Are you aware of your medication’s side effects? Some can disrupt your hormone balance, leading to side effects like fatigue, appetite changes, altered sleeping patterns, low libido, sadness and even depression. Some medications that can mess with your hormone balance include corticosteroids, stimulants, statins, dopamine agonists, rexinoids and glucocorticoids. Beware of your medications, talk to your doctor about the side effects and research natural alternatives whenever possible.

Despite potential drawbacks, there are some cases in which hormone replacement and medications are helpful and even necessary for women whose symptoms are unmanageable. Occasionally, despite lifestyle therapies – diet, exercise, stress reduction, nutrient supplementation, and herbs – hormone therapy can be lifesaving (as well as mood- and brain-saving).
Once we’ve identified potential causes of the problem, we work with patients to create a roadmap of lifestyle and behavioral changes that will help heal their bodies, and reduce the stress on their endocrine system. Sometimes hormone replacement therapy is used in conjunction with these lifestyle and behavioral changes, but for many patients changes in diet and lifestyle can help reset the body and reduce the symptoms of hormone imbalance. If you have been diagnosed with a hormone imbalance, Aligned Modern Health has the tools to help you take control over your health and wellness so your body can restore the natural balance of hormones.
Hormonal imbalances can occur in men and women of almost any age.1 A variety of factors can be related to these imbalances, including high insulin levels from diets high in refined foods and sugar, exposure to environmental toxins (xenoestrogens), high consumption of hydrogenated fats, and lack of physical activity leading to weight gain.2-5 Age is also a factor in reduced levels of hormones, creating feelings of imbalance in everyday pursuits. For example, testosterone levels in women begin going down after age 20. By age 40 a woman's testosterone level will be half of what it was when she was 20 years old. This is why getting hormone levels checked even while in your 20's may be necessary if you aren't feeling yourself. For women between the ages of 40–60, testosterone levels can remain pretty constant. After menopause testosterone declines once again.1
Our clients are never expected to take our advice on faith alone. We are happy to explain the science behind our female hormone imbalance treatment in Philadelphia PA, complete with references to relevant research. We’ve been studying the science of healthy female aging since 1999, and in that time we’ve developed the following protocols to maximize the effects of our treatments while also preserving our clients’ health:

The information on this website has not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration or any other medical body. We do not aim to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. Information is shared for educational purposes only. You must consult your doctor before acting on any content on this website, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition.
General symptoms of hormone imbalance are familiar to women as premenstrual syndrome or PMS, or menopause symptoms of hot flashes and/or night sweats, foggy thinking, low libido, depression, fatigue, and/or weight gain in the hips or waist. As uncomfortable as these hormone fluctuation symptoms may be, symptoms of estrogen dominance are less familiar but vital to breast cancer prevention.
When too stressed out, the adrenal gland borrows raw material to make Cortisol, the notorious stress hormone. It borrows it from Progesterone.  This leads to lower levels of progesterone. This is one way stress interferes with getting pregnant and leads to infertility in women.  Furthermore, lower levels of progesterone are associated with more severe PMS symptoms, and mood instability. Not only that but, it causes estrogen/progesterone imbalance. Which can cause many gynecological problems.  Such factors may lead to long cycles. I know some of you were told that it is ok to have long cycles, but research says it might lead to breast cancer. Progesterone has just revealed its nasty side, because you insulted your adrenal gland.
Testosterone is typically thought of as a male hormone, but both men and women have it. Low testosterone levels may cause low libido. In one study of more than 800 postmenopausal women reporting low sex drive, those who received 150 or 300 micrograms per day of testosterone in the form of a topical patch reported more sexual desire and less distress than women who received a placebo. Women receiving extra testosterone also reported more satisfying sexual experiences compared to women who took a placebo. However, women who took 300 micrograms of testosterone per day had more unwanted hair growth than women who took the placebo. Men can get low testosterone, too. The condition has been referred to as andropause in males.
Maintaining balanced hormones is complex, as many different factors can contribute to fluctuating hormone levels, especially in women. Throughout the various different stages of life, from puberty to pregnancy to menopause, hormones are naturally in flux. For many of the years in between, however, hormones may flux and become imbalanced as a result of lifestyle and environmental factors, such as high levels of stress, poor sleep, lack of exercise, and an unhealthy diet full of fat and sugar. While all factors are important to consider, monitoring sugar intake is especially key as it relates to women’s hormones.
I’ve written about Leptin and thyroid hormones before, and these are just a small piece in the complicated hormone system in the body. In a given day or month, a woman’s body will have fluctuations in hormones like estrogen, progesterone, cortisol, lutenizing hormone, prolactin, oxytocin, leptin, ghrelin, thyroid hormones, melatonin, serotonin and others.

Most women have menstrual cycles that last between 21 and 35 days. Up to one quarter of women experience irregular periods. This includes having periods that are shorter or longer than usual or periods that are lighter or heavier than usual. Some women who have irregular periods may experience abdominal cramping or a lack of ovulation. Amenorrhea is a medical term that refers to the an absence of periods for at least 3 months even though a woman is not pregnant. Menorrhagia is a disorder that causes excessive menstrual bleeding. Dysmenorrhea causes pain and cramping during periods. Prolonged menstrual bleeding involves periods in which bleeding routinely lasts for 8 days or longer. Oligomenorrhea is a condition in which periods occur infrequently or more than every 35 days. See your doctor if you believe hormonal imbalance is affecting your menstrual cycle.
Both men and women are subject to irregularities related to their sex hormones.  And both men and women have relatively appropriate levels of estrogen, progesterone, DHEA and testosterone.  Women that are experiencing irregular menses (too long, too short, unpredictable, heavy bleeding or cramping, etc.) are more clearly demonstrating some type of abnormality in the quality, quantity or function of their sex hormones.  Although women have a more obvious gauge of hormone balance with their monthly menses, both sexes can experience sexual dysfunction or issues with libido (sexual desire) due to the complex intricacies and interactions of these powerful substances.
Hi,am 21 i have abnormal period some time i get it in 2 weeks some times in 3,i have tired to use birth control pill but after i used it for 3 month i stoped,while i was on the pill everything is right no pain no abnormality nor acne.but right after i stoped using it i got this big painfull bumps that literally mess up my face.it’s been 2 month since i stoped using birth control pill and now am trying to work out and stable my hormones naturally but to be honest it hasn’t been goin well for me.my breats hurts so much i have black marks on my face am usually dipressed and dont want to leave home,since i knew about my unbalanced hormones i didn’t almost everything i can but its not effective as it’s written in every book or online pages I’ve read,can u tell me what i should do to balance my hormones? Please help me
TCM practitioners believe that the emotions of fear cause disease in your reproductive organs, kidneys and adrenals, affecting cortisol levels. This can lead to serious conditions like PCOS and infertility. The emotions of frustration, impatience and un-forgiveness cause disease in your liver, which can lead to an estrogen imbalance. And emotions of worry and anxiety can cause issues with your insulin levels, which can then affect several hormones. (11)
Was diagnosed of hyperthyroidism 2013 was on thyroid medication, 2014 i had a radioactive iodine months after I became hypothyroid and have being on levothyrosine as I was told I would take it for life,I didn’t have it for a week in April as I wanted to try fruits so I had a breakdown,with emotional issues in my relationship, lots of thinking and crying, stressed out and depressed, hotness in my head ad legs,then I ran a thyroid test t3 low,t4 low,the extremely high I’m back on my medication but still feel horrible, lack of interest, hotness… Symptoms of hormone imbalance. What can I do please, I’m losing it
Fennel: Problems with your gut health have been found to cause autoimmune reactions, including thyroid disorders. Use fennel essential oil to relax your body, improve your digestion and gut health, boost your metabolism and reduce inflammation. You can rub 2 drops of fennel into your stomach or add 1-2 drops to a class of warm water or tea to take it internally.
Sleep helps keep stress hormones balanced, builds energy and allows the body to recover properly. Excessive stress and poor sleep are linked with higher levels of morning cortisol, decreased immunity, trouble with work performance, and a higher susceptibility to anxiety, weight gain and depression. To maximize hormone function, ideally try to get to bed by 10 p.m. and stick with a regular sleep-wake-cycle as much as possible.

Most women have menstrual cycles that last between 21 and 35 days. Up to one quarter of women experience irregular periods. This includes having periods that are shorter or longer than usual or periods that are lighter or heavier than usual. Some women who have irregular periods may experience abdominal cramping or a lack of ovulation. Amenorrhea is a medical term that refers to the an absence of periods for at least 3 months even though a woman is not pregnant. Menorrhagia is a disorder that causes excessive menstrual bleeding. Dysmenorrhea causes pain and cramping during periods. Prolonged menstrual bleeding involves periods in which bleeding routinely lasts for 8 days or longer. Oligomenorrhea is a condition in which periods occur infrequently or more than every 35 days. See your doctor if you believe hormonal imbalance is affecting your menstrual cycle.
People going through menopause transition or menopause may experience symptoms of hormonal imbalance, Lo explains. Estrogen changes during menopause can impact our brain chemicals; for example, decreasing levels of estrogen can trigger hot flashes and night sweats, she says. This can also result in some people experiencing memory problems or feelings of “fogginess” as well as moodiness, feelings of depression, poor sleep quality, decreased sex drive and vaginal dryness, Lo adds.
Of course, there is little mid-life women can do to reverse normal physiology and aging ovaries, although they can diligently guard against undue stress that can speed up the process. But growing numbers of younger women are showing signs of estrogen dominance as a result of anovulatory cycles (failure to ovulate) linked to an unbalanced lifestyle: chronic stress, crash diets, exposure to synthetic hormones used in birth control pills, and growth hormones in feedlot beef and dairy products, as well as xenoestrogens found in numerous personal hygiene and household products.
×