Fatigue, mood instability, weight gain, foggy brain/memory loss, adult acne, hair loss/facial hair, lower sex drive, extreme PMS slide. These symptoms do not just reduce quality of life but they also increase chances of stroke, heart disease, cancer and of course gynecological problems (endometriosis, fibroid, tumors and cysts). There are solutions, don't just acquiesce to lower quality of life. And even if you accept such low standards of functionality, this might amount to truncating your life.  

Beauty products are another source of chemical exposure for many people. There are tens of thousands of chemicals in the personal care products we encounter daily, and most of these chemicals have not been tested for long-term safety. Avoiding these products can make a tremendous difference in achieving hormone balance. Start by making simple switches like homemade deodorant, and homemade lotion and even DIY makeup if you’re feeling adventurous. Check out my full index of natural beauty recipes here.


Cancer-causing toxins accumulate in body fat—the more body fat the more room for stored toxins. We can excrete these by losing weight and eating fiber that binds up toxins and escorts them out of the body. Fat cells also contain the enzyme aromatase, which converts testosterone to estrogens. This is why overweight and obese women have more estrogen. The more estrogen produced in the breast tissue, the more chance of stimulating the growth of breast cancer cells. Fat also produces substances called cytokines that are inflammatory in nature. A whole host of diseases including cancers of the breast and prostate are aided and abetted by silent inflammation.
Dr. Jolene Brighten is a Functional Medicine Naturopathic Medical Doctor and the founder of Rubus Health, a women’s medicine clinic that specializes in women's hormones. She is recognized as a leading expert in Post-Birth Control Syndrome and the long-term side effects associated with hormonal contraceptives. Dr. Brighten is the best selling author, speaker and regular contributor to several online publications including MindBodyGreen. She is a medical advisor for one of the first data-driven apps to offer women personalized birth control recommendations.
Help..i been on bhrt since April, take oral prog and T cream and I still don’t feel good. Could I be getting to much or is it because I nay also have hi cortisol and if I so how can I fix that? How is this tested ? I have sleep issues, sweating at night, hi anxiety and feelings in body like almost burning sensation and hands tingling and going numb at times. I started the bhrt bc I was tested thoroughly and told I was low in both prog and T. I had partial hyster so They say my hormones not working right now. Before I got tested i was almost non functional with anxiety and depression and altho the dep is better I still have all.these symptoms. What can or should I do ? My drs just keep changing doses on me. I think maybe too high again. But on all doses I have still struggled with same symptoms. If I have hi cortisol or adrenal issues and that was fixed would I not need the hormones?? Or would need to have both? Can hi cortisol or adrenal issues cause you to become that mentally bad off like I was before? Or could it be both issues .

But when you suspect hormone imbalance, mainstream medicine typically runs only basic labs. If your labs don’t come back “normal,” you’re typically given a synthetic hormone cream or pill that could have side effects. If those labs come back “normal” and you’re still experiencing symptoms, you may be told you’re either depressed, just getting older, or need to lose weight.

However, my problem is that I still experience the pain that I used to experience before taking the pills and I still take pain killers every month. I’ve realized also that I seem to experiencing the burning sensation on underneath my feet as well as the tingling sensation on other parts of my body. I’m scared to stop taking the pills because the doctor told me that if I stop the endo will come back and this is the only way to stop it. Iv stopped taking them before for a short while without my doctors permission and I still experienced a lot of pain. I get depressed and sometimes feel hopeless and stuck. Is there a way you can help me. I’m still taking vissane dienogest.


Instead of immediately resorting to a hormone replacement (which might be your conventional doctor’s first line of treatment), you need to figure out the “why” – what is causing the symptoms.  If you find that you do need hormones, then you need to find the way to replace them that most aligns with your body – low dose, topical, bio-identical, short duration.
Simply put, PMS, menopausal symptoms, and other problems are all signs of imbalances in your sex hormones. They are not the result of mutant genes that destroy our sexual vitality as we age. Instead, they are treatable symptoms of underlying imbalance in one of the core systems in your body. Get your sex hormones back in balance, and these problems will usually disappear.
Instead of immediately resorting to a hormone replacement (which might be your conventional doctor’s first line of treatment), you need to figure out the “why” – what is causing the symptoms.  If you find that you do need hormones, then you need to find the way to replace them that most aligns with your body – low dose, topical, bio-identical, short duration.
Natural Progesterone Cream– PMS and menstrual troubles are often linked to specific hormone imbalances. Especially for those with short cycles or short second phase of their cycle (ovulation through start of menses), progesterone can be the issue. I’ve seen people add only natural progesterone cream and see symptoms greatly reduce. If you do use progesterone cream, do you own research, make sure you have a good brand that is soy-free and only use for the second half of your cycle (ovulation through menses). Check with a doctor or professional before using any hormone supplement.
Avoid using anything that contains harmful chemicals. This includes your cosmetics and body care products. Remember, your skin will absorb whatever you apply to it. Do not use any products that contain potentially harmful chemicals like sodium lauryl sulfate, parabens, DEA, and propylene glycol. You must also be well aware of the effects of any medications or birth control pills on your health and hormones.

Therefore we encourage you to take our 5-minutes quiz first. Over 36.000 women took this quiz before you. It will teach you a lot about your hormonal imbalances. Your hormones dictate virtually every part of your life: from your state of mind to your behavior, body shape, eating habits and even your reaction to stress. You can only live a happy and healthy life if your hormones are balanced.
If you are overweight, you may have elevated estrogen levels; fat cells actually produce the hormone, so extra weight can lead to too much estrogen in the body. This can be a serious problem because excess estrogen can fuel breast and uterine cancers. During menopause, on the other hand, all women experience a natural drop in estrogen levels, along with side effects that range from hot flashes to headaches to joint pain.
Are you aware of your medication’s side effects? Some can disrupt your hormone balance, leading to side effects like fatigue, appetite changes, altered sleeping patterns, low libido, sadness and even depression. Some medications that can mess with your hormone balance include corticosteroids, stimulants, statins, dopamine agonists, rexinoids and glucocorticoids. Beware of your medications, talk to your doctor about the side effects and research natural alternatives whenever possible.

Falling estrogen levels during perimenopause and a lack of estrogen after menopause may lead to vaginal dryness. This makes the wall of the vagina thinner. It can be painful to have sex. A doctor may prescribe synthetic hormones or bioidentical hormones to combat these and other symptoms related to menopause. It's important to take progesterone along with estrogen to decrease certain risks of hormone therapy. Some women are not advised to take it because of an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, blood clots, gall bladder disease, breast cancer, and endometrial cancer. Hormone therapy may be associated with side effects that include headaches, breast tenderness, swelling, mood changes, vaginal bleeding, and nausea.
Because all the systems in the body are interconnected, if you have one hormone problem, you might have other ones as well. In other words, to say you have only one of these seven issues might be oversimplification – it could be all of these issues or a combination of some of these. It’s important to work with your health care provider to find out what hormone issues might actually be at play.
First week of July I was diagnosed again of having hemorrhagic cyst on both of my ovaries. That was the only time that an obygene confirmed that im having this so called hormonal imbalance, and it cause me my acne breakout, weight gain, anxiety, sleepless night etc,! I don’t know how to start to fight my condition. I lost my self steam by looking at my face full of acne for a long time now. I have read your article and I was enlightened. I just need someone to push me and tell me it’s not too late I can still do something for my condition. Thanks for your very reliable article. It’s been helpful.
In 1991 The National Institute of Health (NIH) launched the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), the largest clinical trial ever undertaken in the United States. The WHI was designed to provide answers concerning possible benefits and risks associated with use of HRT. This study was canceled in July 2002, after it was proven that synthetic hormones increase risks of ovarian and breast cancer as well as heart disease, blood clots, and strokes. The findings were published in JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association, and to this date have not been disputed.
We balance all hormones, not just estrogen: The results of age-related estrogen decline cannot be corrected simply by adding more estrogen to the body. This is why our female hormone imbalance treatment in Philadelphia PA addresses all the hormones that affect menopause and aging, such as estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, thyroid, cortisol, DHEA, and growth hormone.

I am a fairly healthy 22 year old female and I recently got bacterial vaginosis, however I am not sexually active. The fact that there’s no known cause to this vaginal ph imbalance has made my head spin. I was looking deeper into my sleeping habits and I have pretty out of whack sleeping patterns. I sleep at unreasonable hours and usually skimp on hours. Does this cause hormonal imbalances which in result has disrupted my vaginal ph?Or perhaps it’s stress which impairs immune function? I am pretty desperate to know why I would have gotten a bacterial infection. Thanks!
I am a fairly healthy 22 year old female and I recently got bacterial vaginosis, however I am not sexually active. The fact that there’s no known cause to this vaginal ph imbalance has made my head spin. I was looking deeper into my sleeping habits and I have pretty out of whack sleeping patterns. I sleep at unreasonable hours and usually skimp on hours. Does this cause hormonal imbalances which in result has disrupted my vaginal ph?Or perhaps it’s stress which impairs immune function? I am pretty desperate to know why I would have gotten a bacterial infection. Thanks!
Not getting enough sleep impacts our long-term brain health, memory, and hormone balance. Getting the ideal 8 hours of sleep per night allows the body to recover properly, detox, and keep hormones like cortisol, melatonin, and leptin balanced.  To maximize hormone function, I recommend getting to sleep from 10pm-6am. Here are more tips to help you optimize your sleep.
A loss of libido is the most commonly reported emotional symptom of hormonal imbalance in men. Trouble thinking clearly, often called "brain fog" is a very common symptom of hormone imbalance. Irritability and mood swings are also frequently cited. Chronic exhaustion, depression, anxiety and mood swings are common symptoms of hormonal imbalance in men and women.
I am almost desperate for answers. I’ve been on Junel Fe birth control now for 4 years after I had a cyst rupture and they found a small amount of endometriosis. I use to take Buspar for anxiety and it helped me SO much. Well I would feel better, stop taking it on and off and then 6 months ago, my anxiety was SO bad that it put me into a depressive state, which I’ve never felt. Ever since July, my anxiety comes about 2 weeks before me period and it’s super unbearable. No appetite, sleeping too much, no desire to leave my house, just awful. I told my gyno that I wanted off birth control and she said she doesn’t think my birth control has anything to do with it. Before birth control, I always had regular cycles every 28 days but would be super heavy the first 2 days. Since all this anxiety started, I was having crazy thoughts that there’s something wrong with me. I thought I had ovarian cancer and had an ultra sound but turned out to be an ovulating cyst. That’s why I think it’s weird because birth control is suppose to stop ovulation, but why am I? I don’t know what to do. I’m thinking about seeing an endocrinologist but i don’t know if that would help me get some answers.
Everyone is tired sometimes. But you should recover with adequate rest, hydration and a healthy diet.  If you feel you are taking care of yourself but are still exhausted or just can’t seem to get back to your best, consider having a comprehensive evaluation of your hormone levels.  Adrenal fatigue and hypothyroidism are more prevalent in our high-paced society than you may think.
Xenoestrogens tend to accumulate in body fat such as breast tissue, and play a dangerous role in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. They mimic the actions of estrogens by barging in and knocking naturally occurring estrogens right off the receptor sites of the cell. They are directly toxic to our DNA and are widely acknowledged to be contributing to the rising rate of breast cancer in western countries. After the 1976 banning of organochlorine pesticide use in Israel, breast cancer rates have come down.
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