I am so tired it’s awful. I am in a stressful situation and I am cold a lot also. I use low dose vaginal progesterone and half a mg. of divigel, I work out and my cortisol is high I think. I try increasing progesterone but get tired on it. Now my breasts are bigger and I am bloated all over. My doctor doesn’t help. I think I have high and low cortisol and I feel like I will never recover from this, help!
Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.
A variety of things may trigger headaches, but a decrease in estrogen levels is a common cause in women. If headaches occur routinely at the same time every month, just prior to or during a period, declining estrogen may be the trigger. If hormonal headaches are particularly bad, a doctor may prescribe birth control pills to keep estrogen levels more stable throughout the cycle. Try over-the-counter pain relievers to ease headache pain. If you need something stronger, a doctor may prescribe a triptan or other medication to treat and prevent headaches. Eating right, exercising, avoiding stress, and getting adequate sleep will help you minimize PMS symptoms and headaches.
In addition, Ruiz says that each cycle in itself is unique, with slightly differing hormone levels. People under 40 years of age who ovulate generally have good-quality eggs, making hormone variation from cycle to cycle pretty steady, he explains. However, as the person approaches menopause, the egg quality is less consistent, resulting in more variation in hormone levels, Ruiz says.
Falling estrogen levels during perimenopause and a lack of estrogen after menopause may lead to vaginal dryness. This makes the wall of the vagina thinner. It can be painful to have sex. A doctor may prescribe synthetic hormones or bioidentical hormones to combat these and other symptoms related to menopause. It's important to take progesterone along with estrogen to decrease certain risks of hormone therapy. Some women are not advised to take it because of an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, blood clots, gall bladder disease, breast cancer, and endometrial cancer. Hormone therapy may be associated with side effects that include headaches, breast tenderness, swelling, mood changes, vaginal bleeding, and nausea.
Clary sage: Clary sage helps to balance estrogen levels because it contains natural phytoestrogens. It can be used to regulate your menstrual cycle, relieve PMS symptoms, treat infertility and PCOS, and even reduce the chances of uterine and ovarian cancer. It also serves as a natural remedy for emotional imbalances, like depression and anxiety. (13) Diffuse 3-5 drops of clary sage to help balance hormone levels and relieve stress. To ease cramps and pain, massage 5 drops of clary sage with 5 drops of coconut oil into your stomach and any other area of concern.
If you think that hormonal imbalance is limited to causing just weight gain and acne, you are overlooking the broader scenario. Hormonal imbalance can cause several nasty symptoms including interrupted menstrual cycle, loss of libido, pain in breasts, PMS, cellulite, excessive exhaustion and even cancer. The symptoms appear in your body much later than the sneaky entry of the problem itself. Therefore, once you start noticing a hint of hormonal imbalance in your body, you should visit a primary care physician in OKC, who can recommend a specialist to cure the imbalance.

The trouble is that polyunsaturated fats are less stable and oxidize easily in the body, which can lead to inflammation and mutations within the body. Emerging evidence suggests that that this inflammation can occur in arterial cells (potentially increasing the chance of clogged arteries), skin cells (leading to skin mutations) and reproductive cells (which may be connected to PCOS and other hormone problems).
"Women can be, and many are, greatly affected by hormone fluctuations. Sometimes it gets to the point of feeling totally overwhelmed - as if for a time they have lost control of their life," says Christiane Northrup, MD, author of The Wisdom of Menopause and Women's Bodies Women's Wisdom.Dieting, stress, anxiety, depression - even exercise -are all among the factors that can create a hormonal tailspin. So there are plenty of opportunities for things to go awry.
I guess this fact was not known by testosterone scientists who came up with the names estrogen and progesterone. Progesterone means to bear, give birth , the word gestation comes from the same root. estrogen means ‘gadfly’ or ‘frenzy’ , also some trace it to the Greek root (oistros) sexual passion and desire. So, according to these scientists, women are either giving birth or in a state of agitation and hysteria or intense sexual desire. You see this is why we should come up with our own scientific names.  This is also why I prefer to refer to these hormones as Ovarian hormones and not sex hormones, in order to not restrict the vastness of their influences.

Despite potential drawbacks, there are some cases in which hormone replacement and medications are helpful and even necessary for women whose symptoms are unmanageable. Occasionally, despite lifestyle therapies – diet, exercise, stress reduction, nutrient supplementation, and herbs – hormone therapy can be lifesaving (as well as mood- and brain-saving).
Falling estrogen levels during perimenopause and a lack of estrogen after menopause may lead to vaginal dryness. This makes the wall of the vagina thinner. It can be painful to have sex. A doctor may prescribe synthetic hormones or bioidentical hormones to combat these and other symptoms related to menopause. It's important to take progesterone along with estrogen to decrease certain risks of hormone therapy. Some women are not advised to take it because of an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, blood clots, gall bladder disease, breast cancer, and endometrial cancer. Hormone therapy may be associated with side effects that include headaches, breast tenderness, swelling, mood changes, vaginal bleeding, and nausea.
I’m struggling with my moods and weight (weight fluctuates a lot) and this seems worse after laparoscopic surgery for endo a couple of months ago. I had a Mirena inserted, but had it removed a couple of weeks after as the side effects were awful. I’ve had horrible pmt for the past 5+years (had endo surgery 20 yrs ago too, and was ok for 10-15yrs) now I seem to get PMT during the middle of my cycle, which has always been fairly regular and not too heavy, but lasts a full 7 days. And also the week before my period. I’d hoped the latest round of surgery, and unsuccessful Mirena, would change things! I take 1-2000mgs of Vit C, SAMe and 5htp daily. Any suggestions on what may help balance me out? I’ve used natural progesterone cream in the past, which did help a bit. Thanks in advance.
Eating a variety of foods high in short, medium and long-chain fatty acids is key to keeping your hormones in check. Your body needs various types of fats to create hormones, including saturated fat and cholesterol. Not only are these essential fats fundamental building blocks for hormone production, but they keep inflammation levels low, boost your metabolism and promote weight loss. Healthy fats have the opposite effect of refined carbohydrates, which lead to inflammation and can mess with the balance of your hormones.
A combination of approaches is usually the most effective route to take. Lifestyle changes combined with alternative medicine will most likely be the best way to alleviate the symptoms of this hormonal imbalance. However, for some women the symptoms will be so severe that a more drastic treatment is necessary. In taking the leap into pharmaceutical options, side effects are inevitable, yet sometimes they can be worth it if the benefits will outweigh the risks.
To balance your hormones naturally, it’s important that you eliminate toxins in your body by avoiding conventional body care products that are made with potentially-harmful chemicals including DEA, parabens, propylene glycol and sodium lauryl sulfate. A better alternative is to use natural products made with ingredients like essential oils, coconut oil, shea butter and castor oil.

Eating a variety of foods high in short, medium and long-chain fatty acids is key to keeping your hormones in check. Your body needs various types of fats to create hormones, including saturated fat and cholesterol. Not only are these essential fats fundamental building blocks for hormone production, but they keep inflammation levels low, boost your metabolism and promote weight loss. Healthy fats have the opposite effect of refined carbohydrates, which lead to inflammation and can mess with the balance of your hormones.

Most people tend to associate sugar as merely a precursor to weight gain, but its effects go way beyond the threat to the waistline. For women especially, a diet full of excessive sugar – which includes all refined carbohydrates, not just the sweet stuff – can lead to significant hormonal imbalance. One of the most notable effects of too much sugar is insulin resistance, according to the Cleveland Clinic.
Hormonal imbalances can occur in men and women of almost any age.1 A variety of factors can be related to these imbalances, including high insulin levels from diets high in refined foods and sugar, exposure to environmental toxins (xenoestrogens), high consumption of hydrogenated fats, and lack of physical activity leading to weight gain.2-5 Age is also a factor in reduced levels of hormones, creating feelings of imbalance in everyday pursuits. For example, testosterone levels in women begin going down after age 20. By age 40 a woman's testosterone level will be half of what it was when she was 20 years old. This is why getting hormone levels checked even while in your 20's may be necessary if you aren't feeling yourself. For women between the ages of 40–60, testosterone levels can remain pretty constant. After menopause testosterone declines once again.1

Urine testing: A urine hormone test requires that you collect every drop of urine for a 24-hour period. Then your urine is tested to identify each hormone that is present and at what levels on that particular day. This is the most extensive hormone health test because it measures your hormone levels throughout the entire day, instead of the levels for a moment in time, which is the case for blood and saliva tests.


Eat right for your thyroid. Limit soybeans, raw kale and other raw cruciferous veggies, which might contain thyroid-blocking compounds called goitrogens. I know this sounds confusing. After all, I usually recommend plenty of cruciferous veggies. In this scenario, I am saying it’s okay to eat them…just not raw!   You should limit the kale juice and kale salad. One study in The New England Journal of Medicine looked at a woman who ate two pounds of raw bok choy a day and went into a hypothyroid coma! I know that sounds extreme, but it could happen. I also recommend wild-caught, low-mercury fish and seaweed for additional iodine, the mineral your thyroid hormones are made from. Since people eat less iodized salt, you might be iodine deficient. Over-exposure to fluoride and chlorine also create iodine deficiencies. Pumpkin seeds and oysters provide excellent zinc sources, and Brazil nuts provide selenium and iodine.
Adaptogen herbs are a unique class of healing plants that promote hormone balance and protect the body from a wide variety of diseases, including those caused by excess stress. In addition to boosting immune function and combating stress, research shows that various adapotogens — such as ashwagandha, medicinal mushrooms, rhodiola and holy basil — can:

Insulin is highly affected by diet because of the many different signals going on throughout the body as a result of the glucose, and resulting energy, that is produced from carbohydrate intake. Once insulin resistance develops, the muscles, fat, and liver cells don’t respond to it properly, leading to a chain reaction in the body, per Healthline. Over time, insulin resistance can lead to serious conditions like diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol, heart disease and even stroke.
I am so tired it’s awful. I am in a stressful situation and I am cold a lot also. I use low dose vaginal progesterone and half a mg. of divigel, I work out and my cortisol is high I think. I try increasing progesterone but get tired on it. Now my breasts are bigger and I am bloated all over. My doctor doesn’t help. I think I have high and low cortisol and I feel like I will never recover from this, help!
Hormone-regulating supplements. As the name suggests, this variety of herbs doesn't contain any estrogen. They stimulate a woman's hormone production by nourishing the pituitary and endocrine glands, causing them to more efficiently produce natural hormones. This ultimately results in balancing not only estrogen, but also progesterone and testosterone. Hormone-regulating supplements (e.g., Macafem) can be considered the safest way to treat the symptoms of hormonal imbalance naturally, as the body creates its own hormones and doesn't require any outside assistance.
There are many types of hormones in the body. Some play key roles in the everyday health and well-being of women, including estrogen, testosterone and progesterone that come from the ovaries. Other hormones include, but are not limited to, thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland, cortisol from the adrenal gland and prolactin from the pituitary gland. When they're in balance, our bodies run smoothly. 
Try your best to get a full night's sleep: A Stanford University study found that habitual sleep restriction (five hours a night as opposed to eight) raised a person's ghrelin levels by nearly 15 percent, lowered leptin levels by 15.5 percent, and was directly associated with increased body weight. Other research has shown that exercise and stress reduction may help keep ghrelin levels in check.
In the meantime, there’s no need to wait on getting started with a diet overhaul. Since high sugar intake along with a highly refined carb/processed food diet are the most common contributors to insulin resistance and hormonal imbalance, making changes to eat “clean” can greatly improve health overall. This includes eating a variety of organic vegetables and fruits, whole grains, low fat dairy products, and lean sources of protein such as fish, suggests Healthline. It is also important to limit caffeine and alcohol consumption, as these can cause cortisol hormones to spike (which can disrupt all other hormone levels).
The 3% of the body made up of polyunsaturated fats contains both Omega-3 fats and Omega-6 fats in about a 50:50 balance. This ratio is extremely important for health, and it is often ignored. Seed based vegetable oils (like canola oil, soybean oil, etc.) are very high in Omega-6 fats and low in Omega-3 fats. Since the 1950s, these seed based oils have replaced many sources of saturated fats and Omega-3s in the diet. This is one of the reasons that most people are not getting enough vital Omega-3 fatty acids from their diet.
Most people tend to associate sugar as merely a precursor to weight gain, but its effects go way beyond the threat to the waistline. For women especially, a diet full of excessive sugar – which includes all refined carbohydrates, not just the sweet stuff – can lead to significant hormonal imbalance. One of the most notable effects of too much sugar is insulin resistance, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

A combination of approaches is usually the most effective route to take. Lifestyle changes combined with alternative medicine will most likely be the best way to alleviate the symptoms of this hormonal imbalance. However, for some women the symptoms will be so severe that a more drastic treatment is necessary. In taking the leap into pharmaceutical options, side effects are inevitable, yet sometimes they can be worth it if the benefits will outweigh the risks.
At Aligned Modern Health, we work with our patients to find those lifestyle factors that are contributing to their imbalances. This starts with a comprehensive blood analysis, followed by a salivary cortisol test to detect adrenal problems. A complete GI panel and tests for food sensitivities will also help pinpoint the cause of the hormone trouble.
If you have hypothyroidism, a daily thyroid hormone replacement pill can help correct the imbalance. You might also want to consider eating more onion. This veggie contains kaempferol, a compound that may kick-start production of the hormone. If you have an overactive thyroid, your doctor may prescribe one of several treatments, from radioactive iodine—to slow hormone production—to surgical removal of the gland; most patients respond well once they get the proper care.
Hi, I went into depression last year after losing my Mum in September after which my body started changing. I’ve experienced increase and tenderness in my breasts, tummy increase, dizziness on and off, headaches on and off, weakness, sadness, loss of appetite, decrease in my hips and butt. All these changes made me loss my self esteem, my clothes don’t fit well. I was prescribed for vitamin E. I need help..

I would love for you guys to email me and give me some advice! I’ve been on the birth control Lo Loestrin Fe now for about 5 years. After a year of taking this I quit having a period altogether. I haven’t had a period in 4 years!! My OBGYN says its normal on this birth control, but it kind of freaks me out. Also I have been miserable with anxiety, mood swings, and depression over the last few years. I just wonder if this birth control has something to do with it all. I want to know what I would feel like if I quit taking it but it scares me, I also really don’t want to get pregnant right now. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!

Help..i been on bhrt since April, take oral prog and T cream and I still don’t feel good. Could I be getting to much or is it because I nay also have hi cortisol and if I so how can I fix that? How is this tested ? I have sleep issues, sweating at night, hi anxiety and feelings in body like almost burning sensation and hands tingling and going numb at times. I started the bhrt bc I was tested thoroughly and told I was low in both prog and T. I had partial hyster so They say my hormones not working right now. Before I got tested i was almost non functional with anxiety and depression and altho the dep is better I still have all.these symptoms. What can or should I do ? My drs just keep changing doses on me. I think maybe too high again. But on all doses I have still struggled with same symptoms. If I have hi cortisol or adrenal issues and that was fixed would I not need the hormones?? Or would need to have both? Can hi cortisol or adrenal issues cause you to become that mentally bad off like I was before? Or could it be both issues .


Hi my name is Sindy, i am 30 yrs old. I have been suffering woth estrogen dominance for over a year now. I took the depo provera shot last year Jan 2017 and only one shot and it changed my life. I am always tired, my body aches and have this dizziness around the time of my periods every month. This is annoying and disturbing my daily life now please help what can i do. I have done test and my Progesterone levels are very low.

My daughter had been on the birth control pills since she was 16 (8 years now) because of cysts in her ovaries. She has had lots of UTIs, about 2 a year since then. 2017 she had 4. The urologist looked closer into it and discovered that they all haven’t been UTIs after all. Most of the cultures came back from the lab as negative. He now saying she has interstitial cystitis. We have notice that most of her bladder flare ups are right before her period. She is in such pain during that time. And I started researching and it seems to me she might have a hormonal imbalance due to the birth control pills. I’m wondering if she gets off the pill if all her problems would go away or would getting off the pill make it worse? I’m thinking the pills has cause her problem? Tell me what you think?
Hi – so my last six months since going off birth control has been awful. I was on bc for 10 years. Went off in 2015 and immeditaely got pregnant with my son -had no complications at all. Then After nursing for nine months went back on bc while I lost some weight. In August I went off birth control to try to get pregnant again. At first I had terrible perioral dermatitis, followed by hives every month. Then I got pregnant in October had terrible hives with swelling and ultimately miscarried due to not enough progesterone. My hives resolved with the miscarriage. Then again in December I got terrible hives and anaphylaxis- in Er with epi to stop the swelling. I found out I was very early (2-3 weeks) pregnant but immediately miscarried again and my progesterone was really low again – at 7 days preg pos blood test – progesterone.19; 3 days later .21 (hcg 7). I started bleeding almost immediately and miscarriage again. Since then I have not let myself get pregnant again – but each month I get hives (Not as bad) and perioral dermatitis. I’ve seen functional doctors and my inflammation is terrible – my progesterone at 7 days post ovulation was under .5. My testosterone was also low. And my estrogen is also low – and estridol and estrone ratio is backwards. I may also have PCOS. I have Hashimotos hypothyroidism. I suffer from terrible periods,spotting, pain, headaches and consfipation. I feel that my low hormones are the root of all my problems but don’t know how to fix it. Do you have any suggestions or ideas of what else I could do or what is happening to me?
Experts aren’t sure exactly how hormones impact your brain. What they do know is that changes in estrogen and progesterone can make your head feel “foggy” and make it harder for you to remember things. Some experts think estrogen might impact brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. Attention and memory problems are especially common during perimenopause and menopause. But they can also be a symptom of other hormone-related conditions, like thyroid disease. Let your doctor know if you're having trouble thinking clearly.
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