A combination of approaches is usually the most effective route to take. Lifestyle changes combined with alternative medicine will most likely be the best way to alleviate the symptoms of this hormonal imbalance. However, for some women the symptoms will be so severe that a more drastic treatment is necessary. In taking the leap into pharmaceutical options, side effects are inevitable, yet sometimes they can be worth it if the benefits will outweigh the risks.
It is well known that exercise helps regulate hormone levels. Regular exercise strengthens the endocrine system, which, again, is responsible for the regulation of all hormones. The Pro Health Library cites several studies on hormone imbalance and exercise. In addition to regulating hormone levels, exercise helps strengthen the immune system, combat stress, increase energy and improve overall quality of life. It is important to get 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise each day. This may include jogging, biking, swimming or even a brisk walk.
Experts aren’t sure exactly how hormones impact your brain. What they do know is that changes in estrogen and progesterone can make your head feel “foggy” and make it harder for you to remember things. Some experts think estrogen might impact brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. Attention and memory problems are especially common during perimenopause and menopause. But they can also be a symptom of other hormone-related conditions, like thyroid disease. Let your doctor know if you're having trouble thinking clearly.
Alternative approaches involve little to no risk and can be an extremely effective way to treat all types of hormonal imbalance. This level of approach can involve several different therapies. Herbal remedies are the most prominent; in addition, women may turn to such techniques as acupuncture, biofeedback, massage, aromatherapy, or hypnosis. All of these can be valid and effective options, though most women find that herbal remedies are the easiest alternative treatment to follow, as the others require greater time and monetary commitment. In addition, herbal remedies are the only viable option to treat the hormonal imbalance directly at its source.

I had a total hysterectomy at 36. I’m now 40. I was on the patch felt terrible all the time. Started the hormone pellet therapy and felt better. Every time I go for labs my estrogen is high and my testosterone is high. I have noticed increased belly fat, aging skin, cellulite, tired all the time, irritable, etc etc. I don’t know what to do will stopping all the hormones age me faster. I don’t want to be all wrinkled and saggy at 40! Any advice would be great! Thank you.
Hi am wangechi 23yrs .I have a problem of sleeping too much irregular periods ,I get my periods like today then they disappear for four or even five months then I see them .I am also dry when having sex ,mood swings stressed always sadness I like crying a lot .I went to see a doctor and was tested then he said I have hormonal imbalance I was given herbal tablets but nothing has changed am married now its 2yrs and I have no child and no signs of pregnancy and I have never used any family planning pills or whatever please am confused and I need help on this before it worsen
Hormone-regulating supplements. As the name suggests, this variety of herbs doesn't contain any estrogen. They stimulate a woman's hormone production by nourishing the pituitary and endocrine glands, causing them to more efficiently produce natural hormones. This ultimately results in balancing not only estrogen, but also progesterone and testosterone. Hormone-regulating supplements (e.g., Macafem) can be considered the safest way to treat the symptoms of hormonal imbalance naturally, as the body creates its own hormones and doesn't require any outside assistance.
Most women’s periods come every 21 to 35 days. If yours doesn’t arrive around the same time every month, or you skip some months, it might mean that you have too much or too little of certain hormones (estrogen and progesterone). If you’re in your 40s or early 50s -- the reason can be perimenopause -- the time before menopause. But irregular periods can be a symptom of health problems like polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Talk to your doctor.
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