The food you choose to eat can have a major impact on your health. If your diet is high in sugar, processed carbohydrates, hydrogenated fats, genetically modified foods, and conventional beef, dairy, and poultry, then you are more susceptible to obesity and all the associated diseases, plus an increase in hormonal imbalances.6-11 It's important to maintain a healthy weight, as storing excess fat can lead to hormone imbalances and an increase in stored environmental toxins. Toxins have a negative impact on overall health and should be avoided at all ages of life, especially during pregnancy where the developing baby can carry the negative impact the rest of its life.12-15
But what about natural testosterone, made by our own bodies? Well, we know that one hormone doesn’t exist in isolation in the body. For example, in a study of breast cancer risk and natural hormone levels in postmenopausal women (J Natl Cancer Inst 2003;95(16):1218-26) risk increased as body mass index increased. However, even though testosterone levels were higher in the obese women, their estrogen levels were higher still. Fatty tissue converts testosterone into estrogens, using an enzyme called aromatase, so obese postmenopausal women tend to have higher estrogen levels than lean women. The study found that it was the higher estrogen levels that accounted for the increased breast cancer risk while the higher testosterone levels had a negligible impact on risk. Another study of natural hormone levels and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women (Br J Cancer 1997; 76(3):401-5) also found that estradiol levels were more strongly associated with breast cancer risk than testosterone. The same investigators had similar results when they studied premenopausal women, in whom high estradiol (the most potent of the estrogens) and low progesterone levels were more often seen than high testosterone levels in women who developed breast cancer. In addition, women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), who tend to have higher than normal testosterone levels, do not have a higher rate of breast cancer than women without PCOS. So the testosterone circulating naturally in our bodies certainly does not seem to be the prime culprit in breast cancer risk.
Interventions at the third level involve the highest risk and often the highest costs. The most common drug therapy for treating mood swings in the U.S. is HRT. This may be a quick and intense way to combat the underlying hormonal imbalance; unfortunately, it entails serious side effects and increases the risk of different types of cancer among women, as the following study has proven.

I would love for you guys to email me and give me some advice! I’ve been on the birth control Lo Loestrin Fe now for about 5 years. After a year of taking this I quit having a period altogether. I haven’t had a period in 4 years!! My OBGYN says its normal on this birth control, but it kind of freaks me out. Also I have been miserable with anxiety, mood swings, and depression over the last few years. I just wonder if this birth control has something to do with it all. I want to know what I would feel like if I quit taking it but it scares me, I also really don’t want to get pregnant right now. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!


The information provided on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem. You should not stop taking any medication without first consulting your physician.
If you're concerned about low libido, try incorporating more zinc-rich foods—like oysters and sesame seeds—into your diet (zinc appears to be linked to an increase in testosterone levels), and ask your doctor about testosterone supplementation. To treat PCOS, your doctor might recommend taking birth control pills containing synthetic hormones that reduce the production of testosterone. It's also important to avoid refined sugars and other carbohydrates in your diet (insulin resistance is linked to a boost in testosterone production) and to eat more fiber (which counteracts blood sugar spikes and promotes the excretion of excess sugars from the body).
Hi, I have a few questions. I am 20 yrs old and for the last 6 months my body has been completely changing and I’m not sure why. When I was 12 I started taking the birth control pill, I never had any issues, my period was always very light. When I turned 14 I became pregnant and had my daughter when I was 15. After I had her I got the depo shot. I never had my period. After about a year and a half I started to get really bad migraines to the point I couldn’t go a day without taking 4 excedrin. It got so bad I would get sick to my stomach. I then got the implant. I had that for a year and then all of a sudden I got my period every day for 3 months straight and my hair started to fall out. I haven’t been on any birth control for about a year. My period became pretty normal. But recently, about 5 months ago I took a plan b pill which made my period worse. I was sick for 3 days and constantly had headaches again. My period would be so heavy and I had the worst stomach pains. About a month after that I tried to get back on the pill. I took it for a week but started feeling nauses all the time. So I stopped taking it. Now within the last couple months I have gained and lost so much weight I’ve had to go back and forth buying different size Jeans and bras. My boobs have gone up a whole cup size, I went from a size 9 jeans, to a 1, and now I’m just in a 5. I’m not gaining any weight in my stomach or side area. Only up top and lower. I’ve been experiencing all of these symptoms, hot flashes, cold hands and feet, sleeping to much or not enough. My mood swings are all over the place. I space out all the time forgetting little things, mainly when driving I tend to lose focus and forget where I’m going or that I’m even driving. Any time I have sex I get a horrible pain that I can’t take to keep going and start to bleed right after. My periods are so unpredictable. I’ll get it for one day and it wont come back for a week. Its always heavy too. My body had been cramping and hurting so much more. Constantly cracking or feeling stiff. I’ve been getting migraines again. And just lost all motivation to do anything. I struggle with going to see my daughter when I get off work. I just haven’t been feeling myself. I know stress and change of life style is a big part of this. But honestly I thought things were getting better. I never ate right before all of this, my life went completely down hill in the worst ways. But within the last year everything has been going good. Compared to before. I’ve been eating healthier, I’m in a great relationship. I’ve been working the same job for the last 3 years. My boyfriend and I just bought our first house. Therefore I cant say I had any major stress or depression issues again until I started noticing these changes in my body. So basically is there any thing you can think of to why my body would be acting this way? Could it be because of not taking birth control since I was for so long. Or because I’ve tried so many different ones and none of them did any good for my body? It’s really been getting the best of me, physically and mentally.
Sleep helps keep stress hormones balanced, builds energy and allows the body to recover properly. Excessive stress and poor sleep are linked with higher levels of morning cortisol, decreased immunity, trouble with work performance, and a higher susceptibility to anxiety, weight gain and depression. To maximize hormone function, ideally try to get to bed by 10 p.m. and stick with a regular sleep-wake-cycle as much as possible.

At Aligned Modern Health, we work with our patients to find those lifestyle factors that are contributing to their imbalances. This starts with a comprehensive blood analysis, followed by a salivary cortisol test to detect adrenal problems. A complete GI panel and tests for food sensitivities will also help pinpoint the cause of the hormone trouble.
There has been a lot of controversy surrounding estrogen replacement, and unfortunately many doctors are still as confused as their patients on this subject. You need to see a doctor that really understands healthy aging for women and has kept up with all the latest advancements in the science of safe and effective female hormone imbalance treatment in Springville UT. This is what we offer at Renew Youth. Here’s what sets our treatment apart from the crowd:
Both men and women are subject to irregularities related to their sex hormones.  And both men and women have relatively appropriate levels of estrogen, progesterone, DHEA and testosterone.  Women that are experiencing irregular menses (too long, too short, unpredictable, heavy bleeding or cramping, etc.) are more clearly demonstrating some type of abnormality in the quality, quantity or function of their sex hormones.  Although women have a more obvious gauge of hormone balance with their monthly menses, both sexes can experience sexual dysfunction or issues with libido (sexual desire) due to the complex intricacies and interactions of these powerful substances.
He explains that in a normal menstruating person, the first half of the cycle, (called the follicular phase) is dominated by estrogen. Then, the second half of the cycle (called the luteal phase) is dominated by progesterone. “The luteal phase has both estrogen and progesterone,” he notes. “If there is no pregnancy, the egg dies and the corpus luteum stops producing hormones, hormone levels drop to near zero and this triggers a period.”

Are you ready to take the next step towards healing and experiencing optimal health? Search by your city and state or zip code, and we'll provide a list of BioTE Medical providers near you. With thousands of BioTE Medical providers throughout the country, you'll likely have several options for bio-identical hormone replacement therapy providers near you.

If you are overweight, you may have elevated estrogen levels; fat cells actually produce the hormone, so extra weight can lead to too much estrogen in the body. This can be a serious problem because excess estrogen can fuel breast and uterine cancers. During menopause, on the other hand, all women experience a natural drop in estrogen levels, along with side effects that range from hot flashes to headaches to joint pain.
Hormonal imbalances can occur in men and women of almost any age.1 A variety of factors can be related to these imbalances, including high insulin levels from diets high in refined foods and sugar, exposure to environmental toxins (xenoestrogens), high consumption of hydrogenated fats, and lack of physical activity leading to weight gain.2-5 Age is also a factor in reduced levels of hormones, creating feelings of imbalance in everyday pursuits. For example, testosterone levels in women begin going down after age 20. By age 40 a woman's testosterone level will be half of what it was when she was 20 years old. This is why getting hormone levels checked even while in your 20's may be necessary if you aren't feeling yourself. For women between the ages of 40–60, testosterone levels can remain pretty constant. After menopause testosterone declines once again.1
The information provided on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem. You should not stop taking any medication without first consulting your physician.
day, I am at my 30s few years I suffer from delay Mestration but now God has restore me and for the past few months my circle is normal but I am loosing weight and getting thinner,i notice that if I take some appetizers drug or blood tonic I eat much and gain weight and my menstrual cycle stop but if I stop taking appetizers multivitamin tonic my menstrual cycle would be normal,please help me’ now that my circle are normal I am loosing weight and getting thinner.am I suffering from hormones imbalance?i am loosing my mind….i would be grateful to hear from you, Godbless
It’s not “all in your head”.  Neuroendocrinology is the study of the intimate relationship of the neurotransmitters, or chemical messengers of the brain, and hormones.  Excess adrenal stimulation due to the outrageous stress that we subject ourselves to has become a silent epidemic.  Cortisol and norepinephrine, produced and released by the adrenal glands, often underlie the feelings that you may perceive as anxiety.
Fatigue is a common symptom that may have many potential underlying causes. Just as too little progesterone can make it hard to sleep, too much progesterone can make you more tired. Another common hormonal imbalance that causes fatigue is low thyroid hormone levels (hypothyroidism). This condition is easily diagnosed with a blood test. If your levels are low, you can take prescription medication to bring your levels back up to normal. Regardless of any hormone imbalance that may exist, practice good sleep hygiene to optimize your sleep. This involves going to bed and waking up at the same time every day, even on the weekends. Avoid alcohol, caffeine, and exercise from the late afternoon on to avoid interfering with sleep. Establish a relaxing nighttime routine to give your body the message that it's time for sleep. Take a warm bath, sip a cup of chamomile tea, or listen to relaxing music.

I am so glad I have found this website. I think my hormones have been a bit off since college (10 years ago) but I started with a bad depression about 6-7 years ago then after I had my first child (3 years ago) everything changed. I started to get stiff while I was pregnant towards the end. After I had him I couldn’t focus and felt foggy. I continued with stiffness, night sweats, irritability, moodiness, depression, and basically all of the symtoms of estrogen dominance. After my second child the concentration and memory got a lot worse. I have been seeing holistic doctors for about 3 years now and they go back and forth with chronic infections. All of my symtoms get worse around my cycle so I felt it had to be hormonal. I finally got a hormone test and all of them were generally low, but progesterone was really low and estrogen on the low side of normal. Pregnenolone was virtually absent. My cortisol was low as well. My three biggest symptoms are depression/anxiety, brain fog/ADD symptoms, and blood sugar imbalance. Oh and I have acne at 30 like I’m 15 again 🙁 I feel like I have tried quite a few detoxes and resets but I can’t eat the way I’m supposed to because I feel shaky and jittery the whole time, which then throws my mood off. Can a reproductive endocrinologist help with this? I am willing to try anything lifestyle and diet, but I’m hesitant because I feel like nothing has worked yet. Anyone in a similar boat? Thanks


Weight gain is a common indication of excessive estrogen production in men, especially in the chest area. This can lead to condition called gynecomastia, or development of breasts in men. This frequently happens in men struggling with obesity because estrogen can be produced by fat cells, leading to a cycle of overproduction that can quickly become vicious and difficult to break out of without pharmacological intervention. Sexual dysfunction is another common symptom.
Probiotics: Probiotics can help in repairing your gut lining, which in turn, helps balance your hormones. They not only aid in digestion but can speed weight loss, improve mood, eliminate constipation, and boost the immune system. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that can actually improve your production and regulation of key hormones like insulin, ghrelin and leptin.
Thyroid hormone regulates how fast you burn calories. One in ten women doesn't produce enough of it—a condition known as hypothyroidism, which can lead to weight gain, depression, and fatigue. On the other end of the spectrum is hyperthyroidism, in which the thyroid gland releases too much of its hormone, causing symptoms such as anxiety, a racing heart, excessive sweating, even diarrhea.

Please I seem a bit confused of the changes am experiencing its been two weeks now am having this symptoms, during my ovulation I had this full breast and erect nipple which lasted for three days after some days I saw my menses which was a bit abnormal immediately after my menses the full breast started again with erect nipple and unstable sharp pain which comes and goes after a week of this my menses started again this time it was dropping at the same time it will stop and start again. after which making it two weeks the menses started pouring and weakening my right hand, am having this fullness mostly at my right breast but the sharp pain affect both breast sometimes but more on the right side what could be the cause


Hello! I’m 43 years old.i have an 8yr history with hormonal imbalance.it started with me getting periods every 15days. When I went to the doctor she said I had a cyst in my ovary. Over the years it just kept getting from bad to worse with me getting periods within 15 days to now when I don’t get a period for 3-6months..! Two years ago my doctor decided to put a marena for me and soon after that I started to put on weight and had a total loss of libido. I got it removed after 4 months. So now I have weight that I gained since the marena which is around my belly and mentally I feel like I’m going crazy most of the time! Very extreme emotions of sadness,depression etc
Fatigue is a common symptom that may have many potential underlying causes. Just as too little progesterone can make it hard to sleep, too much progesterone can make you more tired. Another common hormonal imbalance that causes fatigue is low thyroid hormone levels (hypothyroidism). This condition is easily diagnosed with a blood test. If your levels are low, you can take prescription medication to bring your levels back up to normal. Regardless of any hormone imbalance that may exist, practice good sleep hygiene to optimize your sleep. This involves going to bed and waking up at the same time every day, even on the weekends. Avoid alcohol, caffeine, and exercise from the late afternoon on to avoid interfering with sleep. Establish a relaxing nighttime routine to give your body the message that it's time for sleep. Take a warm bath, sip a cup of chamomile tea, or listen to relaxing music.
Hello! I’m 43 years old.i have an 8yr history with hormonal imbalance.it started with me getting periods every 15days. When I went to the doctor she said I had a cyst in my ovary. Over the years it just kept getting from bad to worse with me getting periods within 15 days to now when I don’t get a period for 3-6months..! Two years ago my doctor decided to put a marena for me and soon after that I started to put on weight and had a total loss of libido. I got it removed after 4 months. So now I have weight that I gained since the marena which is around my belly and mentally I feel like I’m going crazy most of the time! Very extreme emotions of sadness,depression etc
Simply put, PMS, menopausal symptoms, and other problems are all signs of imbalances in your sex hormones. They are not the result of mutant genes that destroy our sexual vitality as we age. Instead, they are treatable symptoms of underlying imbalance in one of the core systems in your body. Get your sex hormones back in balance, and these problems will usually disappear.
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If you're concerned about low libido, try incorporating more zinc-rich foods—like oysters and sesame seeds—into your diet (zinc appears to be linked to an increase in testosterone levels), and ask your doctor about testosterone supplementation. To treat PCOS, your doctor might recommend taking birth control pills containing synthetic hormones that reduce the production of testosterone. It's also important to avoid refined sugars and other carbohydrates in your diet (insulin resistance is linked to a boost in testosterone production) and to eat more fiber (which counteracts blood sugar spikes and promotes the excretion of excess sugars from the body).
Of course, there is little mid-life women can do to reverse normal physiology and aging ovaries, although they can diligently guard against undue stress that can speed up the process. But growing numbers of younger women are showing signs of estrogen dominance as a result of anovulatory cycles (failure to ovulate) linked to an unbalanced lifestyle: chronic stress, crash diets, exposure to synthetic hormones used in birth control pills, and growth hormones in feedlot beef and dairy products, as well as xenoestrogens found in numerous personal hygiene and household products.
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