I would love for you guys to email me and give me some advice! I’ve been on the birth control Lo Loestrin Fe now for about 5 years. After a year of taking this I quit having a period altogether. I haven’t had a period in 4 years!! My OBGYN says its normal on this birth control, but it kind of freaks me out. Also I have been miserable with anxiety, mood swings, and depression over the last few years. I just wonder if this birth control has something to do with it all. I want to know what I would feel like if I quit taking it but it scares me, I also really don’t want to get pregnant right now. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!
Hi. I’m seeing comments bout people gaining a few pounds from hormone imbalance and having trouble getting it off. I wish that was my problem. I literally gained 60 lbs in 60 days. I went from 125 to 185 in 2 months. I was having and still do horrific hot flashes sudden anxiety depression sluggish brain I can’t sleep . Well I sleep then awaken a few hours later so uncomfortable burning up on the inside I can’t get to a good internal temp and I’m up that’s it. I’m exhausted. I was told I was borderline hypo and was put on Synthroid at 88 mg it did nothing so I doubled it but it made me have headaches so I cut back to 132 and it still is t doing any good . Docs put me in on birth Control for the hot flashes but your article makes it sound like that was a big mistake! It did help a lot but I still do get them and when I do now ( at least
day, I am at my 30s few years I suffer from delay Mestration but now God has restore me and for the past few months my circle is normal but I am loosing weight and getting thinner,i notice that if I take some appetizers drug or blood tonic I eat much and gain weight and my menstrual cycle stop but if I stop taking appetizers multivitamin tonic my menstrual cycle would be normal,please help me’ now that my circle are normal I am loosing weight and getting thinner.am I suffering from hormones imbalance?i am loosing my mind….i would be grateful to hear from you, Godbless
Supplement smartly. Fish oil and additional vitamin D and B vitamins help balance estrogen. Take these in addition to a good multivitamin and mineral with sufficient calcium and magnesium. Probiotics, antioxidants and phytonutrients (vitamin E, resveratrol, curcumin, n-actetyl cysteine, green tea, selenium), and the anti-inflammatory omega-6 fat (GLA or gamma linoleic acid) can help balance sex hormones. You can find these and other hormone-balancing supplements in my store.
After hormone levels have been tested, ask your doctor if plant foods that contain phytoestrogens, which are groups of chemicals that weakly act like estrogen in the body, are right for you. According to Healthline, Non-GMO Project Verified soy is a great dietary source of phytoestrogens, specifically isoflavones, which bind to estrogen receptors in the body. While there are some conflicting studies on isoflavones and soy, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reports substantial beneficial evidence that soy foods may help address many conditions. Flaxseed is another significant source of phytoestrogens, which can help promote hormone balance if taken correctly.
Hi – so my last six months since going off birth control has been awful. I was on bc for 10 years. Went off in 2015 and immeditaely got pregnant with my son -had no complications at all. Then After nursing for nine months went back on bc while I lost some weight. In August I went off birth control to try to get pregnant again. At first I had terrible perioral dermatitis, followed by hives every month. Then I got pregnant in October had terrible hives with swelling and ultimately miscarried due to not enough progesterone. My hives resolved with the miscarriage. Then again in December I got terrible hives and anaphylaxis- in Er with epi to stop the swelling. I found out I was very early (2-3 weeks) pregnant but immediately miscarried again and my progesterone was really low again – at 7 days preg pos blood test – progesterone.19; 3 days later .21 (hcg 7). I started bleeding almost immediately and miscarriage again. Since then I have not let myself get pregnant again – but each month I get hives (Not as bad) and perioral dermatitis. I’ve seen functional doctors and my inflammation is terrible – my progesterone at 7 days post ovulation was under .5. My testosterone was also low. And my estrogen is also low – and estridol and estrone ratio is backwards. I may also have PCOS. I have Hashimotos hypothyroidism. I suffer from terrible periods,spotting, pain, headaches and consfipation. I feel that my low hormones are the root of all my problems but don’t know how to fix it. Do you have any suggestions or ideas of what else I could do or what is happening to me?
For this reason, Coconut Oil is amazing for hormone health. It provides the necessary building blocks for hormone production, can assist weight loss, reduce inflammation, and even has antimicrobial and antibacterial properties. My favorite way to consume it is to blend into coffee or tea. This is the highest quality one I’ve found. Other quality sources of fats include avocados, animal fats, olive oil, grass fed meats, pastured eggs, and raw dairy (for those who tolerate it). Quality seafood is also very important, as it is nature’s best source of naturally occurring Omega-3s.
I would love for you guys to email me and give me some advice! I’ve been on the birth control Lo Loestrin Fe now for about 5 years. After a year of taking this I quit having a period altogether. I haven’t had a period in 4 years!! My OBGYN says its normal on this birth control, but it kind of freaks me out. Also I have been miserable with anxiety, mood swings, and depression over the last few years. I just wonder if this birth control has something to do with it all. I want to know what I would feel like if I quit taking it but it scares me, I also really don’t want to get pregnant right now. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!
The focus here will be on the ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. Even though they are typically called sex hormones, the brain understand them, and often interprets them in consequential ways that have nothing to do with sexuality. For example, the brain has many receptors that interpret and understand the chemical language of estrogen, that is why there are a lot of cognitive changes (memory) and emotional ones (mood) that occurs at menopause after estrogen plummets.  In fact, the body of a seventy-something man makes more than twice as much estrogen as that of a woman the same age. This is because small amounts of testosterone, which the testes produce throughout life, are converted to estrogen. 
After eating way more than you should have, or having gone through half a bottle of wine, do you look back and ask yourself why? Common causes of cravings and excess eating are adrenal fatigue, insulin resistance, and other hormonal imbalances. Again, minimizing sugars, alcohol, dairy and wheat — although difficult — not only will help control cravings, but your digestive issues as well.
In the meantime, there’s no need to wait on getting started with a diet overhaul. Since high sugar intake along with a highly refined carb/processed food diet are the most common contributors to insulin resistance and hormonal imbalance, making changes to eat “clean” can greatly improve health overall. This includes eating a variety of organic vegetables and fruits, whole grains, low fat dairy products, and lean sources of protein such as fish, suggests Healthline. It is also important to limit caffeine and alcohol consumption, as these can cause cortisol hormones to spike (which can disrupt all other hormone levels).
It is well known that exercise helps regulate hormone levels. Regular exercise strengthens the endocrine system, which, again, is responsible for the regulation of all hormones. The Pro Health Library cites several studies on hormone imbalance and exercise. In addition to regulating hormone levels, exercise helps strengthen the immune system, combat stress, increase energy and improve overall quality of life. It is important to get 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise each day. This may include jogging, biking, swimming or even a brisk walk.
Urine testing: A urine hormone test requires that you collect every drop of urine for a 24-hour period. Then your urine is tested to identify each hormone that is present and at what levels on that particular day. This is the most extensive hormone health test because it measures your hormone levels throughout the entire day, instead of the levels for a moment in time, which is the case for blood and saliva tests.
Probiotics: Probiotics can aid in repairing your gut lining, which in turn can balance your hormones. When undigested food particles, like gluten for example, leak through your gut into your bloodstream, it causes disease-causing inflammation that impacts the entire body — especially glands like the thyroid that is very susceptible to heightened inflammation. Most people with leaky gut have an a deficiency of probiotics in their guts. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that can actually improve your production and regulation of key hormones like insulin, ghrelin and leptin. (17)
Yes, there are lifestyle, diet and physical activity components to maintaining a healthy weight, but that isn't the end of the story. Many women have underlying hormonal imbalances that make it difficult to maintain a healthy weight. Unaddressed or emerging insulin resistance is one of the most common; small changes in diet — such as eliminating processed foods, sugars and wheat — are steps in the right direction.
I have so many of the issues listed. I really want to stop taking my birth control pills. They are combination pills, with a decently high amount of estrogen. The problem is, the last time I tried to quit taking them was three years ago. And that time was hell. 2 months after I stopped I had massive migraines almost daily. They only went away when I started pills back up. I never had migraines at all before that. Now I still get them here and there. I may quit again anyway since I still get migraines.
Hello! I’m 43 years old.i have an 8yr history with hormonal imbalance.it started with me getting periods every 15days. When I went to the doctor she said I had a cyst in my ovary. Over the years it just kept getting from bad to worse with me getting periods within 15 days to now when I don’t get a period for 3-6months..! Two years ago my doctor decided to put a marena for me and soon after that I started to put on weight and had a total loss of libido. I got it removed after 4 months. So now I have weight that I gained since the marena which is around my belly and mentally I feel like I’m going crazy most of the time! Very extreme emotions of sadness,depression etc
Fatigue, mood instability, weight gain, foggy brain/memory loss, adult acne, hair loss/facial hair, lower sex drive, extreme PMS slide. These symptoms do not just reduce quality of life but they also increase chances of stroke, heart disease, cancer and of course gynecological problems (endometriosis, fibroid, tumors and cysts). There are solutions, don't just acquiesce to lower quality of life. And even if you accept such low standards of functionality, this might amount to truncating your life.  
Hi… For a while now I’ve been reading about the effects of hormonal imbalance in the physical appearance or physique in general… What I’m really concerned about is my broad shoulder which come off too manly and instead of the feminine shape like a normal girl would have…I ofen get insecure because I cannot wear the clothes I want because my shape seem to be too masculine for the attire (as it appears as an inverted triangle rather than an hour glass)… and just recently I checked with my doctor about my irregular menstruation to where she said that I’m having imbalances in my hormones… having too much estrogen than progesterone… Is it possible that my masculine appearance could be attributed to the said hormonal imbalance???…. and could it be addressed by intake of pills???
There are more neurotransmitters in the gut than there are in the brain.  So it should be no surprise that individuals commonly experience gut symptoms related to conditions such as anxiety and depression.  Hormones influence gut function in other ways as well such as affecting the microbiome of the gut, the bacterial system in our intestines.  Hormone imbalances can lead to imbalances in our bacterial colonies influencing their numbers and function.  Gastrointestinal imbalances can be caused by hormone imbalances and vice versa.
Vitamin D is another important nutrient that is actually a hormone within your body. It not only reduces inflammation and balances your hormones but also boosts your overall immunity (11), (12). To activate supplemental vitamin D or sunshine vitamin D, you require magnesium, and to avoid creating magnesium deficiency, take only 1,000-2,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day. Taking both together will increase your vitamin D levels much more than taking vitamin D alone.

Although a number of studies over the years have pointed to elevated breast cancer risks among users of synthetic hormone replacement, the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) was the first major clinical trial of its kind to study their impact on bodily health. Results revealed greater risk than benefit among HRT users in terms of heart disease, stroke, and blood clots and a 26% increase in breast cancer risk; the trial was abruptly halted. Naysayers were quick to point out that since only one type of hormone replacement was used in the study—PremPro, a synthetic estrogen and progestin combination that was the number one prescribed HRT for women—the results could not be applied to all forms of HRT use. And that further, the average age of women subjects in the WHI was over 60 so the results could not be representative of most women on HRT. These conclusions were swiftly challenged by the Million Women Study published in the prestigious medical journal, The Lancet, [HRT use and Breast Cancer, Cancer 2003;97:1387–92.] which found that, “use of HRT, by women in the UK over the past decade has resulted in an estimated 20,000 extra breast cancers.” Note to WHI naysayers: The women in this study were between 50 and 64 years of age and a full 15,000 of these cancers were associated with any combination of estrogen-progestin.
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