Fatigue, mood instability, weight gain, foggy brain/memory loss, adult acne, hair loss/facial hair, lower sex drive, extreme PMS slide. These symptoms do not just reduce quality of life but they also increase chances of stroke, heart disease, cancer and of course gynecological problems (endometriosis, fibroid, tumors and cysts). There are solutions, don't just acquiesce to lower quality of life. And even if you accept such low standards of functionality, this might amount to truncating your life.  
Hormones are essential to your overall wellbeing. They relay chemical messages throughout the body, helping to keep your emotions and body systems in check. One of the key body systems affected by the balance of the hormones in your body is the reproductive system. A female hormonal imbalance could cause heavy periods, infertility, and endometriosis. (Imbalances can affect other body systems, as well.)

Hormone imbalance is becoming increasingly common in modern Americans, but what many who have these disorders don’t realize is the fact that hormone imbalance is not “normal.” In a healthy, functioning person, hormones should be in balance to support the functions of the body. When hormones are out of balance, it’s because something in the body is also not functioning properly.
But when you suspect hormone imbalance, mainstream medicine typically runs only basic labs. If your labs don’t come back “normal,” you’re typically given a synthetic hormone cream or pill that could have side effects. If those labs come back “normal” and you’re still experiencing symptoms, you may be told you’re either depressed, just getting older, or need to lose weight.
Are you constantly feeling tired and depressed? Have you been unable to lose weight, or noticed sudden weight gain? Is your skin breaking out like a teenager, but you’re well into your 30s? If you’re noticing these types of problems, you may have a hormone imbalance. Whether you have been professionally diagnosed with an imbalance or are wondering if you have one, Aligned Modern Health is ready to assist you in making the necessary changes to get back on the road to wellness.
Hormones — such as estrogen, testosterone, adrenaline and insulin — are extremely important chemical messengers that affect many aspects of your overall health. Hormones are secreted by various glands and organs, including your thyroid, adrenals, pituitary, ovaries, testicles and pancreas. The entire endocrine system works together to control the level of hormones circulating throughout your body, and if one or more is even slightly imbalanced, it can cause widespread, major health problems.

Menopause doesn't have to mean the end of your sex life. If you experience dryness and discomfort during vaginal penetration, the North American Menopause Society suggests that you use a water-based vaginal lubricant or a vaginal moisturizer. Last but not least, regular sexual activity and stimulation can promote blood flow to the genitals ??? in this case, there is some truth to the phrase, "Use it or lose it."
For many women, night sweats and hot flashes are the first uncomfortable sign that something is amiss. This isn't the time to start hormone replacement therapy, but begin a food journal by jotting down what you eat and drink, how you feel physically, and any emotions that come up after. Many times our emotions are the trigger that increases internal temperature. The next time you feel the flashes coming on, stop and think about the thoughts swirling around in your mind.
Hormone balance is deeply connected to the food we eat, the exercise we get, the toxins we absorb, the weight we carry, and the stress levels we put up with. How these multiple factors impact the overall hormone picture is crucial, particularly at midlife when most hormone production is taken over by the adrenal glands. If stress takes center stage in our lives and becomes chronic, cortisol floods the system and total hormone production lags. This forces the body to steal from its own supplies of available progesterone, to make more cortisol, thus depleting this key balancing hormone with obvious implications for estrogen dominance. Prolonged stress tears up our bones, melts our muscles, robs us of strength and energy, lowers our libido and overwhelms our immunities, putting us at serious risk for chronic illness and autoimmune disease.
In addition, Ruiz says that each cycle in itself is unique, with slightly differing hormone levels. People under 40 years of age who ovulate generally have good-quality eggs, making hormone variation from cycle to cycle pretty steady, he explains. However, as the person approaches menopause, the egg quality is less consistent, resulting in more variation in hormone levels, Ruiz says.
Herbs That Raise Estrogen Level How to Get Rid of Excess Estrogen in Your Body Testosterone and Weight Loss in Women Natural Ways to Increase Estrogen Levels Supplements that Increase Women's Libido Herbal Remedies for Gynecomastia Supplements to Reduce Estrogen 5 Things You Need to Know About Women and DHT Hair Loss Supplements to Increase Estrogen Levels Herbs That Affect Birth Control Pills What Foods Have DHEA? Reasons for a Missed Period and Not Pregnant Progesterone & Heart Palpitations How to Lose Weight While on the Depo Shot Normal Blood Pressure Range for Women Amino Acids That You Can't Get from a Vegetarian Diet Chinese Herbs to Last Longer in Bed Herbal Treatments for Low Testosterone How to Tone Up After Menopause Maca & Pregnancy
Hello! I’m 43 years old.i have an 8yr history with hormonal imbalance.it started with me getting periods every 15days. When I went to the doctor she said I had a cyst in my ovary. Over the years it just kept getting from bad to worse with me getting periods within 15 days to now when I don’t get a period for 3-6months..! Two years ago my doctor decided to put a marena for me and soon after that I started to put on weight and had a total loss of libido. I got it removed after 4 months. So now I have weight that I gained since the marena which is around my belly and mentally I feel like I’m going crazy most of the time! Very extreme emotions of sadness,depression etc
Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.

If you're concerned about low libido, try incorporating more zinc-rich foods—like oysters and sesame seeds—into your diet (zinc appears to be linked to an increase in testosterone levels), and ask your doctor about testosterone supplementation. To treat PCOS, your doctor might recommend taking birth control pills containing synthetic hormones that reduce the production of testosterone. It's also important to avoid refined sugars and other carbohydrates in your diet (insulin resistance is linked to a boost in testosterone production) and to eat more fiber (which counteracts blood sugar spikes and promotes the excretion of excess sugars from the body).


SOURCES: Christiane Northrup, MD, author of The Wisdom of Menopause Journal (Hay House, 2007) and Women's Bodies Women's Wisdom (Bantam Books, 2006). Nanette Santoro, MD, director, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology at Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Steven R. Goldstein, MD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at NYU Medical Center in New York City and coauthor of Could It Be Perimenopause? (Little, Brown and Company, 1998). Rebecca Amaru, MD, clinical instructor of obstetrics and gynecology at the Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York City.
Was diagnosed of hyperthyroidism 2013 was on thyroid medication, 2014 i had a radioactive iodine months after I became hypothyroid and have being on levothyrosine as I was told I would take it for life,I didn’t have it for a week in April as I wanted to try fruits so I had a breakdown,with emotional issues in my relationship, lots of thinking and crying, stressed out and depressed, hotness in my head ad legs,then I ran a thyroid test t3 low,t4 low,the extremely high I’m back on my medication but still feel horrible, lack of interest, hotness… Symptoms of hormone imbalance. What can I do please, I’m losing it
Alternative approaches involve little to no risk and can be an extremely effective way to treat all types of hormonal imbalance. This level of approach can involve several different therapies. Herbal remedies are the most prominent; in addition, women may turn to such techniques as acupuncture, biofeedback, massage, aromatherapy, or hypnosis. All of these can be valid and effective options, though most women find that herbal remedies are the easiest alternative treatment to follow, as the others require greater time and monetary commitment. In addition, herbal remedies are the only viable option to treat the hormonal imbalance directly at its source.

After removing the bad stuff, you will want to replace it with good stuff. Eat a whole, real, unprocessed, organic, mostly plant-based diet with organic or sustainably raised animal products. When you focus on this type of diet, you minimize intake of xenoestrogens, hormones, and antibiotics. Taking simple steps like choosing organic food and drinking filtered water can hugely impact hormone balance.
The above symptoms of hormonal imbalance in women can indicate any one of the conditions of menopause and her ugly sisters (perimenopause and postmenopause), surgical menopause, thyroid health and adrenal fatigue. But regardless of condition, these symptoms could mean that you have a hormone imbalance. If you are experiencing these symptoms, getting tested by a highly trained bioidentical hormone doctor in order to discover the current levels of your hormones, could be the solution you have been seeking. Once we know your results, we can find that beautiful melody and relieve you of premenopause symptoms and menopausal symptoms; you do not have to live with them! You will be healthier, happier, and free to enjoy your life without the inconvenience and frustration of symptoms resulting from premenopause, menopause, or any of the others.
I am so glad I have found this website. I think my hormones have been a bit off since college (10 years ago) but I started with a bad depression about 6-7 years ago then after I had my first child (3 years ago) everything changed. I started to get stiff while I was pregnant towards the end. After I had him I couldn’t focus and felt foggy. I continued with stiffness, night sweats, irritability, moodiness, depression, and basically all of the symtoms of estrogen dominance. After my second child the concentration and memory got a lot worse. I have been seeing holistic doctors for about 3 years now and they go back and forth with chronic infections. All of my symtoms get worse around my cycle so I felt it had to be hormonal. I finally got a hormone test and all of them were generally low, but progesterone was really low and estrogen on the low side of normal. Pregnenolone was virtually absent. My cortisol was low as well. My three biggest symptoms are depression/anxiety, brain fog/ADD symptoms, and blood sugar imbalance. Oh and I have acne at 30 like I’m 15 again 🙁 I feel like I have tried quite a few detoxes and resets but I can’t eat the way I’m supposed to because I feel shaky and jittery the whole time, which then throws my mood off. Can a reproductive endocrinologist help with this? I am willing to try anything lifestyle and diet, but I’m hesitant because I feel like nothing has worked yet. Anyone in a similar boat? Thanks
Your Parsley Health team can help you to understand and resolve these imbalances.  Hormone management is a delicate, imprecise and sophisticated matter.  Remember the analogy of the game of chess.  Moving certain pieces changes the whole board, some more than others.  Some moves can be really big game changers.  And some moves can really get you into trouble.  Be sure you are working with an expert in the game.
Simply put, PMS, menopausal symptoms, and other problems are all signs of imbalances in your sex hormones. They are not the result of mutant genes that destroy our sexual vitality as we age. Instead, they are treatable symptoms of underlying imbalance in one of the core systems in your body. Get your sex hormones back in balance, and these problems will usually disappear.
Hi, I’m a 33 year old who has been suffering from hormonal imbalance since my teenage years. I was then diagnosed with endometriosis in April 2016 after having done a laporoscopy. My gynae prescribed that I take Vissanne for 6 months which I did. After a few months of taking it I went on menopause and he explained to me that was the intention. At first I was uncomfortable with the idea until he explained that I don’t really need to go on my period. This way, I save my good eggs for when I’m ready to have a child. I haven’t had any children yet.

Read on for some of the most common things that can happen when your hormones are not in balance.  Some of these hormonal imbalances can diagnosed by clinical symptoms or after a physical exam; others require simple blood tests. But remember, there could be reasons other than hormones for these conditions, so always check with your health care professional to explore other causes and rule out other problems.   

Bloating, fatigue, irritability, hair loss, palpitations, mood swings, problems with blood sugar, trouble concentrating, infertility -- these are just a few symptoms of hormone imbalance. These compounds affect every cell and system in the body. Hormone imbalance can debilitate you. Some hormonal shifts are normal, like monthly fluctuations responsible for menstruation and ovulation or the changes that occur during pregnancy. Menopause is another time for a normal hormonal shift in a woman's life. Other times these fluctuations may be due to a medication or a medical condition.


Hormones — such as estrogen, testosterone, adrenaline and insulin — are extremely important chemical messengers that affect many aspects of your overall health. Hormones are secreted by various glands and organs, including your thyroid, adrenals, pituitary, ovaries, testicles and pancreas. The entire endocrine system works together to control the level of hormones circulating throughout your body, and if one or more is even slightly imbalanced, it can cause widespread, major health problems.


Sugar is a big one. "It’s empty calories and ever-more studies show just how bad for us it is. Look at how much is in your diet, are you regularly snacking with sweet foods, are you consuming a lot of processed foods? Look at the levels your low fat choices, which we’ve been educated to believe is the healthy option, because these products often substitute fat with sugar or low-sugar substitute, which your body will still believe is sugar!"
Hi, I went into depression last year after losing my Mum in September after which my body started changing. I’ve experienced increase and tenderness in my breasts, tummy increase, dizziness on and off, headaches on and off, weakness, sadness, loss of appetite, decrease in my hips and butt. All these changes made me loss my self esteem, my clothes don’t fit well. I was prescribed for vitamin E. I need help..
Proper nutrition is essential to maintain a healthy endocrine system, which regulates hormones in the body. Try to eat a diet rich in omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids. These are found in fish oils, nuts, seeds and vegetable oils. Also, consume a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables to provide a full spectrum of vitamins and minerals. Buy organic foods when possible, and avoid foods with added hormones and chemical additives such as commercial meat, eggs and dairy products. Hormone-free and organic options are available in most supermarkets. Although soy, which has naturally occurring estrogen, can help increase estrogen levels, too much estrogen is not healthy. High estrogen levels have been associated with cancer and tumor growth.
I have read that because the Mirena delivers progesterone to the uterus only, this can cause the body to stop producing it elsewhere, and actually cause progesterone deficiency. I have also read that blood tests only show an incomplete snapshot reading of hormone levels. However, my gp assumes I have adequate progesterone and low estrogen, and has prescribed estradiol. I’m too scared to take it, as my symptoms seem more akin to estrogen dominance.
But what about natural testosterone, made by our own bodies? Well, we know that one hormone doesn’t exist in isolation in the body. For example, in a study of breast cancer risk and natural hormone levels in postmenopausal women (J Natl Cancer Inst 2003;95(16):1218-26) risk increased as body mass index increased. However, even though testosterone levels were higher in the obese women, their estrogen levels were higher still. Fatty tissue converts testosterone into estrogens, using an enzyme called aromatase, so obese postmenopausal women tend to have higher estrogen levels than lean women. The study found that it was the higher estrogen levels that accounted for the increased breast cancer risk while the higher testosterone levels had a negligible impact on risk. Another study of natural hormone levels and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women (Br J Cancer 1997; 76(3):401-5) also found that estradiol levels were more strongly associated with breast cancer risk than testosterone. The same investigators had similar results when they studied premenopausal women, in whom high estradiol (the most potent of the estrogens) and low progesterone levels were more often seen than high testosterone levels in women who developed breast cancer. In addition, women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), who tend to have higher than normal testosterone levels, do not have a higher rate of breast cancer than women without PCOS. So the testosterone circulating naturally in our bodies certainly does not seem to be the prime culprit in breast cancer risk.
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