“Birth control pills, patches and vaginal rings can help lower testosterone levels and improve excessive hair growth [and] hormonal breakouts,” Lo explains. “Exercise and eating a healthy diet can also help combat insulin resistance associated with PCOS. For women with PCOS who are planning pregnancy, medications such as letrozole or clomiphene citrate may help a woman ovulate.”
Strength training is your best friend when trying to boost testosterone! Magnesium is also a true testosterone booster. So make sure to eat plenty of dark leafy greens (spinach, swiss chard, kale, watercress and collard greens), pumpkin seeds, fish (mackerel, pollock, turbot and tuna are excellent!), avocado, unroasted nuts (Brasil, almonds, cashews, pecans and walnuts), bananas, and dark chocolate.
Think of your hormones like chemical messengers of your body. Each hormone sends specific instructions to every organ, making hormones responsible for just about everything your body does – how it works, how it feels, and how healthy it is. Hormones influence your mood, energy level, weight, temperature, digestion, and many other aspects of your health. And yet, we don’t often think about, let alone appreciate, our hormones until they stop working the way we want them to. And when that happens, because of their wide influence, we definitely notice.
Along the same lines, menopause — when a person who menstruates hasn’t had a period for one year — can also be behind hormonal imbalances, Dr. Mary O’Toole, an OB-GYN at Saddleback Medical Center in Laguna Hills, California, tells SheKnows. While the average age for a person to go through menopause is around 51, symptoms may begin as early as 45 or 46, she says.
I am so glad I have found this website. I think my hormones have been a bit off since college (10 years ago) but I started with a bad depression about 6-7 years ago then after I had my first child (3 years ago) everything changed. I started to get stiff while I was pregnant towards the end. After I had him I couldn’t focus and felt foggy. I continued with stiffness, night sweats, irritability, moodiness, depression, and basically all of the symtoms of estrogen dominance. After my second child the concentration and memory got a lot worse. I have been seeing holistic doctors for about 3 years now and they go back and forth with chronic infections. All of my symtoms get worse around my cycle so I felt it had to be hormonal. I finally got a hormone test and all of them were generally low, but progesterone was really low and estrogen on the low side of normal. Pregnenolone was virtually absent. My cortisol was low as well. My three biggest symptoms are depression/anxiety, brain fog/ADD symptoms, and blood sugar imbalance. Oh and I have acne at 30 like I’m 15 again 🙁 I feel like I have tried quite a few detoxes and resets but I can’t eat the way I’m supposed to because I feel shaky and jittery the whole time, which then throws my mood off. Can a reproductive endocrinologist help with this? I am willing to try anything lifestyle and diet, but I’m hesitant because I feel like nothing has worked yet. Anyone in a similar boat? Thanks
We balance all hormones, not just estrogen: Estrogen is obviously a very important female hormone, but it doesn’t act in a vacuum. A complex interplay of other hormones including progesterone, testosterone, thyroid, and DHEA can also affect your health and well-being. At Renew Youth, our female hormone imbalance treatment in Springville UT addresses all these hormones.
Magnesium– Magnesium is vital for hundreds of functions within the human body and many of us are deficient in this master mineral (here’s how to tell if you are). There are several different ways to get Magnesium: In powder form with a product like Natural Calm so that you can vary your dose and work up slowly, ionic liquid form can be added to food and drinks and dose can be worked up slowly,or transdermal form by using Magnesium oil applied to the skin (this is my favorite method). Topical application is often the most effective option for those with a damaged digestive tract or severe deficiency.

Estrogen that is too high or too low may lead to changes in breast tissues. High estrogen may cause lumpy or dense breast tissue, even cysts. Estrogen levels that are too low may cause decreased breast tissue density. In one study, postmenopausal women who took estrogen plus progesterone hormone replacement therapy experienced an increase in breast density compared to women who took a placebo. Xenoestrogens are compounds that mimic estrogen function in the body. They are naturally occurring in some plants and fungi but they are also found in some drugs, industrial by-products, and pesticides. Non-naturally occurring xenoestrogens may produce a number of harmful effects in the body, including geffects on breast density and the risk of breast cancer. They also disrupt the endocrine system. If you notice any breast changes or are concerned about your estrogen levels, see your doctor for an evaluation.


In any case, there is much women of all ages can do to rebalance progesterone and overall hormone levels to avoid becoming estrogen dominant. First, we can work with a provider to test our hormone levels for imbalances. If testing reveals estrogen dominance, we can take steps to restore the natural equilibrium by rebalancing with bioidenticals—hormones derived from plant compounds that are made to be identical in structure and function to those our body makes naturally.
My daughter had been on the birth control pills since she was 16 (8 years now) because of cysts in her ovaries. She has had lots of UTIs, about 2 a year since then. 2017 she had 4. The urologist looked closer into it and discovered that they all haven’t been UTIs after all. Most of the cultures came back from the lab as negative. He now saying she has interstitial cystitis. We have notice that most of her bladder flare ups are right before her period. She is in such pain during that time. And I started researching and it seems to me she might have a hormonal imbalance due to the birth control pills. I’m wondering if she gets off the pill if all her problems would go away or would getting off the pill make it worse? I’m thinking the pills has cause her problem? Tell me what you think?

The digestive system has much more of an impact on hormones than many of us realize. Not only is the digestive tract the source of many vital neurotransmitters in the body, but an imbalance in the gut can translate to an imbalance in neurotransmitter and hormones. Serotonin, a necessary neurotransmitter for sleep/stress balance is more concentrated in the gut than even in the brain! 70% of the immune system is found in the gut and it is quite literally the motherboard of many functions in the body. Even thyroid health has been linked to gut health.

"Medically speaking, anything that occurs right before your period - such as cramps, diarrhea, and breast tenderness - is considered pre-menstrual syndrome," says Steven R. Goldstein, MD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at NYU Medical Center in New York City. But for most women it's the mood issues that become the defining factor for what we know as PMS." And, says Goldstein, this can include anything from mild to moderate depression, anxiety, mood swings, melancholia, sensitivity, even full-blown anger and self-hatred.
Cancer-causing toxins accumulate in body fat—the more body fat the more room for stored toxins. We can excrete these by losing weight and eating fiber that binds up toxins and escorts them out of the body. Fat cells also contain the enzyme aromatase, which converts testosterone to estrogens. This is why overweight and obese women have more estrogen. The more estrogen produced in the breast tissue, the more chance of stimulating the growth of breast cancer cells. Fat also produces substances called cytokines that are inflammatory in nature. A whole host of diseases including cancers of the breast and prostate are aided and abetted by silent inflammation.
Non-bioidentical hormones can be natural – to a horse – but not bio-chemically identical to a woman’s hormones.  They are manufactured to “act like” human estrogens.  Premarin, made from the estrogens found in pregnant mare’s urine, is an example of this.  Many women experience side effects because the chemical structure does not match a woman’s biological hormone receptors.
Hormonal imbalance is a result of many factors, one of which is the consumption of too much refined sugar. When you consume more sugar, the pancreas secretes more insulin. High levels of insulin can lead to the excess production of testosterone, which may prevent normal ovulation. High levels of insulin are also responsible for fat storage and weight gain. Thus, it is best to reduce the intake of refined sugar to keep your hormones well balanced.

Hi I have been taking oral prog and T cream now for 9 months and I still have anxiety, sleep issues , sweating at night. I had a partial hyste and last March was thoroughly tested and told my Prog was low and T which was causing all my symptoms. I had been basically non functional before that with depression and anxiety. The thing is I am not like I was but still struggling and don’t feel myself. They have adjusted my hormones down and now back up several times and it’s not helping. I still have the symptoms just not the horrible dep. I also have some issues with my hands going numb at tines and tingling and weird body sensations like burning skin feeling almost and chest pressure. Could this be bc I do have adrenal fatigue or maybe I just on to much of the hormones?.if it is adrenal like to hi cortisol how can that be fixed ? Would that have caused my awful depression and anxiety in first place and that maybe all.i needed was to address that ? Or maybe do I need both hormones and that to be fixed. HELP I am so confused i don’t know what to think


The focus here will be on the ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. Even though they are typically called sex hormones, the brain understand them, and often interprets them in consequential ways that have nothing to do with sexuality. For example, the brain has many receptors that interpret and understand the chemical language of estrogen, that is why there are a lot of cognitive changes (memory) and emotional ones (mood) that occurs at menopause after estrogen plummets.  In fact, the body of a seventy-something man makes more than twice as much estrogen as that of a woman the same age. This is because small amounts of testosterone, which the testes produce throughout life, are converted to estrogen. 
When it comes to menopause symptoms, you don’t just have to suffer through using home remedies like your mother or grandmother did. Effective symptom relief is available in the form of Female hormone imbalance treatment in Philadelphia PA. When your hormones are in balance, your whole body will function better. This means no upsetting symptoms, better health, and better quality of life.

Although a number of studies over the years have pointed to elevated breast cancer risks among users of synthetic hormone replacement, the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) was the first major clinical trial of its kind to study their impact on bodily health. Results revealed greater risk than benefit among HRT users in terms of heart disease, stroke, and blood clots and a 26% increase in breast cancer risk; the trial was abruptly halted. Naysayers were quick to point out that since only one type of hormone replacement was used in the study—PremPro, a synthetic estrogen and progestin combination that was the number one prescribed HRT for women—the results could not be applied to all forms of HRT use. And that further, the average age of women subjects in the WHI was over 60 so the results could not be representative of most women on HRT. These conclusions were swiftly challenged by the Million Women Study published in the prestigious medical journal, The Lancet, [HRT use and Breast Cancer, Cancer 2003;97:1387–92.] which found that, “use of HRT, by women in the UK over the past decade has resulted in an estimated 20,000 extra breast cancers.” Note to WHI naysayers: The women in this study were between 50 and 64 years of age and a full 15,000 of these cancers were associated with any combination of estrogen-progestin.
Some of the symptoms associated with a hormonal imbalance because of PCOS include growing hair on the facial area (chin and upper lips), abnormal uterine bleeding or no periods for months or weeks, Tran tells SheKnows. It can also result in obesity, a higher chance of developing diabetes, high blood pressure, infertility and uterine cancer later in life. Treatments for this type of hormonal imbalance include birth control pills, ovarian drilling procedures, laser hair removal (for the unwanted hair) and the drugs spironolactone or metformin, she adds.
Please I seem a bit confused of the changes am experiencing its been two weeks now am having this symptoms, during my ovulation I had this full breast and erect nipple which lasted for three days after some days I saw my menses which was a bit abnormal immediately after my menses the full breast started again with erect nipple and unstable sharp pain which comes and goes after a week of this my menses started again this time it was dropping at the same time it will stop and start again. after which making it two weeks the menses started pouring and weakening my right hand, am having this fullness mostly at my right breast but the sharp pain affect both breast sometimes but more on the right side what could be the cause
The good news: There are things you can do. For many the answer lies in natural herbs and supplements, like black cohosh and red clover. Though medical studies remain conflicted over the effectiveness of these remedies, some women report relief. And while HRT was found to have a laundry list of nasty side effects, Goldstein says that for some women, short term use can still be the appropriate answer, particularly for hot flashes.
If you're concerned about low libido, try incorporating more zinc-rich foods—like oysters and sesame seeds—into your diet (zinc appears to be linked to an increase in testosterone levels), and ask your doctor about testosterone supplementation. To treat PCOS, your doctor might recommend taking birth control pills containing synthetic hormones that reduce the production of testosterone. It's also important to avoid refined sugars and other carbohydrates in your diet (insulin resistance is linked to a boost in testosterone production) and to eat more fiber (which counteracts blood sugar spikes and promotes the excretion of excess sugars from the body).
Thank you for this article I have been searching for an answer I am 28 and need help trying to figure out why my OBGYN put me on Metformin because my cycle was too long,had acne,and some facial hair, I do have my tubes tied and is wondering if this is the cause or if it’s my diet but in the future I’m going to untie my tubes and try for another baby, is there any other options besides pills
Hi, I went into depression last year after losing my Mum in September after which my body started changing. I’ve experienced increase and tenderness in my breasts, tummy increase, dizziness on and off, headaches on and off, weakness, sadness, loss of appetite, decrease in my hips and butt. All these changes made me loss my self esteem, my clothes don’t fit well. I was prescribed for vitamin E. I need help..
Experts say that mood swings and other symptoms do not necessarily indicate abnormal hormone levels. "Every study done on women with PMS shows their circulating levels of hormones are normal," says Nanette Santoro, MD. Santoro is director of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology at Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. "But some researchers believe that certain hormone metabolites in the brain cause the mood changes - or that some women just metabolize hormones differently. No one knows for sure."
If you do all those things but are still not finding relief, Goldstein says a low dose birth control pill might be the answer. The Pill works differently than hormone replacement therapy, which adds more hormones on top of the ones that are already fluctuating, sometimes making the imbalance worse. "The Pill," he says, "shuts down your hormone production completely and gives you a small, even, metered dose that is the same day in and day out. That way, he says, "you don't feel the bumps in the road as much."
Estrogen that is too high or too low may lead to changes in breast tissues. High estrogen may cause lumpy or dense breast tissue, even cysts. Estrogen levels that are too low may cause decreased breast tissue density. In one study, postmenopausal women who took estrogen plus progesterone hormone replacement therapy experienced an increase in breast density compared to women who took a placebo. Xenoestrogens are compounds that mimic estrogen function in the body. They are naturally occurring in some plants and fungi but they are also found in some drugs, industrial by-products, and pesticides. Non-naturally occurring xenoestrogens may produce a number of harmful effects in the body, including geffects on breast density and the risk of breast cancer. They also disrupt the endocrine system. If you notice any breast changes or are concerned about your estrogen levels, see your doctor for an evaluation.
Cells lining the gastrointestinal tract have receptors for both estrogen and progesterone. Levels of these hormones change throughout the course of a woman's monthly menstrual cycle. When they do, they impact the function of the gastrointestinal system. Women often experience abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, and nausea before or during their periods. These symptoms can also occur with many other conditions. If a woman experiences them along with mood changes and fatigue before or during her period, it may be more likely that the GI disturbances are occurring due to monthly hormonal fluctuations.
Alternative approaches involve little to no risk and can be an extremely effective way to treat all types of hormonal imbalance. This level of approach can involve several different therapies. Herbal remedies are the most prominent; in addition, women may turn to such techniques as acupuncture, biofeedback, massage, aromatherapy, or hypnosis. All of these can be valid and effective options, though most women find that herbal remedies are the easiest alternative treatment to follow, as the others require greater time and monetary commitment. In addition, herbal remedies are the only viable option to treat the hormonal imbalance directly at its source.
Sleep helps keep stress hormones balanced, builds energy and allows the body to recover properly. Excessive stress and poor sleep are linked with higher levels of morning cortisol, decreased immunity, trouble with work performance, and a higher susceptibility to anxiety, weight gain and depression. To maximize hormone function, ideally try to get to bed by 10 p.m. and stick with a regular sleep-wake-cycle as much as possible.
And like the price of gold, hormones fluctuate.  It's normal for hormone levels to shift from time to time.  Think about the time before and after your period, as well as pregnancy and menopause. But sometimes, they get out of balance, throwing your body out of whack.  Even a small shift can cause big problems.  The ebb and flow of hormones can be the cause of weight gain or loss, mood highs or lows, and many other functions of your cells and organs like your kidneys, muscles and heart. 
Along the same lines, menopause — when a person who menstruates hasn’t had a period for one year — can also be behind hormonal imbalances, Dr. Mary O’Toole, an OB-GYN at Saddleback Medical Center in Laguna Hills, California, tells SheKnows. While the average age for a person to go through menopause is around 51, symptoms may begin as early as 45 or 46, she says.

I’ve written about Leptin and thyroid hormones before, and these are just a small piece in the complicated hormone system in the body. In a given day or month, a woman’s body will have fluctuations in hormones like estrogen, progesterone, cortisol, lutenizing hormone, prolactin, oxytocin, leptin, ghrelin, thyroid hormones, melatonin, serotonin and others.
In addition, Ruiz says that each cycle in itself is unique, with slightly differing hormone levels. People under 40 years of age who ovulate generally have good-quality eggs, making hormone variation from cycle to cycle pretty steady, he explains. However, as the person approaches menopause, the egg quality is less consistent, resulting in more variation in hormone levels, Ruiz says.
Hi – so my last six months since going off birth control has been awful. I was on bc for 10 years. Went off in 2015 and immeditaely got pregnant with my son -had no complications at all. Then After nursing for nine months went back on bc while I lost some weight. In August I went off birth control to try to get pregnant again. At first I had terrible perioral dermatitis, followed by hives every month. Then I got pregnant in October had terrible hives with swelling and ultimately miscarried due to not enough progesterone. My hives resolved with the miscarriage. Then again in December I got terrible hives and anaphylaxis- in Er with epi to stop the swelling. I found out I was very early (2-3 weeks) pregnant but immediately miscarried again and my progesterone was really low again – at 7 days preg pos blood test – progesterone.19; 3 days later .21 (hcg 7). I started bleeding almost immediately and miscarriage again. Since then I have not let myself get pregnant again – but each month I get hives (Not as bad) and perioral dermatitis. I’ve seen functional doctors and my inflammation is terrible – my progesterone at 7 days post ovulation was under .5. My testosterone was also low. And my estrogen is also low – and estridol and estrone ratio is backwards. I may also have PCOS. I have Hashimotos hypothyroidism. I suffer from terrible periods,spotting, pain, headaches and consfipation. I feel that my low hormones are the root of all my problems but don’t know how to fix it. Do you have any suggestions or ideas of what else I could do or what is happening to me?

Ashwagandha, in particular, can be extremely effective at balancing hormones. It benefits thyroid function because it promotes the scavenging of free radicals that cause cellular damage. Ashwagandha can be used to support a sluggish or overactive thyroid, and it can also help to overcome adrenal fatigue. Your adrenals can become overtaxed when you experience too much emotional, physical or mental stress, leading to the disruption of hormones like adrenaline, cortisol and progesterone. (9)
General symptoms of hormone imbalance are familiar to women as premenstrual syndrome or PMS, or menopause symptoms of hot flashes and/or night sweats, foggy thinking, low libido, depression, fatigue, and/or weight gain in the hips or waist. As uncomfortable as these hormone fluctuation symptoms may be, symptoms of estrogen dominance are less familiar but vital to breast cancer prevention.

Xenoestrogens are found in feedlot beef and dairy that is pumped up with synthetic growth hormones, in household cleaners and personal care products that contain toxic chemicals, in plastics, acetones (e.g., fingernail polish and removers) and in pesticides, fungicides, herbicides and industrial pollutants. The xenoestrogens are ten to a hundred times more potent than hormones occurring naturally in the body. Like an unexpected guest that overstays its welcome, once xenoestrogens settle in, they are not easily removed.
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