines, growth hormone and prolactin.” (19)
Your gut is lined with tiny cells called receptors that respond to estrogen and progesterone. When these hormones are higher or lower than usual, you might notice changes in how you're digesting food. That’s why diarrhea, stomach pain, bloating, and nausea can crop up or get worse before and during your period. If you’re having digestive woes as well as issues like acne and fatigue, your hormone levels might be off.
Hi, I have a few questions. I am 20 yrs old and for the last 6 months my body has been completely changing and I’m not sure why. When I was 12 I started taking the birth control pill, I never had any issues, my period was always very light. When I turned 14 I became pregnant and had my daughter when I was 15. After I had her I got the depo shot. I never had my period. After about a year and a half I started to get really bad migraines to the point I couldn’t go a day without taking 4 excedrin. It got so bad I would get sick to my stomach. I then got the implant. I had that for a year and then all of a sudden I got my period every day for 3 months straight and my hair started to fall out. I haven’t been on any birth control for about a year. My period became pretty normal. But recently, about 5 months ago I took a plan b pill which made my period worse. I was sick for 3 days and constantly had headaches again. My period would be so heavy and I had the worst stomach pains. About a month after that I tried to get back on the pill. I took it for a week but started feeling nauses all the time. So I stopped taking it. Now within the last couple months I have gained and lost so much weight I’ve had to go back and forth buying different size Jeans and bras. My boobs have gone up a whole cup size, I went from a size 9 jeans, to a 1, and now I’m just in a 5. I’m not gaining any weight in my stomach or side area. Only up top and lower. I’ve been experiencing all of these symptoms, hot flashes, cold hands and feet, sleeping to much or not enough. My mood swings are all over the place. I space out all the time forgetting little things, mainly when driving I tend to lose focus and forget where I’m going or that I’m even driving. Any time I have sex I get a horrible pain that I can’t take to keep going and start to bleed right after. My periods are so unpredictable. I’ll get it for one day and it wont come back for a week. Its always heavy too. My body had been cramping and hurting so much more. Constantly cracking or feeling stiff. I’ve been getting migraines again. And just lost all motivation to do anything. I struggle with going to see my daughter when I get off work. I just haven’t been feeling myself. I know stress and change of life style is a big part of this. But honestly I thought things were getting better. I never ate right before all of this, my life went completely down hill in the worst ways. But within the last year everything has been going good. Compared to before. I’ve been eating healthier, I’m in a great relationship. I’ve been working the same job for the last 3 years. My boyfriend and I just bought our first house. Therefore I cant say I had any major stress or depression issues again until I started noticing these changes in my body. So basically is there any thing you can think of to why my body would be acting this way? Could it be because of not taking birth control since I was for so long. Or because I’ve tried so many different ones and none of them did any good for my body? It’s really been getting the best of me, physically and mentally.
There are more neurotransmitters in the gut than there are in the brain.  So it should be no surprise that individuals commonly experience gut symptoms related to conditions such as anxiety and depression.  Hormones influence gut function in other ways as well such as affecting the microbiome of the gut, the bacterial system in our intestines.  Hormone imbalances can lead to imbalances in our bacterial colonies influencing their numbers and function.  Gastrointestinal imbalances can be caused by hormone imbalances and vice versa.
"Medically speaking, anything that occurs right before your period - such as cramps, diarrhea, and breast tenderness - is considered pre-menstrual syndrome," says Steven R. Goldstein, MD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at NYU Medical Center in New York City. But for most women it's the mood issues that become the defining factor for what we know as PMS." And, says Goldstein, this can include anything from mild to moderate depression, anxiety, mood swings, melancholia, sensitivity, even full-blown anger and self-hatred.
There are many reasons why someone may be having difficulty sleeping.  But if it’s persistent, it’s likely related to your hormones.  Melatonin, the well-known sleep chemical, is a hormone released by the pineal gland in the brain.  As a hormone, it is intimately related and affected by the other hormones.  You can think of the different hormones as pieces in a complicated game of chess.  If you move one, it affects all the others and they have to move accordingly.  With certain moves, things can get dangerous.  If you are not sleeping well, it would be wise to have a professional assist you in holistically determining why.  Conversely, if you are imbalanced for other reasons, appropriate rest is necessary to help bring things back into balance.
Vitamin D is another important nutrient that is actually a hormone within your body. It not only reduces inflammation and balances your hormones but also boosts your overall immunity (11), (12). To activate supplemental vitamin D or sunshine vitamin D, you require magnesium, and to avoid creating magnesium deficiency, take only 1,000-2,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day. Taking both together will increase your vitamin D levels much more than taking vitamin D alone.
My four favorite sources of anti-inflammatory, healthy fats include: coconut oil, avocados, grass-fed butter and wild-caught salmon. Coconut oil uses are plentiful — for example, coconut oil (or cream/milk) has natural anti-bacterial and fat-burning effects. Avocado benefits include improving heart health, lowering inflammation, controlling your appetite and contributing to your daily intake of fiber and nutrients such as potassium.

Your Parsley Health team can help you to understand and resolve these imbalances.  Hormone management is a delicate, imprecise and sophisticated matter.  Remember the analogy of the game of chess.  Moving certain pieces changes the whole board, some more than others.  Some moves can be really big game changers.  And some moves can really get you into trouble.  Be sure you are working with an expert in the game.


Xenoestrogens are found in feedlot beef and dairy that is pumped up with synthetic growth hormones, in household cleaners and personal care products that contain toxic chemicals, in plastics, acetones (e.g., fingernail polish and removers) and in pesticides, fungicides, herbicides and industrial pollutants. The xenoestrogens are ten to a hundred times more potent than hormones occurring naturally in the body. Like an unexpected guest that overstays its welcome, once xenoestrogens settle in, they are not easily removed.
Hormonal balance is vital to a healthy, cancer-free mind and body, but can be disrupted in many ways. Hormone fluctuations occur naturally, such as in puberty, menopause and perimenopause. Hormone imbalance may also be caused by toxins or an unbalanced lifestyle. Understanding the causes of hormone imbalance empowers us to prevent them, and at the same time, feel better, think better, and better prevent breast cancer.
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