Many women are affected negatively by hormonal imbalance. To begin explaining why that is, let's settle on a location. Which organ is the culprit? You might have guessed, the ovaries. Really good educated guess, but not entirely correct. We start the story of the nasty effects of hormonal imbalance in women in the brain, yes in the head not down there. For the full story, you can listen to the TEDx talk: "The brain and ovarian hormones".

People going through menopause transition or menopause may experience symptoms of hormonal imbalance, Lo explains. Estrogen changes during menopause can impact our brain chemicals; for example, decreasing levels of estrogen can trigger hot flashes and night sweats, she says. This can also result in some people experiencing memory problems or feelings of “fogginess” as well as moodiness, feelings of depression, poor sleep quality, decreased sex drive and vaginal dryness, Lo adds.

Dr. Jolene Brighten is a Functional Medicine Naturopathic Medical Doctor and the founder and CEO of Rubus Health—a root cause women’s medicine clinic specializing in the treatment of hormone disorders, including adrenal, thyroid, and hormonal birth control related conditions. She is a recognized as an expert in Post-Birth Control Syndrome and the long term side effects associated with hormonal contraceptives. Dr. Brighten is a best-selling author, speaker, and clinical educator.

Once a day now compared to four times. A day) it lasts quite a while and is exhausting and painful) I’m a disabled vet , my insurance is limited to the VA and they are not helping me. It has taken them two years now to finally be willing to address the weight issues which resulted from the hormonal imbalances as a result perhaps of menopause however as a result of the extreme weight gains the bottom of my lungs collapsed, I have now become diabetic and I have horribly high cholesterol as well as they have found something wrong with my right ventricle in my heart. What I’m saying is .. my body just can’t take this weight. I need help and I needed it yesterday the struggle is real the depression getting out of control and the reason for my disability within the military is because of spinal cord Injuries and 21 ruptured /slipped discs. You read that right I have two left. So yes, my body hurts under the pressure of this weight. I would so appreciate any help you could offer. I have recently gained another ten lbs making it a whopping 70 lb gain and btw I’m on a sugar
In the meantime, there’s no need to wait on getting started with a diet overhaul. Since high sugar intake along with a highly refined carb/processed food diet are the most common contributors to insulin resistance and hormonal imbalance, making changes to eat “clean” can greatly improve health overall. This includes eating a variety of organic vegetables and fruits, whole grains, low fat dairy products, and lean sources of protein such as fish, suggests Healthline. It is also important to limit caffeine and alcohol consumption, as these can cause cortisol hormones to spike (which can disrupt all other hormone levels).
SOURCES: Christiane Northrup, MD, author of The Wisdom of Menopause Journal (Hay House, 2007) and Women's Bodies Women's Wisdom (Bantam Books, 2006). Nanette Santoro, MD, director, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology at Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Steven R. Goldstein, MD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at NYU Medical Center in New York City and coauthor of Could It Be Perimenopause? (Little, Brown and Company, 1998). Rebecca Amaru, MD, clinical instructor of obstetrics and gynecology at the Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York City.
In the meantime, there’s no need to wait on getting started with a diet overhaul. Since high sugar intake along with a highly refined carb/processed food diet are the most common contributors to insulin resistance and hormonal imbalance, making changes to eat “clean” can greatly improve health overall. This includes eating a variety of organic vegetables and fruits, whole grains, low fat dairy products, and lean sources of protein such as fish, suggests Healthline. It is also important to limit caffeine and alcohol consumption, as these can cause cortisol hormones to spike (which can disrupt all other hormone levels).
Hi, I’m a 33 year old who has been suffering from hormonal imbalance since my teenage years. I was then diagnosed with endometriosis in April 2016 after having done a laporoscopy. My gynae prescribed that I take Vissanne for 6 months which I did. After a few months of taking it I went on menopause and he explained to me that was the intention. At first I was uncomfortable with the idea until he explained that I don’t really need to go on my period. This way, I save my good eggs for when I’m ready to have a child. I haven’t had any children yet.
Insulin is the hormone responsible for maintaining normal blood sugar (glucose) levels in the body. The foods we eat break down into glucose, and insulin’s job is to transport that glucose into the cells that turn it into fuel for energy. Insulin resistance arises when the body is flooded with more sugar than it can handle, and attempts to deliver that glucose to the cells are met with resistance. The syndrome goes hand-in-hand with rising rates of obesity and diabetes. What, you might ask, has this to do with breast cancer? The answer boils down to simple physiology. Excess carbohydrates (especially in refined foods and sugars) that are not needed for energy are stored as fat. Increased body fat increases estrogen levels and increased estrogen levels lead to estrogen dominance, which, as we already know, leads to increased risks for breast cancer.
hi guys im 28yrs old and i have 2 girls 13 nd 10 about 8yrs ago my husband nd i decided to try for another bby we tried nd tried n tried nd tried nothng happened so i went to the doctor and explaw to him that after my 2child was born i went on the depo shot but only took it 2 times nd we are ttc but nothing is happening i went for tests n scans nd there was nothing wrong nd he said not to stress everything is fine then a 2 yrs pass by then i start to get irregular periods and heavy bleeding it was painful nd i was tiered all the time then went back to same doc nd did more tests n scans he said everything is fine nd i must stop stressing everything is in my head few yrs after that i had a d&c they found sumthing that was sticking to my womb wall scrapped it of nd sent for testing nd they said its not harmful or be the reason why i cnt fall pregnant then my i got my period for 3 months non stop bleeding heavy nasty big clots coming out then wnt to a gynaecologist he took scans n dis tests nd said my womb is attached to the fat inside my stomach did an operation he said try again we did nothing happened went back to my doc did tests coz im starting to grow a beard nd gaining weight we did tests he talk about hormones i got more male hormones than female then i asked what can i do to fix it he put me on metforman(im pre diabetic) nd gave me claira birth control pills the pills worked but he keeps taking me off it im 115kg now nd i was 87 when i started can u please help or give me advice
General symptoms of hormone imbalance are familiar to women as premenstrual syndrome or PMS, or menopause symptoms of hot flashes and/or night sweats, foggy thinking, low libido, depression, fatigue, and/or weight gain in the hips or waist. As uncomfortable as these hormone fluctuation symptoms may be, symptoms of estrogen dominance are less familiar but vital to breast cancer prevention.
To diagnose hormone conditions, our team will take blood and saliva tests, discuss your health and family history, and look at your overall lifestyle. If this testing shows that you have low hormones or another imbalance, you will be provided with a treatment plan. Often, hormone imbalances respond well to dietary changes and lifestyle changes. Removing inflammatory foods from the diet, for instance, can help heal the thyroid and restore a normal hormone balance. Sometimes additional hormone replacement is necessary to bring balance.
The food you choose to eat can have a major impact on your health. If your diet is high in sugar, processed carbohydrates, hydrogenated fats, genetically modified foods, and conventional beef, dairy, and poultry, then you are more susceptible to obesity and all the associated diseases, plus an increase in hormonal imbalances.6-11 It's important to maintain a healthy weight, as storing excess fat can lead to hormone imbalances and an increase in stored environmental toxins. Toxins have a negative impact on overall health and should be avoided at all ages of life, especially during pregnancy where the developing baby can carry the negative impact the rest of its life.12-15
If you're concerned about low libido, try incorporating more zinc-rich foods—like oysters and sesame seeds—into your diet (zinc appears to be linked to an increase in testosterone levels), and ask your doctor about testosterone supplementation. To treat PCOS, your doctor might recommend taking birth control pills containing synthetic hormones that reduce the production of testosterone. It's also important to avoid refined sugars and other carbohydrates in your diet (insulin resistance is linked to a boost in testosterone production) and to eat more fiber (which counteracts blood sugar spikes and promotes the excretion of excess sugars from the body).
The use of birth control pills in teenage girls has the potential to raise their risk of breast cancer. It is well established that when girls between the ages of 13 and 18—and to a lesser but still significant degree, up to the age of 21—use birth control pills, their risk of breast cancer can increase by as much as 600 percent. To put it plainly, the earlier a girl begins to use contraceptives, the greater her risk of breast cancer. This may be because the younger the girl, the more undeveloped her breast tissue, and thus the more vulnerable it is to the synthetic hormones contained in the pill. Furthermore, contraceptives work by inhibiting ovulation, which significantly reduces progesterone production and its essential estrogen balancing effects. This is a situation many young women find themselves in: ripe for symptoms of estrogen dominance and vulnerable to long-term risks for breast cancer. (Excerpted from What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Breast Cancer: How Hormone Balance Can Help Save Your Life.)

Magnesium– Magnesium is vital for hundreds of functions within the human body and many of us are deficient in this master mineral (here’s how to tell if you are). There are several different ways to get Magnesium: In powder form with a product like Natural Calm so that you can vary your dose and work up slowly, ionic liquid form can be added to food and drinks and dose can be worked up slowly,or transdermal form by using Magnesium oil applied to the skin (this is my favorite method). Topical application is often the most effective option for those with a damaged digestive tract or severe deficiency.
There are more neurotransmitters in the gut than there are in the brain.  So it should be no surprise that individuals commonly experience gut symptoms related to conditions such as anxiety and depression.  Hormones influence gut function in other ways as well such as affecting the microbiome of the gut, the bacterial system in our intestines.  Hormone imbalances can lead to imbalances in our bacterial colonies influencing their numbers and function.  Gastrointestinal imbalances can be caused by hormone imbalances and vice versa.
The trouble is that polyunsaturated fats are less stable and oxidize easily in the body, which can lead to inflammation and mutations within the body. Emerging evidence suggests that that this inflammation can occur in arterial cells (potentially increasing the chance of clogged arteries), skin cells (leading to skin mutations) and reproductive cells (which may be connected to PCOS and other hormone problems).

Though it used to be in vogue to prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to treat this fundamental imbalance, persistent links to breast and ovarian cancer, heart disease, and blood clots have caused most healthcare professionals to rethink this drastic option. Many agree that the most effective approach is to combine a few changes in lifestyle with alternative treatment options.

Bloating, fatigue, irritability, hair loss, palpitations, mood swings, problems with blood sugar, trouble concentrating, infertility -- these are just a few symptoms of hormone imbalance. These compounds affect every cell and system in the body. Hormone imbalance can debilitate you. Some hormonal shifts are normal, like monthly fluctuations responsible for menstruation and ovulation or the changes that occur during pregnancy. Menopause is another time for a normal hormonal shift in a woman's life. Other times these fluctuations may be due to a medication or a medical condition.
It’s not “all in your head”.  Neuroendocrinology is the study of the intimate relationship of the neurotransmitters, or chemical messengers of the brain, and hormones.  Excess adrenal stimulation due to the outrageous stress that we subject ourselves to has become a silent epidemic.  Cortisol and norepinephrine, produced and released by the adrenal glands, often underlie the feelings that you may perceive as anxiety.

Hello! Just thought I’d see what you think about my situation. 3 years ago when I turned 45, I started having menopause symptoms. Found out I had hypothyroid and all my hormones but estrogen were low. I started taking thyroid meds and prometrium 100mg (natural progesterone). I gained 6 pounds the first two weeks! I have been the same weight my whole life before this (115lbs). Since then, I have gained another 15 pounds! No change in diet. I just got my hormones tested last month and now ALL my hormones are at the bottom. I quit taking my progesterone a month and a half ago to see if the weight would start to go away. So far nothing. Two weeks ago, I started taking a new thyroid med, estridiol gel and cut way back on my progesterone to 20-30mg a day. I stopped gaining weight, but how am I going to lose this extra 20 pounds?? I thought progesterone was supposed to help you lose weight? I am super depressed about it. Even if I eat 1000 calories a day and exercise, I can’t lose a pound. It’s going on 3 years of trying to lose this!
Fatigue is a common symptom that may have many potential underlying causes. Just as too little progesterone can make it hard to sleep, too much progesterone can make you more tired. Another common hormonal imbalance that causes fatigue is low thyroid hormone levels (hypothyroidism). This condition is easily diagnosed with a blood test. If your levels are low, you can take prescription medication to bring your levels back up to normal. Regardless of any hormone imbalance that may exist, practice good sleep hygiene to optimize your sleep. This involves going to bed and waking up at the same time every day, even on the weekends. Avoid alcohol, caffeine, and exercise from the late afternoon on to avoid interfering with sleep. Establish a relaxing nighttime routine to give your body the message that it's time for sleep. Take a warm bath, sip a cup of chamomile tea, or listen to relaxing music.
Some of the symptoms associated with a hormonal imbalance because of PCOS include growing hair on the facial area (chin and upper lips), abnormal uterine bleeding or no periods for months or weeks, Tran tells SheKnows. It can also result in obesity, a higher chance of developing diabetes, high blood pressure, infertility and uterine cancer later in life. Treatments for this type of hormonal imbalance include birth control pills, ovarian drilling procedures, laser hair removal (for the unwanted hair) and the drugs spironolactone or metformin, she adds.
Some of the symptoms associated with a hormonal imbalance because of PCOS include growing hair on the facial area (chin and upper lips), abnormal uterine bleeding or no periods for months or weeks, Tran tells SheKnows. It can also result in obesity, a higher chance of developing diabetes, high blood pressure, infertility and uterine cancer later in life. Treatments for this type of hormonal imbalance include birth control pills, ovarian drilling procedures, laser hair removal (for the unwanted hair) and the drugs spironolactone or metformin, she adds.
I’ve written about Leptin and thyroid hormones before, and these are just a small piece in the complicated hormone system in the body. In a given day or month, a woman’s body will have fluctuations in hormones like estrogen, progesterone, cortisol, lutenizing hormone, prolactin, oxytocin, leptin, ghrelin, thyroid hormones, melatonin, serotonin and others.
Functional medicine teaches us to temper this response through eating foods that modulate this response and avoiding foods that promote it.  At Parsley Health we also teach techniques such as meditation, deep breathing and modulating heart-rate variability to engage the parasympathetic relaxation side of your nervous system rather than the sympathetic “fight-or-flight” impulses.
In the meantime, there’s no need to wait on getting started with a diet overhaul. Since high sugar intake along with a highly refined carb/processed food diet are the most common contributors to insulin resistance and hormonal imbalance, making changes to eat “clean” can greatly improve health overall. This includes eating a variety of organic vegetables and fruits, whole grains, low fat dairy products, and lean sources of protein such as fish, suggests Healthline. It is also important to limit caffeine and alcohol consumption, as these can cause cortisol hormones to spike (which can disrupt all other hormone levels).
Hi my name is Sindy, i am 30 yrs old. I have been suffering woth estrogen dominance for over a year now. I took the depo provera shot last year Jan 2017 and only one shot and it changed my life. I am always tired, my body aches and have this dizziness around the time of my periods every month. This is annoying and disturbing my daily life now please help what can i do. I have done test and my Progesterone levels are very low.

Most women have menstrual cycles that last between 21 and 35 days. Up to one quarter of women experience irregular periods. This includes having periods that are shorter or longer than usual or periods that are lighter or heavier than usual. Some women who have irregular periods may experience abdominal cramping or a lack of ovulation. Amenorrhea is a medical term that refers to the an absence of periods for at least 3 months even though a woman is not pregnant. Menorrhagia is a disorder that causes excessive menstrual bleeding. Dysmenorrhea causes pain and cramping during periods. Prolonged menstrual bleeding involves periods in which bleeding routinely lasts for 8 days or longer. Oligomenorrhea is a condition in which periods occur infrequently or more than every 35 days. See your doctor if you believe hormonal imbalance is affecting your menstrual cycle.
There are many reasons why someone may be having difficulty sleeping.  But if it’s persistent, it’s likely related to your hormones.  Melatonin, the well-known sleep chemical, is a hormone released by the pineal gland in the brain.  As a hormone, it is intimately related and affected by the other hormones.  You can think of the different hormones as pieces in a complicated game of chess.  If you move one, it affects all the others and they have to move accordingly.  With certain moves, things can get dangerous.  If you are not sleeping well, it would be wise to have a professional assist you in holistically determining why.  Conversely, if you are imbalanced for other reasons, appropriate rest is necessary to help bring things back into balance.
×