These three levels of approaches are not mutually exclusive. A woman may use different approaches at different times or any combination of them, depending on the duration and severity of symptoms. Today, more and more women find that dealing with the symptoms of hormonal imbalance is best accomplished via a combination of healthy lifestyle and alternative treatments.

Estrogen and Progesterone are generally regarded as the female sex hormones, although women also have testosterone, but it is in lower amounts than men (except in PCOS). When your sex hormones are out of balance, they are rarely alone. In fact, your hormonal imbalances symptoms may stem from issues with your adrenals, thyroid, gut, liver, diet or lifestyle factors.
Estrogen plays a huge role in ensuring healthy cell growth in every part of the body. When estrogen levels begin to decline during menopause, cell renewal slows and women start to feel old and uncomfortable. By seeking female hormone imbalance treatment in Springville UT, you can reverse this process and enjoy many important health benefits, such as:
Coconut oil contains medium-chain fatty acids that are extremely beneficial for your health and provide building blocks for hormones. These fatty acids help reduce the inflammation within your body that might have occurred due to hormonal imbalance (1). Coconut oil is also great for your overall health as it helps you lose weight by boosting your metabolism and reduces stress and anxiety (2).

Lavender: Lavender oil promotes emotional balance, as it can help to treat anxiety, depression, moodiness and stress. It can also be used to promote restful sleep, which will help to balance your hormone levels as well. Diffuse 5 drops of lavender oil at home, add 5 drops to a warm water bath or apply 3 drops topically to your temples, back or neck or wrists.
Despite potential drawbacks, there are some cases in which hormone replacement and medications are helpful and even necessary for women whose symptoms are unmanageable. Occasionally, despite lifestyle therapies – diet, exercise, stress reduction, nutrient supplementation, and herbs – hormone therapy can be lifesaving (as well as mood- and brain-saving).
Hormonal balance is vital to a healthy, cancer-free mind and body, but can be disrupted in many ways. Hormone fluctuations occur naturally, such as in puberty, menopause and perimenopause. Hormone imbalance may also be caused by toxins or an unbalanced lifestyle. Understanding the causes of hormone imbalance empowers us to prevent them, and at the same time, feel better, think better, and better prevent breast cancer.
Beauty products are another source of chemical exposure for many people. There are tens of thousands of chemicals in the personal care products we encounter daily, and most of these chemicals have not been tested for long-term safety. Avoiding these products can make a tremendous difference in achieving hormone balance. Start by making simple switches like homemade deodorant, and homemade lotion and even DIY makeup if you’re feeling adventurous. Check out my full index of natural beauty recipes here.
My daughter had been on the birth control pills since she was 16 (8 years now) because of cysts in her ovaries. She has had lots of UTIs, about 2 a year since then. 2017 she had 4. The urologist looked closer into it and discovered that they all haven’t been UTIs after all. Most of the cultures came back from the lab as negative. He now saying she has interstitial cystitis. We have notice that most of her bladder flare ups are right before her period. She is in such pain during that time. And I started researching and it seems to me she might have a hormonal imbalance due to the birth control pills. I’m wondering if she gets off the pill if all her problems would go away or would getting off the pill make it worse? I’m thinking the pills has cause her problem? Tell me what you think?
A combination of approaches is usually the most effective route to take. Lifestyle changes combined with alternative medicine will most likely be the best way to alleviate the symptoms of this hormonal imbalance. However, for some women the symptoms will be so severe that a more drastic treatment is necessary. In taking the leap into pharmaceutical options, side effects are inevitable, yet sometimes they can be worth it if the benefits will outweigh the risks.
Northrup also advocates increasing your intake of omega-3 fatty acids (found in flax seed, walnuts, and eggs) as well as increasing calcium. When it comes to diet, Northrup is a strong believer in the power of a low glycemic eating plan, which shuns simple carbohydrates like bread, pasta, and pastry in favor of complex carbs like fruits and veggies plus protein and fiber.
“Macafem nutrients help restore natural hormones in women. Unlike hormone drugs, which are basically resumed in taking synthetic hormones, Macafem acts totally different in your body. It nourishes and stimulates your own natural hormone production, by inducing the optimal functioning of the pituitary and endocrine glands”. Click on the following link if you want to read and learn more about Macafem.
Weight gain is a common indication of excessive estrogen production in men, especially in the chest area. This can lead to condition called gynecomastia, or development of breasts in men. This frequently happens in men struggling with obesity because estrogen can be produced by fat cells, leading to a cycle of overproduction that can quickly become vicious and difficult to break out of without pharmacological intervention. Sexual dysfunction is another common symptom.
Hi – so my last six months since going off birth control has been awful. I was on bc for 10 years. Went off in 2015 and immeditaely got pregnant with my son -had no complications at all. Then After nursing for nine months went back on bc while I lost some weight. In August I went off birth control to try to get pregnant again. At first I had terrible perioral dermatitis, followed by hives every month. Then I got pregnant in October had terrible hives with swelling and ultimately miscarried due to not enough progesterone. My hives resolved with the miscarriage. Then again in December I got terrible hives and anaphylaxis- in Er with epi to stop the swelling. I found out I was very early (2-3 weeks) pregnant but immediately miscarried again and my progesterone was really low again – at 7 days preg pos blood test – progesterone.19; 3 days later .21 (hcg 7). I started bleeding almost immediately and miscarriage again. Since then I have not let myself get pregnant again – but each month I get hives (Not as bad) and perioral dermatitis. I’ve seen functional doctors and my inflammation is terrible – my progesterone at 7 days post ovulation was under .5. My testosterone was also low. And my estrogen is also low – and estridol and estrone ratio is backwards. I may also have PCOS. I have Hashimotos hypothyroidism. I suffer from terrible periods,spotting, pain, headaches and consfipation. I feel that my low hormones are the root of all my problems but don’t know how to fix it. Do you have any suggestions or ideas of what else I could do or what is happening to me?
Xenoestrogens tend to accumulate in body fat such as breast tissue, and play a dangerous role in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. They mimic the actions of estrogens by barging in and knocking naturally occurring estrogens right off the receptor sites of the cell. They are directly toxic to our DNA and are widely acknowledged to be contributing to the rising rate of breast cancer in western countries. After the 1976 banning of organochlorine pesticide use in Israel, breast cancer rates have come down.
Experts aren’t sure exactly how hormones impact your brain. What they do know is that changes in estrogen and progesterone can make your head feel “foggy” and make it harder for you to remember things. Some experts think estrogen might impact brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. Attention and memory problems are especially common during perimenopause and menopause. But they can also be a symptom of other hormone-related conditions, like thyroid disease. Let your doctor know if you're having trouble thinking clearly.
×