If you think that hormonal imbalance is limited to causing just weight gain and acne, you are overlooking the broader scenario. Hormonal imbalance can cause several nasty symptoms including interrupted menstrual cycle, loss of libido, pain in breasts, PMS, cellulite, excessive exhaustion and even cancer. The symptoms appear in your body much later than the sneaky entry of the problem itself. Therefore, once you start noticing a hint of hormonal imbalance in your body, you should visit a primary care physician in OKC, who can recommend a specialist to cure the imbalance.

Help..i been on bhrt since April, take oral prog and T cream and I still don’t feel good. Could I be getting to much or is it because I nay also have hi cortisol and if I so how can I fix that? How is this tested ? I have sleep issues, sweating at night, hi anxiety and feelings in body like almost burning sensation and hands tingling and going numb at times. I started the bhrt bc I was tested thoroughly and told I was low in both prog and T. I had partial hyster so They say my hormones not working right now. Before I got tested i was almost non functional with anxiety and depression and altho the dep is better I still have all.these symptoms. What can or should I do ? My drs just keep changing doses on me. I think maybe too high again. But on all doses I have still struggled with same symptoms. If I have hi cortisol or adrenal issues and that was fixed would I not need the hormones?? Or would need to have both? Can hi cortisol or adrenal issues cause you to become that mentally bad off like I was before? Or could it be both issues .
“Brain fog” is a common complaint even though this is not a true medical term. It is a commonly reported symptom with many potential underlying causes. Women in perimenopause and after menopause report more memory complaints and difficulty concentrating than premenopausal women. Declining estrogen levels may be to blame, but other factors may play a role. Perimenopausal and post-menopausal women often have trouble sleeping and experience hot flashes and increased depression. These, in turn, may contribute to brain fog. Thyroid disease is another common cause of brain fog. See your doctor if you are experiencing brain fog so you can find out and treat the root cause. If declining estrogen levels are to blame, hormone replacement therapy may offer some relief and restore hormonal balance.
Hi, I am 62 year old african american femal and have hypothyroidism i take Levothyroxine 1 tablet daily which my doctor said i will be taking for the rest of my life. I have had a partial hystorectomy which means i still have my overies. I have severe hot flashes, trouble getting a good nights sleep because of the hot flashes and have noticed i am getting several dark patchy spots on my body could these spots be the result of hormonal imbalance?
First week of July I was diagnosed again of having hemorrhagic cyst on both of my ovaries. That was the only time that an obygene confirmed that im having this so called hormonal imbalance, and it cause me my acne breakout, weight gain, anxiety, sleepless night etc,! I don’t know how to start to fight my condition. I lost my self steam by looking at my face full of acne for a long time now. I have read your article and I was enlightened. I just need someone to push me and tell me it’s not too late I can still do something for my condition. Thanks for your very reliable article. It’s been helpful.
Wendy: No other answers. They said next year to come in for my checkup and I said, “I’m still not feeling well,” and they just said that was normal. There was nothing they could do for me. Finally I asked the doctor, I said, “Well, can you please run some tests just to make sure?” I said, “Something’s not right. I don’t feel well at all,” so he ran some tests and sure enough, my hormones were not balanced, so he put me on counterfeit hormones, which for a while helped and I didn’t realize that it’s kind of like a band-aid for the symptoms. It doesn’t really replenish any of the hormones that my body was needing, so for a few years I did okay, then I’d start saying, “I still don’t feel well,” so he’d put me on different ones.
After hormone levels have been tested, ask your doctor if plant foods that contain phytoestrogens, which are groups of chemicals that weakly act like estrogen in the body, are right for you. According to Healthline, Non-GMO Project Verified soy is a great dietary source of phytoestrogens, specifically isoflavones, which bind to estrogen receptors in the body. While there are some conflicting studies on isoflavones and soy, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reports substantial beneficial evidence that soy foods may help address many conditions. Flaxseed is another significant source of phytoestrogens, which can help promote hormone balance if taken correctly.

We balance all hormones, not just estrogen: The results of age-related estrogen decline cannot be corrected simply by adding more estrogen to the body. This is why our female hormone imbalance treatment in Philadelphia PA addresses all the hormones that affect menopause and aging, such as estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, thyroid, cortisol, DHEA, and growth hormone.
Get a lot of natural light during the day, and spend at least 30 minutes outside each day if possible. The wide-spectrum of natural lighting helps boost serotonin levels which balance melatonin levels at night. In fact, my doctor routinely recommends that his patients get 30 minutes of sunlight or bright light within an hour of waking when they are working to balance hormones.

Most women have menstrual cycles that last between 21 and 35 days. Up to one quarter of women experience irregular periods. This includes having periods that are shorter or longer than usual or periods that are lighter or heavier than usual. Some women who have irregular periods may experience abdominal cramping or a lack of ovulation. Amenorrhea is a medical term that refers to the an absence of periods for at least 3 months even though a woman is not pregnant. Menorrhagia is a disorder that causes excessive menstrual bleeding. Dysmenorrhea causes pain and cramping during periods. Prolonged menstrual bleeding involves periods in which bleeding routinely lasts for 8 days or longer. Oligomenorrhea is a condition in which periods occur infrequently or more than every 35 days. See your doctor if you believe hormonal imbalance is affecting your menstrual cycle.
He explains that in a normal menstruating person, the first half of the cycle, (called the follicular phase) is dominated by estrogen. Then, the second half of the cycle (called the luteal phase) is dominated by progesterone. “The luteal phase has both estrogen and progesterone,” he notes. “If there is no pregnancy, the egg dies and the corpus luteum stops producing hormones, hormone levels drop to near zero and this triggers a period.”
Bloating, fatigue, irritability, hair loss, palpitations, mood swings, problems with blood sugar, trouble concentrating, infertility -- these are just a few symptoms of hormone imbalance. These compounds affect every cell and system in the body. Hormone imbalance can debilitate you. Some hormonal shifts are normal, like monthly fluctuations responsible for menstruation and ovulation or the changes that occur during pregnancy. Menopause is another time for a normal hormonal shift in a woman's life. Other times these fluctuations may be due to a medication or a medical condition.
Hi, I am 62 year old african american femal and have hypothyroidism i take Levothyroxine 1 tablet daily which my doctor said i will be taking for the rest of my life. I have had a partial hystorectomy which means i still have my overies. I have severe hot flashes, trouble getting a good nights sleep because of the hot flashes and have noticed i am getting several dark patchy spots on my body could these spots be the result of hormonal imbalance?

“Brain fog” is a common complaint even though this is not a true medical term. It is a commonly reported symptom with many potential underlying causes. Women in perimenopause and after menopause report more memory complaints and difficulty concentrating than premenopausal women. Declining estrogen levels may be to blame, but other factors may play a role. Perimenopausal and post-menopausal women often have trouble sleeping and experience hot flashes and increased depression. These, in turn, may contribute to brain fog. Thyroid disease is another common cause of brain fog. See your doctor if you are experiencing brain fog so you can find out and treat the root cause. If declining estrogen levels are to blame, hormone replacement therapy may offer some relief and restore hormonal balance.
Hi,am 21 i have abnormal period some time i get it in 2 weeks some times in 3,i have tired to use birth control pill but after i used it for 3 month i stoped,while i was on the pill everything is right no pain no abnormality nor acne.but right after i stoped using it i got this big painfull bumps that literally mess up my face.it’s been 2 month since i stoped using birth control pill and now am trying to work out and stable my hormones naturally but to be honest it hasn’t been goin well for me.my breats hurts so much i have black marks on my face am usually dipressed and dont want to leave home,since i knew about my unbalanced hormones i didn’t almost everything i can but its not effective as it’s written in every book or online pages I’ve read,can u tell me what i should do to balance my hormones? Please help me

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