Progesterone is a hormone commonly prescribed for women with too much estrogen relative to the level of progesterone produced by the body. Progesterone minimizes the stimulating effects of estrogen on coronary arteries, and when given alone or combined with estrogen, it may improve bone mineral density. Progesterone improves sleep, may increase libido, acts as a diuretic, lowers blood pressure, and improves the insulin-glucose balance to facilitate blood glucose control.

To fully understand your hormone health, it certainly helps to know about your endocrine system and how your hormones work together to maintain homeostasis. The endocrine system is in charge of coordinating the relationship between different organs and hormones, which are chemicals that are released into your bloodstream from cells within your endocrine glands.

The use of birth control pills in teenage girls has the potential to raise their risk of breast cancer. It is well established that when girls between the ages of 13 and 18—and to a lesser but still significant degree, up to the age of 21—use birth control pills, their risk of breast cancer can increase by as much as 600 percent. To put it plainly, the earlier a girl begins to use contraceptives, the greater her risk of breast cancer. This may be because the younger the girl, the more undeveloped her breast tissue, and thus the more vulnerable it is to the synthetic hormones contained in the pill. Furthermore, contraceptives work by inhibiting ovulation, which significantly reduces progesterone production and its essential estrogen balancing effects. This is a situation many young women find themselves in: ripe for symptoms of estrogen dominance and vulnerable to long-term risks for breast cancer. (Excerpted from What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Breast Cancer: How Hormone Balance Can Help Save Your Life.)
This web site offers health, wellness, fitness and nutritional information and is provided for informational purposes only. This information is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for, nor does it replace, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, Always speak with your physician or other healthcare professional before taking any medication or nutritional, herbal or homeopathic supplement, or using any treatment for a health problem. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, contact your health care provider promptly. Do not disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking professional advice because of something you have read on this web site. The use of any information provided on this web site is solely at your own risk. Nothing stated or posted on this web site or available through any services offered by Dr. Jolene Brighten, ND and Brighten Wellness, LLC, are intended to be, and must not be taken to be, the practice of medicine. Information provided on this web site DOES NOT create a doctor-patient relationship between you and any doctor affiliated with our web site. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
To balance your hormones naturally, it’s important that you eliminate toxins in your body by avoiding conventional body care products that are made with potentially-harmful chemicals including DEA, parabens, propylene glycol and sodium lauryl sulfate. A better alternative is to use natural products made with ingredients like essential oils, coconut oil, shea butter and castor oil.
Estrogen plays a huge role in ensuring healthy cell growth in every part of the body. When estrogen levels begin to decline during menopause, cell renewal slows and women start to feel old and uncomfortable. By seeking female hormone imbalance treatment in Springville UT, you can reverse this process and enjoy many important health benefits, such as:
Hormones are the body’s chemical messengers, helping to control nearly every physiological process in the body. This includes metabolism, immune functioning, the menstrual cycle, and overall reproductive health, according to Healthline. Therefore, there is a high likelihood that imbalanced hormones might be the underlying cause of many different health conditions.

Hormones are produced in a complex process, but depend on beneficial fats and cholesterol, so lack of these important dietary factors can cause hormone problems simply because the body doesn’t have the building blocks to make them. Toxins containing chemicals that mimic these building blocks or that mimic the hormones themselves are also problematic because the body can attempt to create hormones using the wrong building blocks. Mutant estrogen anyone?
Unless you get 7–8 hours of sleep every night, you’re doing your body no favors. A lack of sleep or disturbing your natural circadian rhythm can be one of the worst habits contributing to a hormone imbalance. How so? Because your hormones work on a schedule! Case in point: Cortisol, the primary “stress hormone,” is regulated at midnight. Therefore, people who go to bed late never truly get a break from their sympathetic flight/fight stress response.

I have read that because the Mirena delivers progesterone to the uterus only, this can cause the body to stop producing it elsewhere, and actually cause progesterone deficiency. I have also read that blood tests only show an incomplete snapshot reading of hormone levels. However, my gp assumes I have adequate progesterone and low estrogen, and has prescribed estradiol. I’m too scared to take it, as my symptoms seem more akin to estrogen dominance.
The 3% of the body made up of polyunsaturated fats contains both Omega-3 fats and Omega-6 fats in about a 50:50 balance. This ratio is extremely important for health, and it is often ignored. Seed based vegetable oils (like canola oil, soybean oil, etc.) are very high in Omega-6 fats and low in Omega-3 fats. Since the 1950s, these seed based oils have replaced many sources of saturated fats and Omega-3s in the diet. This is one of the reasons that most people are not getting enough vital Omega-3 fatty acids from their diet.
Experts say that mood swings and other symptoms do not necessarily indicate abnormal hormone levels. "Every study done on women with PMS shows their circulating levels of hormones are normal," says Nanette Santoro, MD. Santoro is director of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology at Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. "But some researchers believe that certain hormone metabolites in the brain cause the mood changes - or that some women just metabolize hormones differently. No one knows for sure."
Maintaining balanced hormones is complex, as many different factors can contribute to fluctuating hormone levels, especially in women. Throughout the various different stages of life, from puberty to pregnancy to menopause, hormones are naturally in flux. For many of the years in between, however, hormones may flux and become imbalanced as a result of lifestyle and environmental factors, such as high levels of stress, poor sleep, lack of exercise, and an unhealthy diet full of fat and sugar. While all factors are important to consider, monitoring sugar intake is especially key as it relates to women’s hormones.
So, a brain structure called the Hypothalamus controls hormonal secretions from the ovaries and all other glands in the body. It does that by intimate connections with the pituitary gland (the master gland), FYI we are still in the brain. Then the pituitary sends chemical messages broadcasted in the bloodstream to the various glands including the ovaries, thyroid and our stress gland-the adrenal.
Dr. Jolene Brighten is a Functional Medicine Naturopathic Medical Doctor and the founder of Rubus Health, a women’s medicine clinic that specializes in women's hormones. She is recognized as a leading expert in Post-Birth Control Syndrome and the long-term side effects associated with hormonal contraceptives. Dr. Brighten is the best selling author, speaker and regular contributor to several online publications including MindBodyGreen. She is a medical advisor for one of the first data-driven apps to offer women personalized birth control recommendations.
Probiotics: Probiotics can help in repairing your gut lining, which in turn, helps balance your hormones. They not only aid in digestion but can speed weight loss, improve mood, eliminate constipation, and boost the immune system. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that can actually improve your production and regulation of key hormones like insulin, ghrelin and leptin.
"Every woman thinks that it's the sudden drop in estrogen from not ovulating that causes the problems. But in reality, it's the fluctuation of estrogen, along with less progesterone, that is behind many of the typical symptoms of perimenopause," Goldstein says. These symptoms, he tells WebMD, include not only mood swings and sensitivity, but also hot flashes, night sweats, and memory problems.
I had a total hysterectomy at 36. I’m now 40. I was on the patch felt terrible all the time. Started the hormone pellet therapy and felt better. Every time I go for labs my estrogen is high and my testosterone is high. I have noticed increased belly fat, aging skin, cellulite, tired all the time, irritable, etc etc. I don’t know what to do will stopping all the hormones age me faster. I don’t want to be all wrinkled and saggy at 40! Any advice would be great! Thank you.

Magnesium– Magnesium is vital for hundreds of functions within the human body and many of us are deficient in this master mineral (here’s how to tell if you are). There are several different ways to get Magnesium: In powder form with a product like Natural Calm so that you can vary your dose and work up slowly, ionic liquid form can be added to food and drinks and dose can be worked up slowly,or transdermal form by using Magnesium oil applied to the skin (this is my favorite method). Topical application is often the most effective option for those with a damaged digestive tract or severe deficiency.


"Medically speaking, anything that occurs right before your period - such as cramps, diarrhea, and breast tenderness - is considered pre-menstrual syndrome," says Steven R. Goldstein, MD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at NYU Medical Center in New York City. But for most women it's the mood issues that become the defining factor for what we know as PMS." And, says Goldstein, this can include anything from mild to moderate depression, anxiety, mood swings, melancholia, sensitivity, even full-blown anger and self-hatred.
Lavender: Lavender oil promotes emotional balance, as it can help to treat anxiety, depression, moodiness and stress. It can also be used to promote restful sleep, which will help to balance your hormone levels as well. Diffuse 5 drops of lavender oil at home, add 5 drops to a warm water bath or apply 3 drops topically to your temples, back or neck or wrists.

But when you suspect hormone imbalance, mainstream medicine typically runs only basic labs. If your labs don’t come back “normal,” you’re typically given a synthetic hormone cream or pill that could have side effects. If those labs come back “normal” and you’re still experiencing symptoms, you may be told you’re either depressed, just getting older, or need to lose weight.
Alternative approaches involve little to no risk and can be an extremely effective way to treat all types of hormonal imbalance. This level of approach can involve several different therapies. Herbal remedies are the most prominent; in addition, women may turn to such techniques as acupuncture, biofeedback, massage, aromatherapy, or hypnosis. All of these can be valid and effective options, though most women find that herbal remedies are the easiest alternative treatment to follow, as the others require greater time and monetary commitment. In addition, herbal remedies are the only viable option to treat the hormonal imbalance directly at its source.

In the years preceding menopause, a woman may suffer from decreased testosterone as her ovaries and adrenal glands slow the production of sex hormones. This may explain why many women experience a drop in libido during this period of their lives. Excess testosterone, however, may be the result of a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); possible symptoms include irregular periods, male-pattern baldness, a deepening voice, and excess body hair.
For a while now I’ve been reading about the effects of hormonal imbalance in the physical appearance or physique in general… What I’m really concerned about is my broad shoulder which come off too manly and instead of the feminine shape like a normal girl would have…I ofen get insecure because I cannot wear the clothes I want because my shape seem to be too masculine for the attire (as it appears as an inverted triangle rather than an hour glass)… and just recently I checked with my doctor about my irregular menstruation to where she said that I’m having imbalances in my hormones… having too much estrogen than progesterone… Is it possible that my masculine appearance could be attributed to the said hormonal imbalance???…. and could it be addressed by intake of pills???
Get the right tests. Ask your doctor to check your thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH  and free T3 and T4, as well as thyroid antibodies including thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. I cover this extensively in my e-book. Some people may need to dig deeper and get a special test called reverse T3 to learn if something like heavy metals (mercury), pesticides, yeast or nutritional deficiencies like selenium, vitamin D, zinc or even iodine could block thyroid hormone function. Reverse T3 is the brake that stops your thyroid hormone from working at the right times. Unfortunately, toxins and inflammation increase levels of reverse T3. Even if regular thyroid tests appear normal, high levels of reverse T3 mean your thyroid is not working properly!
You might never know this from conventional medicine, which seems to subscribe to the idea that women are destined to suffer throughout their reproductive life. Women suffer from mood and behavior swings resulting from the three P’s: Puberty, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and peri-menopause (the years leading up to and just after their final period), or the three M’s:  menstrual cramps, menopause and mental anxiety!
Most women have menstrual cycles that last between 21 and 35 days. Up to one quarter of women experience irregular periods. This includes having periods that are shorter or longer than usual or periods that are lighter or heavier than usual. Some women who have irregular periods may experience abdominal cramping or a lack of ovulation. Amenorrhea is a medical term that refers to the an absence of periods for at least 3 months even though a woman is not pregnant. Menorrhagia is a disorder that causes excessive menstrual bleeding. Dysmenorrhea causes pain and cramping during periods. Prolonged menstrual bleeding involves periods in which bleeding routinely lasts for 8 days or longer. Oligomenorrhea is a condition in which periods occur infrequently or more than every 35 days. See your doctor if you believe hormonal imbalance is affecting your menstrual cycle.

This primary level of treatment involves the least amount of risk, though conversely it requires the highest amount of self-discipline. Many times some simple changes in lifestyle can reap huge benefits in fighting symptoms caused by hormonal imbalance, and achieving a higher overall level of health. Fundamentally, techniques for stress reduction, such as yoga or meditation, combined with regular exercise and an improved diet, can do a woman great service. Diet in particular is key.
Hi. I’m seeing comments bout people gaining a few pounds from hormone imbalance and having trouble getting it off. I wish that was my problem. I literally gained 60 lbs in 60 days. I went from 125 to 185 in 2 months. I was having and still do horrific hot flashes sudden anxiety depression sluggish brain I can’t sleep . Well I sleep then awaken a few hours later so uncomfortable burning up on the inside I can’t get to a good internal temp and I’m up that’s it. I’m exhausted. I was told I was borderline hypo and was put on Synthroid at 88 mg it did nothing so I doubled it but it made me have headaches so I cut back to 132 and it still is t doing any good . Docs put me in on birth Control for the hot flashes but your article makes it sound like that was a big mistake! It did help a lot but I still do get them and when I do now ( at least

Our clients are never expected to take our advice on faith alone. We are happy to explain the science behind our female hormone imbalance treatment in Philadelphia PA, complete with references to relevant research. We’ve been studying the science of healthy female aging since 1999, and in that time we’ve developed the following protocols to maximize the effects of our treatments while also preserving our clients’ health:
Insulin resistance is linked with many health problems, Type II diabetes, being the most commonly known, but it also leads to an increased risk of breast cancer. Insulin is a growth factor and as we eat more and more carbohydrates and sweets, it rises, and as it does it increases IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor) which stimulates cancer cells. A 2004 study out of Vanderbilt University suggests that insulin resistance and increased IGF-1 synergistically increase the risk for breast cancer. The study found that women with abnormal levels of both had a three-fold rise in the incidence of breast cancer. Two years earlier, Dr. Pamela Goodwin of Mt. Sinai Hospital in Toronto found that women with early stage breast cancer, who were also insulin resistant (as defined by a high fasting insulin level) had a higher rate of cancer spreading to other organs (metastases), and death, compared to those whose insulin levels were normal. Type 2 diabetes, which is essentially advanced insulin resistance, leads to breast cancer—the long-running Nurses Health Study of over 100,000 nurses bears this out. Although some studies have questioned these findings, a combined analysis of 21 studies published in 2004, backs up the trend.
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