Your hormones are produced in the major endocrine glands – your brain (hypothalamus, pineal, and pituitary glands), thyroid, parathyroid, adrenals, pancreas, and reproductive glands (ovaries and testes). Some hormones are also produced in your gastrointestinal tract. With hormones, it’s all about balance. As Goldilocks lamented (and I’m paraphrasing here), there can’t be too much or too little. Hormones have to be just right. Otherwise, a myriad of health issues can happen.
Bone broth: Bone broth soothes the digestive system and supplies the body with nutrients that can be easily absorbed. Consuming bone broth or protein powder made from bone broth is especially beneficial to your health because it contains healing compounds like collagen, proline, glycine and glutamine, which have the powder to boost your overall health.
Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.
The content of this website is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any medical condition, nor should it be used as a substitute for medical advice from a qualified physician. The information contained herein is presented in summary form only. It should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice from a physician. Only a qualified physician can determine if you qualify for treatment.
My daughter had been on the birth control pills since she was 16 (8 years now) because of cysts in her ovaries. She has had lots of UTIs, about 2 a year since then. 2017 she had 4. The urologist looked closer into it and discovered that they all haven’t been UTIs after all. Most of the cultures came back from the lab as negative. He now saying she has interstitial cystitis. We have notice that most of her bladder flare ups are right before her period. She is in such pain during that time. And I started researching and it seems to me she might have a hormonal imbalance due to the birth control pills. I’m wondering if she gets off the pill if all her problems would go away or would getting off the pill make it worse? I’m thinking the pills has cause her problem? Tell me what you think?
People going through menopause transition or menopause may experience symptoms of hormonal imbalance, Lo explains. Estrogen changes during menopause can impact our brain chemicals; for example, decreasing levels of estrogen can trigger hot flashes and night sweats, she says. This can also result in some people experiencing memory problems or feelings of “fogginess” as well as moodiness, feelings of depression, poor sleep quality, decreased sex drive and vaginal dryness, Lo adds.

A combination of approaches is usually the most effective route to take. Lifestyle changes combined with alternative medicine will most likely be the best way to alleviate the symptoms of this hormonal imbalance. However, for some women the symptoms will be so severe that a more drastic treatment is necessary. In taking the leap into pharmaceutical options, side effects are inevitable, yet sometimes they can be worth it if the benefits will outweigh the risks.
Why is it that so many people struggle with weight fluctuations?  Why is the scale so merciless folks are starving themselves and working so hard?  It’s because they are starving themselves and working so hard.  The body experiences these challenges as stress.  And when the body is stressed, it produces more cortisol.  Cortisol tells your body to hang on to that fat because it’s a great storage form of energy.
“Brain fog” is a common complaint even though this is not a true medical term. It is a commonly reported symptom with many potential underlying causes. Women in perimenopause and after menopause report more memory complaints and difficulty concentrating than premenopausal women. Declining estrogen levels may be to blame, but other factors may play a role. Perimenopausal and post-menopausal women often have trouble sleeping and experience hot flashes and increased depression. These, in turn, may contribute to brain fog. Thyroid disease is another common cause of brain fog. See your doctor if you are experiencing brain fog so you can find out and treat the root cause. If declining estrogen levels are to blame, hormone replacement therapy may offer some relief and restore hormonal balance.
Since I had a total thyroidectomy almost a yr ago my libido and breast have been dropping like crazy, I’m having night sweats, anxiety, puffy eyes, stress, confusion, lack of sleep, lack of energy, major hair loss, I’m getting very irritable very fast, depressed and worry a lot over nothing. I think its a hormonal issue because I never had the majority of these problems in my life till after the TT especially the the first ones, no libido and no breasts, could this be a hormonal issue/problem or am I losing it???
Functional medicine wants to find out the root cause of patients’ hormonal symptoms as well as support the body’s natural mechanisms for healthy hormone balance, and that makes a lot more sense to me. Let’s go over some of the most common hormone problems that I see in patients, and that you may be going through right now. I’ll also explain which labs you may want to consider asking your doctor about.

Hi. I’m seeing comments bout people gaining a few pounds from hormone imbalance and having trouble getting it off. I wish that was my problem. I literally gained 60 lbs in 60 days. I went from 125 to 185 in 2 months. I was having and still do horrific hot flashes sudden anxiety depression sluggish brain I can’t sleep . Well I sleep then awaken a few hours later so uncomfortable burning up on the inside I can’t get to a good internal temp and I’m up that’s it. I’m exhausted. I was told I was borderline hypo and was put on Synthroid at 88 mg it did nothing so I doubled it but it made me have headaches so I cut back to 132 and it still is t doing any good . Docs put me in on birth Control for the hot flashes but your article makes it sound like that was a big mistake! It did help a lot but I still do get them and when I do now ( at least
In the meantime, there’s no need to wait on getting started with a diet overhaul. Since high sugar intake along with a highly refined carb/processed food diet are the most common contributors to insulin resistance and hormonal imbalance, making changes to eat “clean” can greatly improve health overall. This includes eating a variety of organic vegetables and fruits, whole grains, low fat dairy products, and lean sources of protein such as fish, suggests Healthline. It is also important to limit caffeine and alcohol consumption, as these can cause cortisol hormones to spike (which can disrupt all other hormone levels).
There are more neurotransmitters in the gut than there are in the brain.  So it should be no surprise that individuals commonly experience gut symptoms related to conditions such as anxiety and depression.  Hormones influence gut function in other ways as well such as affecting the microbiome of the gut, the bacterial system in our intestines.  Hormone imbalances can lead to imbalances in our bacterial colonies influencing their numbers and function.  Gastrointestinal imbalances can be caused by hormone imbalances and vice versa.
Here’s a rule of thumb: Steer clear from oils high in omega-6 fats (safflower, sunflower, corn, cottonseed, canola, soybean and peanut), and load up on rich sources of natural omega-3s instead (wild fish, flaxseed, chia seeds, walnuts and grass-fed animal products). I also want to mention that there is a type of omega-6 fat that you want to get in your diet called GLA. GLA (gamma-linoleic acid) can be taken in supplement form by using evening primrose oil or borage oil, and it’s also found in hemp seeds. Studies show supplementing with GLA can support healthy progesterone levels. (4)

The digestive system has much more of an impact on hormones than many of us realize. Not only is the digestive tract the source of many vital neurotransmitters in the body, but an imbalance in the gut can translate to an imbalance in neurotransmitter and hormones. Serotonin, a necessary neurotransmitter for sleep/stress balance is more concentrated in the gut than even in the brain! 70% of the immune system is found in the gut and it is quite literally the motherboard of many functions in the body. Even thyroid health has been linked to gut health.


Feeling bloated, irritable, or just not your best? A hormone imbalance could be to blame. Hormones are chemical “messengers” that impact the way your cells and organs function. It’s normal for your levels to shift at different times of your life, such as before and during your period or a pregnancy, or during menopause. But some medications and health issues can cause them to go up or down, too.
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