Getting regular exercise will also help, according to Amaru, as will learning to handle stress in a more healthful way. "It's pretty much impossible to cut stress out of a woman's life," says Amaru. "But if you can change the way you handle it - go for a walk, meditate, listen to music, whatever it is that helps you to de-stress - you will see a favorable impact on your perimenopause symptoms."
The content of this website is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any medical condition, nor should it be used as a substitute for medical advice from a qualified physician. The information contained herein is presented in summary form only. It should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice from a physician. Only a qualified physician can determine if you qualify for treatment.

Wendy: It got so bad that when I went to Dr. Hotze’s center about two and half years ago, I was so tired I could barely go to work. I would have to take a nap every day at lunchtime just to make it through the rest of the day. I’d go home at night and fall into bed with my clothes on. I’d sleep the whole weekend, just to save enough energy to make it through next work week. That’s how bad I’d gotten. I was depressed.
This web site offers health, wellness, fitness and nutritional information and is provided for informational purposes only. This information is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for, nor does it replace, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, Always speak with your physician or other healthcare professional before taking any medication or nutritional, herbal or homeopathic supplement, or using any treatment for a health problem. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, contact your health care provider promptly. Do not disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking professional advice because of something you have read on this web site. The use of any information provided on this web site is solely at your own risk. Nothing stated or posted on this web site or available through any services offered by Dr. Jolene Brighten, ND and Brighten Wellness, LLC, are intended to be, and must not be taken to be, the practice of medicine. Information provided on this web site DOES NOT create a doctor-patient relationship between you and any doctor affiliated with our web site. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
The functional medicine model may be a superior treatment pathway in that its primary aim is to search out the causative factors behind the hormone imbalances and then treat these causes directly. In this way, treatment has a strong, positive effect on regulating hormone levels. With that said, in some cases hormone replacement therapy, usually in the form of bioidentical hormones, is an important component in the overall treatment protocol, but this is not the only treatment offered.

Replace the right thyroid hormones. Most doctors will only prescribe T4 (such as Synthroid), the inactive form of thyroid hormone your body must convert to its active form T3. Most people do better on bioidentical hormones (like Armour, Westhroid or Nature Throid) or a combination of T4 and T3. A Functional Medicine doctor who understands how to optimize thyroid balance can customize a nutrient protocol.
Fennel: Problems with your gut health have been found to cause autoimmune reactions, including thyroid disorders. Use fennel essential oil to relax your body, improve your digestion and gut health, boost your metabolism and reduce inflammation. You can rub 2 drops of fennel into your stomach or add 1-2 drops to a class of warm water or tea to take it internally.

First week of July I was diagnosed again of having hemorrhagic cyst on both of my ovaries. That was the only time that an obygene confirmed that im having this so called hormonal imbalance, and it cause me my acne breakout, weight gain, anxiety, sleepless night etc,! I don’t know how to start to fight my condition. I lost my self steam by looking at my face full of acne for a long time now. I have read your article and I was enlightened. I just need someone to push me and tell me it’s not too late I can still do something for my condition. Thanks for your very reliable article. It’s been helpful.


The focus here will be on the ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. Even though they are typically called sex hormones, the brain understand them, and often interprets them in consequential ways that have nothing to do with sexuality. For example, the brain has many receptors that interpret and understand the chemical language of estrogen, that is why there are a lot of cognitive changes (memory) and emotional ones (mood) that occurs at menopause after estrogen plummets.  In fact, the body of a seventy-something man makes more than twice as much estrogen as that of a woman the same age. This is because small amounts of testosterone, which the testes produce throughout life, are converted to estrogen. 
Strength training is your best friend when trying to boost testosterone! Magnesium is also a true testosterone booster. So make sure to eat plenty of dark leafy greens (spinach, swiss chard, kale, watercress and collard greens), pumpkin seeds, fish (mackerel, pollock, turbot and tuna are excellent!), avocado, unroasted nuts (Brasil, almonds, cashews, pecans and walnuts), bananas, and dark chocolate.
Finally, experts advise women to pay close attention to both weight and exercise, and not to take either one to extremes. "Maintaining a healthy weight - not overweight, not underweight - and exercising regularly, without overdoing it, helps to ease PMS symptoms and make them easier to cope with," says Rebecca Amaru, MD, clinical instructor of obstetrics and gynecology at the Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York City.

The functional medicine model may be a superior treatment pathway in that its primary aim is to search out the causative factors behind the hormone imbalances and then treat these causes directly. In this way, treatment has a strong, positive effect on regulating hormone levels. With that said, in some cases hormone replacement therapy, usually in the form of bioidentical hormones, is an important component in the overall treatment protocol, but this is not the only treatment offered.
The trouble is that polyunsaturated fats are less stable and oxidize easily in the body, which can lead to inflammation and mutations within the body. Emerging evidence suggests that that this inflammation can occur in arterial cells (potentially increasing the chance of clogged arteries), skin cells (leading to skin mutations) and reproductive cells (which may be connected to PCOS and other hormone problems).

Because menopause is defined as 12 months or more without a menstrual cycle, it's easy to assume that once you enter the Big M, hormonal activity - including the ups and downs - is pretty much over. For many women this is the case. But because there is always some level of reproductive hormones left in the body, fluctuations and at least some symptoms can continue for years beyond your last period.
A variety of things may trigger headaches, but a decrease in estrogen levels is a common cause in women. If headaches occur routinely at the same time every month, just prior to or during a period, declining estrogen may be the trigger. If hormonal headaches are particularly bad, a doctor may prescribe birth control pills to keep estrogen levels more stable throughout the cycle. Try over-the-counter pain relievers to ease headache pain. If you need something stronger, a doctor may prescribe a triptan or other medication to treat and prevent headaches. Eating right, exercising, avoiding stress, and getting adequate sleep will help you minimize PMS symptoms and headaches.

Weight gain is a common indication of excessive estrogen production in men, especially in the chest area. This can lead to condition called gynecomastia, or development of breasts in men. This frequently happens in men struggling with obesity because estrogen can be produced by fat cells, leading to a cycle of overproduction that can quickly become vicious and difficult to break out of without pharmacological intervention. Sexual dysfunction is another common symptom.


Hormones — such as estrogen, testosterone, adrenaline and insulin — are extremely important chemical messengers that affect many aspects of your overall health. Hormones are secreted by various glands and organs, including your thyroid, adrenals, pituitary, ovaries, testicles and pancreas. The entire endocrine system works together to control the level of hormones circulating throughout your body, and if one or more is even slightly imbalanced, it can cause widespread, major health problems.
Hi my name is Sindy, i am 30 yrs old. I have been suffering woth estrogen dominance for over a year now. I took the depo provera shot last year Jan 2017 and only one shot and it changed my life. I am always tired, my body aches and have this dizziness around the time of my periods every month. This is annoying and disturbing my daily life now please help what can i do. I have done test and my Progesterone levels are very low.
People going through menopause transition or menopause may experience symptoms of hormonal imbalance, Lo explains. Estrogen changes during menopause can impact our brain chemicals; for example, decreasing levels of estrogen can trigger hot flashes and night sweats, she says. This can also result in some people experiencing memory problems or feelings of “fogginess” as well as moodiness, feelings of depression, poor sleep quality, decreased sex drive and vaginal dryness, Lo adds.

If you're concerned about low libido, try incorporating more zinc-rich foods—like oysters and sesame seeds—into your diet (zinc appears to be linked to an increase in testosterone levels), and ask your doctor about testosterone supplementation. To treat PCOS, your doctor might recommend taking birth control pills containing synthetic hormones that reduce the production of testosterone. It's also important to avoid refined sugars and other carbohydrates in your diet (insulin resistance is linked to a boost in testosterone production) and to eat more fiber (which counteracts blood sugar spikes and promotes the excretion of excess sugars from the body).
Was diagnosed of hyperthyroidism 2013 was on thyroid medication, 2014 i had a radioactive iodine months after I became hypothyroid and have being on levothyrosine as I was told I would take it for life,I didn’t have it for a week in April as I wanted to try fruits so I had a breakdown,with emotional issues in my relationship, lots of thinking and crying, stressed out and depressed, hotness in my head ad legs,then I ran a thyroid test t3 low,t4 low,the extremely high I’m back on my medication but still feel horrible, lack of interest, hotness… Symptoms of hormone imbalance. What can I do please, I’m losing it

Hormonal balance is vital to a healthy, cancer-free mind and body, but can be disrupted in many ways. Hormone fluctuations occur naturally, such as in puberty, menopause and perimenopause. Hormone imbalance may also be caused by toxins or an unbalanced lifestyle. Understanding the causes of hormone imbalance empowers us to prevent them, and at the same time, feel better, think better, and better prevent breast cancer.

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