A professional writer since 2008, Tracey Planinz writes articles on natural health, nutrition and fitness. She holds a doctorate and two professional certifications in her field, and continues to develop her education with additional classes and seminars. She has provided natural health consultations and private fitness instruction for clients in her local community.
To balance your hormones naturally, it’s important that you eliminate toxins in your body by avoiding conventional body care products that are made with potentially-harmful chemicals including DEA, parabens, propylene glycol and sodium lauryl sulfate. A better alternative is to use natural products made with ingredients like essential oils, coconut oil, shea butter and castor oil.
Probiotics: Probiotics can help in repairing your gut lining, which in turn, helps balance your hormones. They not only aid in digestion but can speed weight loss, improve mood, eliminate constipation, and boost the immune system. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that can actually improve your production and regulation of key hormones like insulin, ghrelin and leptin.
Because all the systems in the body are interconnected, if you have one hormone problem, you might have other ones as well. In other words, to say you have only one of these seven issues might be oversimplification – it could be all of these issues or a combination of some of these. It’s important to work with your health care provider to find out what hormone issues might actually be at play.

Instead of immediately resorting to a hormone replacement (which might be your conventional doctor’s first line of treatment), you need to figure out the “why” – what is causing the symptoms.  If you find that you do need hormones, then you need to find the way to replace them that most aligns with your body – low dose, topical, bio-identical, short duration.


Hello, my name is jessica. Im 17 years old. I am currently on the nexplanon implant for birth control and ive noticed since ive been on it (almost 3 years) ive had so much anxiety and depression. I was wondering if that was due to the birth control and if i get it taken out would my emotions go back to normal because i never had these issues before. Ive been on so many different websites looking for answers and cant get any. Is there a certain amount of time it takes after the birth control is taken out for my emotions to go back to normal?

Hi, I am 62 year old african american femal and have hypothyroidism i take Levothyroxine 1 tablet daily which my doctor said i will be taking for the rest of my life. I have had a partial hystorectomy which means i still have my overies. I have severe hot flashes, trouble getting a good nights sleep because of the hot flashes and have noticed i am getting several dark patchy spots on my body could these spots be the result of hormonal imbalance?
My daughter had been on the birth control pills since she was 16 (8 years now) because of cysts in her ovaries. She has had lots of UTIs, about 2 a year since then. 2017 she had 4. The urologist looked closer into it and discovered that they all haven’t been UTIs after all. Most of the cultures came back from the lab as negative. He now saying she has interstitial cystitis. We have notice that most of her bladder flare ups are right before her period. She is in such pain during that time. And I started researching and it seems to me she might have a hormonal imbalance due to the birth control pills. I’m wondering if she gets off the pill if all her problems would go away or would getting off the pill make it worse? I’m thinking the pills has cause her problem? Tell me what you think?
Our clients are never expected to take our advice on faith alone. We are happy to explain the science behind our female hormone imbalance treatment in Philadelphia PA, complete with references to relevant research. We’ve been studying the science of healthy female aging since 1999, and in that time we’ve developed the following protocols to maximize the effects of our treatments while also preserving our clients’ health:
The focus here will be on the ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. Even though they are typically called sex hormones, the brain understand them, and often interprets them in consequential ways that have nothing to do with sexuality. For example, the brain has many receptors that interpret and understand the chemical language of estrogen, that is why there are a lot of cognitive changes (memory) and emotional ones (mood) that occurs at menopause after estrogen plummets.  In fact, the body of a seventy-something man makes more than twice as much estrogen as that of a woman the same age. This is because small amounts of testosterone, which the testes produce throughout life, are converted to estrogen. 

I have so many of the issues listed. I really want to stop taking my birth control pills. They are combination pills, with a decently high amount of estrogen. The problem is, the last time I tried to quit taking them was three years ago. And that time was hell. 2 months after I stopped I had massive migraines almost daily. They only went away when I started pills back up. I never had migraines at all before that. Now I still get them here and there. I may quit again anyway since I still get migraines.
If you can't sleep or you don't get good quality sleep, hormone balance may be to blame. Progesterone is one compound released by the ovaries that helps you sleep. Low levels may make it difficult to fall and stay asleep. A small study in postmenopausal women found that 300 milligrams of progesterone restored normal sleep when sleep was disturbed. Estrogen levels decrease in perimenopause and after menopause. This may contribute to night sweats and hot flashes, which often disrupt a woman's ability to sleep. See your doctor if you believe an imbalance in hormones is contributing to sleep problems.
Ideally, we could get all of our nutrients from food, properly hydrate from water, and get enough Vitamin D from the sun on a daily basis. We’d get magnesium from the ocean and not get deficient in the first place since we’d be consuming adequate minerals from eating fresh seafood. Since this is rarely the case, supplements can sometimes be needed! I’ve shared the basic supplements that I take before, but certain supplements are especially helpful for hormone balance.
Supplement smartly. Fish oil and additional vitamin D and B vitamins help balance estrogen. Take these in addition to a good multivitamin and mineral with sufficient calcium and magnesium. Probiotics, antioxidants and phytonutrients (vitamin E, resveratrol, curcumin, n-actetyl cysteine, green tea, selenium), and the anti-inflammatory omega-6 fat (GLA or gamma linoleic acid) can help balance sex hormones. You can find these and other hormone-balancing supplements in my store.
The trouble is that polyunsaturated fats are less stable and oxidize easily in the body, which can lead to inflammation and mutations within the body. Emerging evidence suggests that that this inflammation can occur in arterial cells (potentially increasing the chance of clogged arteries), skin cells (leading to skin mutations) and reproductive cells (which may be connected to PCOS and other hormone problems).
Hormones — such as estrogen, testosterone, adrenaline and insulin — are extremely important chemical messengers that affect many aspects of your overall health. Hormones are secreted by various glands and organs, including your thyroid, adrenals, pituitary, ovaries, testicles and pancreas. The entire endocrine system works together to control the level of hormones circulating throughout your body, and if one or more is even slightly imbalanced, it can cause widespread, major health problems.
Hormones are produced in a complex process, but depend on beneficial fats and cholesterol, so lack of these important dietary factors can cause hormone problems simply because the body doesn’t have the building blocks to make them. Toxins containing chemicals that mimic these building blocks or that mimic the hormones themselves are also problematic because the body can attempt to create hormones using the wrong building blocks. Mutant estrogen anyone?
Getting regular exercise will also help, according to Amaru, as will learning to handle stress in a more healthful way. "It's pretty much impossible to cut stress out of a woman's life," says Amaru. "But if you can change the way you handle it - go for a walk, meditate, listen to music, whatever it is that helps you to de-stress - you will see a favorable impact on your perimenopause symptoms."
Hi I have been taking oral prog and T cream now for 9 months and I still have anxiety, sleep issues , sweating at night. I had a partial hyste and last March was thoroughly tested and told my Prog was low and T which was causing all my symptoms. I had been basically non functional before that with depression and anxiety. The thing is I am not like I was but still struggling and don’t feel myself. They have adjusted my hormones down and now back up several times and it’s not helping. I still have the symptoms just not the horrible dep. I also have some issues with my hands going numb at tines and tingling and weird body sensations like burning skin feeling almost and chest pressure. Could this be bc I do have adrenal fatigue or maybe I just on to much of the hormones?.if it is adrenal like to hi cortisol how can that be fixed ? Would that have caused my awful depression and anxiety in first place and that maybe all.i needed was to address that ? Or maybe do I need both hormones and that to be fixed. HELP I am so confused i don’t know what to think
There are more neurotransmitters in the gut than there are in the brain.  So it should be no surprise that individuals commonly experience gut symptoms related to conditions such as anxiety and depression.  Hormones influence gut function in other ways as well such as affecting the microbiome of the gut, the bacterial system in our intestines.  Hormone imbalances can lead to imbalances in our bacterial colonies influencing their numbers and function.  Gastrointestinal imbalances can be caused by hormone imbalances and vice versa.
The functional medicine model may be a superior treatment pathway in that its primary aim is to search out the causative factors behind the hormone imbalances and then treat these causes directly. In this way, treatment has a strong, positive effect on regulating hormone levels. With that said, in some cases hormone replacement therapy, usually in the form of bioidentical hormones, is an important component in the overall treatment protocol, but this is not the only treatment offered.
If you’re experiencing symptoms of menopause, you may be tempted to try a home testing kit. Home testing kits measure follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in your urine. FSH levels increase when you enter menopause, but levels also rise and fall during a normal menstrual cycle. This test can give you an indication of whether menopause has started, but it can’t tell you conclusively.
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