Maintaining balanced hormones is complex, as many different factors can contribute to fluctuating hormone levels, especially in women. Throughout the various different stages of life, from puberty to pregnancy to menopause, hormones are naturally in flux. For many of the years in between, however, hormones may flux and become imbalanced as a result of lifestyle and environmental factors, such as high levels of stress, poor sleep, lack of exercise, and an unhealthy diet full of fat and sugar. While all factors are important to consider, monitoring sugar intake is especially key as it relates to women’s hormones.

But when you suspect hormone imbalance, mainstream medicine typically runs only basic labs. If your labs don’t come back “normal,” you’re typically given a synthetic hormone cream or pill that could have side effects. If those labs come back “normal” and you’re still experiencing symptoms, you may be told you’re either depressed, just getting older, or need to lose weight.


Physical activity is important to hormone balance, not to mention overall health and a good mental state. Exercise helps to keep cortisol levels low and also helps maintain hormone balance by reducing the level of cortisol in the body and sustaining serum insulin levels. Cortisol levels can become significantly high when the body is experiencing stress, either real or imagined.17 Exercise helps counter the effects of stress and regular moderate exercise can lower cortisol levels.18-20 Moderate exercise for 30 to 60 minutes each day can have a profound effect on hormone balance.21-23
If you can't sleep or you don't get good quality sleep, hormone balance may be to blame. Progesterone is one compound released by the ovaries that helps you sleep. Low levels may make it difficult to fall and stay asleep. A small study in postmenopausal women found that 300 milligrams of progesterone restored normal sleep when sleep was disturbed. Estrogen levels decrease in perimenopause and after menopause. This may contribute to night sweats and hot flashes, which often disrupt a woman's ability to sleep. See your doctor if you believe an imbalance in hormones is contributing to sleep problems.

A professional writer since 2008, Tracey Planinz writes articles on natural health, nutrition and fitness. She holds a doctorate and two professional certifications in her field, and continues to develop her education with additional classes and seminars. She has provided natural health consultations and private fitness instruction for clients in her local community.

We have no idea which hormone is being released at this moment. They are invisible and work in silence. Unfortunately, we don’t appreciate their diligence to maintain things in homeostasis, and when hormones feel under-appreciated, they become less silent and demand to be visible, they scream for attention.  Hormones move from the unknown to the known. A diabetic, spends her entire life unaware of what her pancreas is doing, unaware of the hormone Insulin, and then upon diagnosis, she has to make sure that her insulin levels are visible to her at all times, otherwise she might go into a coma and even die. It is a similar story with Ovarian hormones too.
Hello, my name is jessica. Im 17 years old. I am currently on the nexplanon implant for birth control and ive noticed since ive been on it (almost 3 years) ive had so much anxiety and depression. I was wondering if that was due to the birth control and if i get it taken out would my emotions go back to normal because i never had these issues before. Ive been on so many different websites looking for answers and cant get any. Is there a certain amount of time it takes after the birth control is taken out for my emotions to go back to normal?
Eat right for your thyroid. Limit soybeans, raw kale and other raw cruciferous veggies, which might contain thyroid-blocking compounds called goitrogens. I know this sounds confusing. After all, I usually recommend plenty of cruciferous veggies. In this scenario, I am saying it’s okay to eat them…just not raw!   You should limit the kale juice and kale salad. One study in The New England Journal of Medicine looked at a woman who ate two pounds of raw bok choy a day and went into a hypothyroid coma! I know that sounds extreme, but it could happen. I also recommend wild-caught, low-mercury fish and seaweed for additional iodine, the mineral your thyroid hormones are made from. Since people eat less iodized salt, you might be iodine deficient. Over-exposure to fluoride and chlorine also create iodine deficiencies. Pumpkin seeds and oysters provide excellent zinc sources, and Brazil nuts provide selenium and iodine.
Our clients are never expected to take our advice on faith alone. We are happy to explain the science behind our female hormone imbalance treatment in Philadelphia PA, complete with references to relevant research. We’ve been studying the science of healthy female aging since 1999, and in that time we’ve developed the following protocols to maximize the effects of our treatments while also preserving our clients’ health:
Eat right for your thyroid. Limit soybeans, raw kale and other raw cruciferous veggies, which might contain thyroid-blocking compounds called goitrogens. I know this sounds confusing. After all, I usually recommend plenty of cruciferous veggies. In this scenario, I am saying it’s okay to eat them…just not raw!   You should limit the kale juice and kale salad. One study in The New England Journal of Medicine looked at a woman who ate two pounds of raw bok choy a day and went into a hypothyroid coma! I know that sounds extreme, but it could happen. I also recommend wild-caught, low-mercury fish and seaweed for additional iodine, the mineral your thyroid hormones are made from. Since people eat less iodized salt, you might be iodine deficient. Over-exposure to fluoride and chlorine also create iodine deficiencies. Pumpkin seeds and oysters provide excellent zinc sources, and Brazil nuts provide selenium and iodine.
“Brain fog” is a common complaint even though this is not a true medical term. It is a commonly reported symptom with many potential underlying causes. Women in perimenopause and after menopause report more memory complaints and difficulty concentrating than premenopausal women. Declining estrogen levels may be to blame, but other factors may play a role. Perimenopausal and post-menopausal women often have trouble sleeping and experience hot flashes and increased depression. These, in turn, may contribute to brain fog. Thyroid disease is another common cause of brain fog. See your doctor if you are experiencing brain fog so you can find out and treat the root cause. If declining estrogen levels are to blame, hormone replacement therapy may offer some relief and restore hormonal balance.
A variety of things may trigger headaches, but a decrease in estrogen levels is a common cause in women. If headaches occur routinely at the same time every month, just prior to or during a period, declining estrogen may be the trigger. If hormonal headaches are particularly bad, a doctor may prescribe birth control pills to keep estrogen levels more stable throughout the cycle. Try over-the-counter pain relievers to ease headache pain. If you need something stronger, a doctor may prescribe a triptan or other medication to treat and prevent headaches. Eating right, exercising, avoiding stress, and getting adequate sleep will help you minimize PMS symptoms and headaches.
Ashwagandha, in particular, can be extremely effective at balancing hormones. It benefits thyroid function because it promotes the scavenging of free radicals that cause cellular damage. Ashwagandha can be used to support a sluggish or overactive thyroid, and it can also help to overcome adrenal fatigue. Your adrenals can become overtaxed when you experience too much emotional, physical or mental stress, leading to the disruption of hormones like adrenaline, cortisol and progesterone. (9)
People going through menopause transition or menopause may experience symptoms of hormonal imbalance, Lo explains. Estrogen changes during menopause can impact our brain chemicals; for example, decreasing levels of estrogen can trigger hot flashes and night sweats, she says. This can also result in some people experiencing memory problems or feelings of “fogginess” as well as moodiness, feelings of depression, poor sleep quality, decreased sex drive and vaginal dryness, Lo adds.
Why is it that so many people struggle with weight fluctuations?  Why is the scale so merciless folks are starving themselves and working so hard?  It’s because they are starving themselves and working so hard.  The body experiences these challenges as stress.  And when the body is stressed, it produces more cortisol.  Cortisol tells your body to hang on to that fat because it’s a great storage form of energy.
The content of this website is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any medical condition, nor should it be used as a substitute for medical advice from a qualified physician. The information contained herein is presented in summary form only. It should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice from a physician. Only a qualified physician can determine if you qualify for treatment.
Strength training is your best friend when trying to boost testosterone! Magnesium is also a true testosterone booster. So make sure to eat plenty of dark leafy greens (spinach, swiss chard, kale, watercress and collard greens), pumpkin seeds, fish (mackerel, pollock, turbot and tuna are excellent!), avocado, unroasted nuts (Brasil, almonds, cashews, pecans and walnuts), bananas, and dark chocolate.

Could hormonal imbalance cause lightheaded sensation and feeling faint? I’ve been checked out for every other possible cause, but nothing comes back with an answer. My neck and shoulders feel sore and the back of head feels heavy. Had MRI’S, CT scans, all negative. Starting to think its something with the natural chemicals. Suggestions appreciated.


I get really weak in the days after my period. My ankles feel like they are being squeezed my upper legs pain me I feel like there is somebody squeezing the side of my head. It’s like I have some kind of fluid retention. The day starts okay and then as the day goes on I just get more and more tired. For the other 2 1/2 weeks in the month I am absolutely fine. I have tried evening primrose Oil and I eat lots of greens. I want to live but during the week after my period I simply don’t have the energy to do it ! Any suggestions I have been to doctors lots of times and they say that there is no physical reason why it is happening and that it is all in my mind. I’m not depressed I’m perfectly happy in the world I want to live but I just can’t And literally have to lie down
The trouble is that polyunsaturated fats are less stable and oxidize easily in the body, which can lead to inflammation and mutations within the body. Emerging evidence suggests that that this inflammation can occur in arterial cells (potentially increasing the chance of clogged arteries), skin cells (leading to skin mutations) and reproductive cells (which may be connected to PCOS and other hormone problems).
If you’re experiencing symptoms of menopause, you may be tempted to try a home testing kit. Home testing kits measure follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in your urine. FSH levels increase when you enter menopause, but levels also rise and fall during a normal menstrual cycle. This test can give you an indication of whether menopause has started, but it can’t tell you conclusively.
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