"Women can be, and many are, greatly affected by hormone fluctuations. Sometimes it gets to the point of feeling totally overwhelmed - as if for a time they have lost control of their life," says Christiane Northrup, MD, author of The Wisdom of Menopause and Women's Bodies Women's Wisdom.Dieting, stress, anxiety, depression - even exercise -are all among the factors that can create a hormonal tailspin. So there are plenty of opportunities for things to go awry.
You might consider doing my Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet, which will naturally help reset your hormones by eliminating sugary, processed foods and food sensitivities while focusing on organic, whole, unprocessed foods. To reset female hormones, focus on specific hormone-balancing foods. Increase certain foods like flaxseeds, cruciferous veggies, good fats, and traditional organic non-GMO whole soy foods (tofu, tempeh, miso, natto, and edamame). Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of ground flaxseeds a day to your diet.

The focus here will be on the ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. Even though they are typically called sex hormones, the brain understand them, and often interprets them in consequential ways that have nothing to do with sexuality. For example, the brain has many receptors that interpret and understand the chemical language of estrogen, that is why there are a lot of cognitive changes (memory) and emotional ones (mood) that occurs at menopause after estrogen plummets.  In fact, the body of a seventy-something man makes more than twice as much estrogen as that of a woman the same age. This is because small amounts of testosterone, which the testes produce throughout life, are converted to estrogen. 
Hi, I am suffering from hormonal imbalance and my periods are irregular. My doctor advice me two tablets one is a contraceptive(I’m 21 by the way) and he told me I should excersie. But the thing is I get so sad that I just want to cry out loud for hours, I feel so depressed and I get angry or irritated at people around me.Also my lower back hurts a lot everyday.I have acne, hair fall, migraine sometimes, stomach aches everyday, I have gained weight,I go through most of the symptoms listed above. I just don’t know what to do. And the worse thing is I feel as if none understand me or nobody cares what I’m going through. You think I have cysts? Or something bad is wrong with me? Is there a possibility?
In addition, Goldstein recommends that women increase intake of vitamin B6 - either by taking supplements or by adding more beans, nuts, legumes, and fortified bread and cereals to your diet. Northrup suggests increasing levels of zinc (try poultry, seafood, nuts, and whole grains), and magnesium (found in legumes, nuts, whole grains, and vegetables).
Therefore, a diet high in sugar can have significant effects on the reproductive hormones and can help explain the link between conditions such as PCOS. Sugar is intrinsically linked to estrogen, a hormone responsible for many processes in the body. Estrogen has many beneficial effects, including regulating the reproductive system as well as helping optimize the action of insulin, the hormone that prevents high blood sugar levels.
Not getting enough sleep impacts our long-term brain health, memory, and hormone balance. Getting the ideal 8 hours of sleep per night allows the body to recover properly, detox, and keep hormones like cortisol, melatonin, and leptin balanced.  To maximize hormone function, I recommend getting to sleep from 10pm-6am. Here are more tips to help you optimize your sleep.
First week of July I was diagnosed again of having hemorrhagic cyst on both of my ovaries. That was the only time that an obygene confirmed that im having this so called hormonal imbalance, and it cause me my acne breakout, weight gain, anxiety, sleepless night etc,! I don’t know how to start to fight my condition. I lost my self steam by looking at my face full of acne for a long time now. I have read your article and I was enlightened. I just need someone to push me and tell me it’s not too late I can still do something for my condition. Thanks for your very reliable article. It’s been helpful.
“Brain fog” is a common complaint even though this is not a true medical term. It is a commonly reported symptom with many potential underlying causes. Women in perimenopause and after menopause report more memory complaints and difficulty concentrating than premenopausal women. Declining estrogen levels may be to blame, but other factors may play a role. Perimenopausal and post-menopausal women often have trouble sleeping and experience hot flashes and increased depression. These, in turn, may contribute to brain fog. Thyroid disease is another common cause of brain fog. See your doctor if you are experiencing brain fog so you can find out and treat the root cause. If declining estrogen levels are to blame, hormone replacement therapy may offer some relief and restore hormonal balance.
The Labs: Mainstream medicine typically just runs TSH and T4 (inactive thyroid hormone) to determine thyroid hormone dosage. A functional medicine thyroid panel involves looking at many other labs such as Free and Total T3 (active thyroid hormone), Reverse T3, and thyroid antibodies to rule out autoimmune thyroid problems. For a full list of thyroid labs and how to interpret them, read my previous article here.
Ashwagandha, in particular, can be extremely effective at balancing hormones. It benefits thyroid function because it promotes the scavenging of free radicals that cause cellular damage. Ashwagandha can be used to support a sluggish or overactive thyroid, and it can also help to overcome adrenal fatigue. Your adrenals can become overtaxed when you experience too much emotional, physical or mental stress, leading to the disruption of hormones like adrenaline, cortisol and progesterone. (9)
Phytoestrogenic. (e.g., black cohosh) These herbs contain estrogenic components produced by plants. These herbs, at first, do treat the hormonal imbalance by introducing these plant-based estrogens into the body. However, as a result of adding outside hormones, a woman's body may become less capable of producing estrogen on its own. This causes a further decrease of the body's own hormone levels.
Hi, I am 62 year old african american femal and have hypothyroidism i take Levothyroxine 1 tablet daily which my doctor said i will be taking for the rest of my life. I have had a partial hystorectomy which means i still have my overies. I have severe hot flashes, trouble getting a good nights sleep because of the hot flashes and have noticed i am getting several dark patchy spots on my body could these spots be the result of hormonal imbalance?
Probiotics: Probiotics can aid in repairing your gut lining, which in turn can balance your hormones. When undigested food particles, like gluten for example, leak through your gut into your bloodstream, it causes disease-causing inflammation that impacts the entire body — especially glands like the thyroid that is very susceptible to heightened inflammation. Most people with leaky gut have an a deficiency of probiotics in their guts. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that can actually improve your production and regulation of key hormones like insulin, ghrelin and leptin. (17)
Are you aware of your medication’s side effects? Some can disrupt your hormone balance, leading to side effects like fatigue, appetite changes, altered sleeping patterns, low libido, sadness and even depression. Some medications that can mess with your hormone balance include corticosteroids, stimulants, statins, dopamine agonists, rexinoids and glucocorticoids. Beware of your medications, talk to your doctor about the side effects and research natural alternatives whenever possible.

This web site offers health, wellness, fitness and nutritional information and is provided for informational purposes only. This information is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for, nor does it replace, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, Always speak with your physician or other healthcare professional before taking any medication or nutritional, herbal or homeopathic supplement, or using any treatment for a health problem. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, contact your health care provider promptly. Do not disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking professional advice because of something you have read on this web site. The use of any information provided on this web site is solely at your own risk. Nothing stated or posted on this web site or available through any services offered by Dr. Jolene Brighten, ND and Brighten Wellness, LLC, are intended to be, and must not be taken to be, the practice of medicine. Information provided on this web site DOES NOT create a doctor-patient relationship between you and any doctor affiliated with our web site. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
Instead of immediately resorting to a hormone replacement (which might be your conventional doctor’s first line of treatment), you need to figure out the “why” – what is causing the symptoms.  If you find that you do need hormones, then you need to find the way to replace them that most aligns with your body – low dose, topical, bio-identical, short duration.
Finally, experts advise women to pay close attention to both weight and exercise, and not to take either one to extremes. "Maintaining a healthy weight - not overweight, not underweight - and exercising regularly, without overdoing it, helps to ease PMS symptoms and make them easier to cope with," says Rebecca Amaru, MD, clinical instructor of obstetrics and gynecology at the Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York City.

Estrogen and Progesterone are generally regarded as the female sex hormones, although women also have testosterone, but it is in lower amounts than men (except in PCOS). When your sex hormones are out of balance, they are rarely alone. In fact, your hormonal imbalances symptoms may stem from issues with your adrenals, thyroid, gut, liver, diet or lifestyle factors.


Proper nutrition is essential to maintain a healthy endocrine system, which regulates hormones in the body. Try to eat a diet rich in omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids. These are found in fish oils, nuts, seeds and vegetable oils. Also, consume a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables to provide a full spectrum of vitamins and minerals. Buy organic foods when possible, and avoid foods with added hormones and chemical additives such as commercial meat, eggs and dairy products. Hormone-free and organic options are available in most supermarkets. Although soy, which has naturally occurring estrogen, can help increase estrogen levels, too much estrogen is not healthy. High estrogen levels have been associated with cancer and tumor growth.
Physical activity is important to hormone balance, not to mention overall health and a good mental state. Exercise helps to keep cortisol levels low and also helps maintain hormone balance by reducing the level of cortisol in the body and sustaining serum insulin levels. Cortisol levels can become significantly high when the body is experiencing stress, either real or imagined.17 Exercise helps counter the effects of stress and regular moderate exercise can lower cortisol levels.18-20 Moderate exercise for 30 to 60 minutes each day can have a profound effect on hormone balance.21-23
Using essential oils for a quick massage or simply diffusing them in your surroundings is another great way to treat a hormonal imbalance. Give yourself a timeline when using essential oils. If you don’t notice that they are helping within 3-4 weeks, discontinue and try another essential oil but don’t use too many at once and don’t use them indefinitely.
One type of hormonal imbalance treatment is bioidentical hormone replacement therapy. BHRT can balance hormone levels that become upset or deficient through lifestyle habits and aging. Unlike conventional HRT, BHRT is derived from plant sources and structured similarly to hormones circulating in the body.24-26 Since the bioidentical hormones are recognized in the body, they are effectively assimilated and used. BHRT replenishes the body with the healthy hormone levels your body needs to function optimally. Forms of BHRT include progesterone, estrogen, and testosterone. Blood tests are taken to determine hormone levels. If there is a deficiency or imbalance, BHRT is recommended to safely balance hormone levels. Restoring hormone balance can provide greater protection from chronic diseases and alleviate menopausal symptoms. Saliva testing of hormonal levels is used by some practitioners, but peer-reviewed studies from saliva testing are not nearly as prevalent. Serum hormone studies show the ideal levels to reduce the risk of heart disease and some cancers. Compounding pharmacies specialize in producing BHRT. Doses are determined on an individual basis and available in different administrations (topical, oral, sublingual, etc.). A few studies show that topical BHRT has a better safety profile than the orthodox oral HRT.27-29 It is important to note that most physicians are not trained in prescribing BHRT and they may be unfamiliar with the medical literature that supports this treatment. Fortunately, there are physicians specializing in age-management medicine who can help you determine which BHRT treatments are best for you.
A major component of balancing your hormones naturally is addressing any emotional imbalances that you are dealing with. You can do this by reducing stress levels, engaging in personal reflection and taking time for yourself. Practicing meditation or healing prayer can be extremely beneficial, and so can deep breathing exercises, spending time outdoors and exercising every day. Traditional Chinese Medicine therapies like acupuncture and massage can also help to improve hormonal balance, combat stress and improve blood flow.
Dr. Jolene Brighten is a Functional Medicine Naturopathic Medical Doctor and the founder and CEO of Rubus Health—a root cause women’s medicine clinic specializing in the treatment of hormone disorders, including adrenal, thyroid, and hormonal birth control related conditions. She is a recognized as an expert in Post-Birth Control Syndrome and the long term side effects associated with hormonal contraceptives. Dr. Brighten is a best-selling author, speaker, and clinical educator.

My daughter had been on the birth control pills since she was 16 (8 years now) because of cysts in her ovaries. She has had lots of UTIs, about 2 a year since then. 2017 she had 4. The urologist looked closer into it and discovered that they all haven’t been UTIs after all. Most of the cultures came back from the lab as negative. He now saying she has interstitial cystitis. We have notice that most of her bladder flare ups are right before her period. She is in such pain during that time. And I started researching and it seems to me she might have a hormonal imbalance due to the birth control pills. I’m wondering if she gets off the pill if all her problems would go away or would getting off the pill make it worse? I’m thinking the pills has cause her problem? Tell me what you think?
TCM practitioners believe that the emotions of fear cause disease in your reproductive organs, kidneys and adrenals, affecting cortisol levels. This can lead to serious conditions like PCOS and infertility. The emotions of frustration, impatience and un-forgiveness cause disease in your liver, which can lead to an estrogen imbalance. And emotions of worry and anxiety can cause issues with your insulin levels, which can then affect several hormones. (11)

Wendy: No other answers. They said next year to come in for my checkup and I said, “I’m still not feeling well,” and they just said that was normal. There was nothing they could do for me. Finally I asked the doctor, I said, “Well, can you please run some tests just to make sure?” I said, “Something’s not right. I don’t feel well at all,” so he ran some tests and sure enough, my hormones were not balanced, so he put me on counterfeit hormones, which for a while helped and I didn’t realize that it’s kind of like a band-aid for the symptoms. It doesn’t really replenish any of the hormones that my body was needing, so for a few years I did okay, then I’d start saying, “I still don’t feel well,” so he’d put me on different ones.


Hello! I’m 43 years old.i have an 8yr history with hormonal imbalance.it started with me getting periods every 15days. When I went to the doctor she said I had a cyst in my ovary. Over the years it just kept getting from bad to worse with me getting periods within 15 days to now when I don’t get a period for 3-6months..! Two years ago my doctor decided to put a marena for me and soon after that I started to put on weight and had a total loss of libido. I got it removed after 4 months. So now I have weight that I gained since the marena which is around my belly and mentally I feel like I’m going crazy most of the time! Very extreme emotions of sadness,depression etc

After eating way more than you should have, or having gone through half a bottle of wine, do you look back and ask yourself why? Common causes of cravings and excess eating are adrenal fatigue, insulin resistance, and other hormonal imbalances. Again, minimizing sugars, alcohol, dairy and wheat — although difficult — not only will help control cravings, but your digestive issues as well.
If you suspect that you might suffer from hormonal imbalance, the first step is to consult with a medical doctor. It is possible that your lab results are within the normal range but you still have many of the above symptoms, some of the tests are not sensitive enough to pick up on all indications of imbalance.  This just means that your journey to find alternative treatments will be a long one, but very much worth it.
"Women can be, and many are, greatly affected by hormone fluctuations. Sometimes it gets to the point of feeling totally overwhelmed - as if for a time they have lost control of their life," says Christiane Northrup, MD, author of The Wisdom of Menopause and Women's Bodies Women's Wisdom.Dieting, stress, anxiety, depression - even exercise -are all among the factors that can create a hormonal tailspin. So there are plenty of opportunities for things to go awry.
The good news: There are things you can do. For many the answer lies in natural herbs and supplements, like black cohosh and red clover. Though medical studies remain conflicted over the effectiveness of these remedies, some women report relief. And while HRT was found to have a laundry list of nasty side effects, Goldstein says that for some women, short term use can still be the appropriate answer, particularly for hot flashes.
Was diagnosed of hyperthyroidism 2013 was on thyroid medication, 2014 i had a radioactive iodine months after I became hypothyroid and have being on levothyrosine as I was told I would take it for life,I didn’t have it for a week in April as I wanted to try fruits so I had a breakdown,with emotional issues in my relationship, lots of thinking and crying, stressed out and depressed, hotness in my head ad legs,then I ran a thyroid test t3 low,t4 low,the extremely high I’m back on my medication but still feel horrible, lack of interest, hotness… Symptoms of hormone imbalance. What can I do please, I’m losing it
At Aligned Modern Health, we work with our patients to find those lifestyle factors that are contributing to their imbalances. This starts with a comprehensive blood analysis, followed by a salivary cortisol test to detect adrenal problems. A complete GI panel and tests for food sensitivities will also help pinpoint the cause of the hormone trouble.

The female hormone, estrogen, is produced in the ovaries. It is responsible for the growth of the female sex organs and mammary glands. It is also responsible for regulating the menstrual cycle, and plays a role in sex drive. As women age, the amount of estrogen produced decreases. Hormone production can also fluctuate throughout life, causing mood swings, decreased libido and infertility. Many women look first to natural remedies to help restore hormone balance. However, always consult your physician or health care provider before trying herbs or other alternative therapies, especially if you are currently taking prescription hormone replacements.
At your appointment with Aligned Modern Health, our goal will be to get to the root cause of your symptoms to provide a good roadmap for treatment. First, your doctor will thoroughly review your health history, including a look at your family history, to rule out other health conditions that might be causing your symptoms. Be prepared to be candid at this appointment, as this will help your doctor get a more accurate diagnosis.
Everyone is tired sometimes. But you should recover with adequate rest, hydration and a healthy diet.  If you feel you are taking care of yourself but are still exhausted or just can’t seem to get back to your best, consider having a comprehensive evaluation of your hormone levels.  Adrenal fatigue and hypothyroidism are more prevalent in our high-paced society than you may think.
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