Thyroid hormone regulates how fast you burn calories. One in ten women doesn't produce enough of it—a condition known as hypothyroidism, which can lead to weight gain, depression, and fatigue. On the other end of the spectrum is hyperthyroidism, in which the thyroid gland releases too much of its hormone, causing symptoms such as anxiety, a racing heart, excessive sweating, even diarrhea.
General symptoms of hormone imbalance are familiar to women as premenstrual syndrome or PMS, or menopause symptoms of hot flashes and/or night sweats, foggy thinking, low libido, depression, fatigue, and/or weight gain in the hips or waist. As uncomfortable as these hormone fluctuation symptoms may be, symptoms of estrogen dominance are less familiar but vital to breast cancer prevention.
The trouble is that polyunsaturated fats are less stable and oxidize easily in the body, which can lead to inflammation and mutations within the body. Emerging evidence suggests that that this inflammation can occur in arterial cells (potentially increasing the chance of clogged arteries), skin cells (leading to skin mutations) and reproductive cells (which may be connected to PCOS and other hormone problems).
"Heavy periods are often a problem, because oestrogen is a hormone that makes the lining of the womb grow excessively. When you’re not trying to get pregnant this just causes heavy, sometimes debilitating periods, but when you are it can also wash out a conceptus (the embryo in the uterus in the very early stages of pregnancy) before it has a chance to implant properly. In this way it’s not that the woman is infertile, it’s just that her hormone imbalance is getting in the way of her body maintaining a successful pregnancy."
Vitamin D is another important nutrient that is actually a hormone within your body. It not only reduces inflammation and balances your hormones but also boosts your overall immunity (11), (12). To activate supplemental vitamin D or sunshine vitamin D, you require magnesium, and to avoid creating magnesium deficiency, take only 1,000-2,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day. Taking both together will increase your vitamin D levels much more than taking vitamin D alone.
Are you aware of your medication’s side effects? Some can disrupt your hormone balance, leading to side effects like fatigue, appetite changes, altered sleeping patterns, low libido, sadness and even depression. Some medications that can mess with your hormone balance include corticosteroids, stimulants, statins, dopamine agonists, rexinoids and glucocorticoids. Beware of your medications, talk to your doctor about the side effects and research natural alternatives whenever possible.

If you suspect that you might suffer from hormonal imbalance, the first step is to consult with a medical doctor. It is possible that your lab results are within the normal range but you still have many of the above symptoms, some of the tests are not sensitive enough to pick up on all indications of imbalance.  This just means that your journey to find alternative treatments will be a long one, but very much worth it.

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Hi… For a while now I’ve been reading about the effects of hormonal imbalance in the physical appearance or physique in general… What I’m really concerned about is my broad shoulder which come off too manly and instead of the feminine shape like a normal girl would have…I ofen get insecure because I cannot wear the clothes I want because my shape seem to be too masculine for the attire (as it appears as an inverted triangle rather than an hour glass)… and just recently I checked with my doctor about my irregular menstruation to where she said that I’m having imbalances in my hormones… having too much estrogen than progesterone… Is it possible that my masculine appearance could be attributed to the said hormonal imbalance???…. and could it be addressed by intake of pills???
This primary level of treatment involves the least amount of risk, though conversely it requires the highest amount of self-discipline. Many times some simple changes in lifestyle can reap huge benefits in fighting symptoms caused by hormonal imbalance, and achieving a higher overall level of health. Fundamentally, techniques for stress reduction, such as yoga or meditation, combined with regular exercise and an improved diet, can do a woman great service. Diet in particular is key.
Please I seem a bit confused of the changes am experiencing its been two weeks now am having this symptoms, during my ovulation I had this full breast and erect nipple which lasted for three days after some days I saw my menses which was a bit abnormal immediately after my menses the full breast started again with erect nipple and unstable sharp pain which comes and goes after a week of this my menses started again this time it was dropping at the same time it will stop and start again. after which making it two weeks the menses started pouring and weakening my right hand, am having this fullness mostly at my right breast but the sharp pain affect both breast sometimes but more on the right side what could be the cause
Functional medicine wants to find out the root cause of patients’ hormonal symptoms as well as support the body’s natural mechanisms for healthy hormone balance, and that makes a lot more sense to me. Let’s go over some of the most common hormone problems that I see in patients, and that you may be going through right now. I’ll also explain which labs you may want to consider asking your doctor about.

Feeling bloated, irritable, or just not your best? A hormone imbalance could be to blame. Hormones are chemical “messengers” that impact the way your cells and organs function. It’s normal for your levels to shift at different times of your life, such as before and during your period or a pregnancy, or during menopause. But some medications and health issues can cause them to go up or down, too.
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