Read on for some of the most common things that can happen when your hormones are not in balance.  Some of these hormonal imbalances can diagnosed by clinical symptoms or after a physical exam; others require simple blood tests. But remember, there could be reasons other than hormones for these conditions, so always check with your health care professional to explore other causes and rule out other problems.   

Typically, when ghosts become visible, it is always scary news. When we become aware of hormonal imbalance, when we finally catch on and feel that something is off, hormones as commanded by the brain have already made us feel vulnerable, weak, anxious, sad, dulled our memories, debilitated our thinking process, truncated our life and dissolved our relationships- sounds familiar?


Cells lining the gastrointestinal tract have receptors for both estrogen and progesterone. Levels of these hormones change throughout the course of a woman's monthly menstrual cycle. When they do, they impact the function of the gastrointestinal system. Women often experience abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, and nausea before or during their periods. These symptoms can also occur with many other conditions. If a woman experiences them along with mood changes and fatigue before or during her period, it may be more likely that the GI disturbances are occurring due to monthly hormonal fluctuations.
If you think that hormonal imbalance is limited to causing just weight gain and acne, you are overlooking the broader scenario. Hormonal imbalance can cause several nasty symptoms including interrupted menstrual cycle, loss of libido, pain in breasts, PMS, cellulite, excessive exhaustion and even cancer. The symptoms appear in your body much later than the sneaky entry of the problem itself. Therefore, once you start noticing a hint of hormonal imbalance in your body, you should visit a primary care physician in OKC, who can recommend a specialist to cure the imbalance.
If you’re experiencing symptoms of menopause, you may be tempted to try a home testing kit. Home testing kits measure follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in your urine. FSH levels increase when you enter menopause, but levels also rise and fall during a normal menstrual cycle. This test can give you an indication of whether menopause has started, but it can’t tell you conclusively.
Your hormones are produced in the major endocrine glands – your brain (hypothalamus, pineal, and pituitary glands), thyroid, parathyroid, adrenals, pancreas, and reproductive glands (ovaries and testes). Some hormones are also produced in your gastrointestinal tract. With hormones, it’s all about balance. As Goldilocks lamented (and I’m paraphrasing here), there can’t be too much or too little. Hormones have to be just right. Otherwise, a myriad of health issues can happen.
A loss of libido is the most commonly reported emotional symptom of hormonal imbalance in men. Trouble thinking clearly, often called "brain fog" is a very common symptom of hormone imbalance. Irritability and mood swings are also frequently cited. Chronic exhaustion, depression, anxiety and mood swings are common symptoms of hormonal imbalance in men and women.
Hello, my name is jessica. Im 17 years old. I am currently on the nexplanon implant for birth control and ive noticed since ive been on it (almost 3 years) ive had so much anxiety and depression. I was wondering if that was due to the birth control and if i get it taken out would my emotions go back to normal because i never had these issues before. Ive been on so many different websites looking for answers and cant get any. Is there a certain amount of time it takes after the birth control is taken out for my emotions to go back to normal?
TCM practitioners believe that the emotions of fear cause disease in your reproductive organs, kidneys and adrenals, affecting cortisol levels. This can lead to serious conditions like PCOS and infertility. The emotions of frustration, impatience and un-forgiveness cause disease in your liver, which can lead to an estrogen imbalance. And emotions of worry and anxiety can cause issues with your insulin levels, which can then affect several hormones. (11)
Hello! I’m 43 years old.i have an 8yr history with hormonal imbalance.it started with me getting periods every 15days. When I went to the doctor she said I had a cyst in my ovary. Over the years it just kept getting from bad to worse with me getting periods within 15 days to now when I don’t get a period for 3-6months..! Two years ago my doctor decided to put a marena for me and soon after that I started to put on weight and had a total loss of libido. I got it removed after 4 months. So now I have weight that I gained since the marena which is around my belly and mentally I feel like I’m going crazy most of the time! Very extreme emotions of sadness,depression etc
I get really weak in the days after my period. My ankles feel like they are being squeezed my upper legs pain me I feel like there is somebody squeezing the side of my head. It’s like I have some kind of fluid retention. The day starts okay and then as the day goes on I just get more and more tired. For the other 2 1/2 weeks in the month I am absolutely fine. I have tried evening primrose Oil and I eat lots of greens. I want to live but during the week after my period I simply don’t have the energy to do it ! Any suggestions I have been to doctors lots of times and they say that there is no physical reason why it is happening and that it is all in my mind. I’m not depressed I’m perfectly happy in the world I want to live but I just can’t And literally have to lie down

Hormonal imbalance is a result of many factors, one of which is the consumption of too much refined sugar. When you consume more sugar, the pancreas secretes more insulin. High levels of insulin can lead to the excess production of testosterone, which may prevent normal ovulation. High levels of insulin are also responsible for fat storage and weight gain. Thus, it is best to reduce the intake of refined sugar to keep your hormones well balanced.


To fully understand your hormone health, it certainly helps to know about your endocrine system and how your hormones work together to maintain homeostasis. The endocrine system is in charge of coordinating the relationship between different organs and hormones, which are chemicals that are released into your bloodstream from cells within your endocrine glands.

If you are overweight, you may have elevated estrogen levels; fat cells actually produce the hormone, so extra weight can lead to too much estrogen in the body. This can be a serious problem because excess estrogen can fuel breast and uterine cancers. During menopause, on the other hand, all women experience a natural drop in estrogen levels, along with side effects that range from hot flashes to headaches to joint pain.


“Brain fog” is a common complaint even though this is not a true medical term. It is a commonly reported symptom with many potential underlying causes. Women in perimenopause and after menopause report more memory complaints and difficulty concentrating than premenopausal women. Declining estrogen levels may be to blame, but other factors may play a role. Perimenopausal and post-menopausal women often have trouble sleeping and experience hot flashes and increased depression. These, in turn, may contribute to brain fog. Thyroid disease is another common cause of brain fog. See your doctor if you are experiencing brain fog so you can find out and treat the root cause. If declining estrogen levels are to blame, hormone replacement therapy may offer some relief and restore hormonal balance.
Dr. Jolene Brighten is a Functional Medicine Naturopathic Medical Doctor and the founder of Rubus Health, a women’s medicine clinic that specializes in women's hormones. She is recognized as a leading expert in Post-Birth Control Syndrome and the long-term side effects associated with hormonal contraceptives. Dr. Brighten is the best selling author, speaker and regular contributor to several online publications including MindBodyGreen. She is a medical advisor for one of the first data-driven apps to offer women personalized birth control recommendations.
Deborah: Welcome back. Our next guest was at the end of her rope. She was tired all the time, had muscle aches and was in a fog. To how many of you does that sound familiar? After years of doctors visits, she still didn’t feel any better until now. Please welcome Wendy Walsh and the man who got to the bottom of her health issues, Dr. Steven Hotze, with the Hotze Health & Wellness Center. He’s also the author of the book Hormones, Health, and Happiness.

So, a brain structure called the Hypothalamus controls hormonal secretions from the ovaries and all other glands in the body. It does that by intimate connections with the pituitary gland (the master gland), FYI we are still in the brain. Then the pituitary sends chemical messages broadcasted in the bloodstream to the various glands including the ovaries, thyroid and our stress gland-the adrenal.
There have been studies which have suggested that testosterone treatment might be connected to increased breast cancer (Arch Intern Med 2006;166(14):1483-9.). However, on closer inspection the women in these studies were being treated with a synthetic testosterone, methyltestosterone, which is the kind of testosterone found in Estratest. Estratest is an HRT product and is prescribed to postmenopausal women with signs of testosterone deficiency. However, methyltestosterone is not the same as the testosterone produced by our bodies, and while it has some of the same actions as testosterone, it also has some very different actions.
In the hustle and bustle of daily life, there are a lot of things that go unnoticed. But that shouldn’t be the case, especially when it comes to your health. Hormonal imbalance is one of the most common health issues that many women seem to be unaware of until they notice symptoms like acne or sudden weight gain. And not treating it in time can result in symptoms that are difficult to deal with. If you are suffering from any hormonal imbalance and want to bring your hormone levels back on track using some natural ways, this article will help you. Read on to find out how.

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Here’s a rule of thumb: Steer clear from oils high in omega-6 fats (safflower, sunflower, corn, cottonseed, canola, soybean and peanut), and load up on rich sources of natural omega-3s instead (wild fish, flaxseed, chia seeds, walnuts and grass-fed animal products). I also want to mention that there is a type of omega-6 fat that you want to get in your diet called GLA. GLA (gamma-linoleic acid) can be taken in supplement form by using evening primrose oil or borage oil, and it’s also found in hemp seeds. Studies show supplementing with GLA can support healthy progesterone levels. (4)
In feb 2016 i gave birth to 2nd child. After that 4 mnthS my cycle is regular but having heavy flow and lasts for almost 10 days.first 3 to 4 days ligbter den 2 to 3 days heavier and 2 to 3 days lighter. Till now i m facing the same. I have also put on pounds. This mnth also my periods come on tym but very light and today is 8th day i m bleeding lighter till now.

I am a fairly healthy 22 year old female and I recently got bacterial vaginosis, however I am not sexually active. The fact that there’s no known cause to this vaginal ph imbalance has made my head spin. I was looking deeper into my sleeping habits and I have pretty out of whack sleeping patterns. I sleep at unreasonable hours and usually skimp on hours. Does this cause hormonal imbalances which in result has disrupted my vaginal ph?Or perhaps it’s stress which impairs immune function? I am pretty desperate to know why I would have gotten a bacterial infection. Thanks!
Dr. Hotze: Right, a counterfeit hormone is a drug that mimics hormones that the drug companies make to mimic the hormones, rather than the Dr. prescribing the natural bio-identical hormone. They can’t patent those. We use that. That’s what I recommend. Why would we not use the same thing our body used to make? We replenish that. We fill up the tank. The hormone tank has gone empty. We fill it back up and put it at optimal levels and then the proof’s in the pudding. What happens? That was 2 and a half years ago. What happened?
Food allergies and gut issues: An expanding field of new research shows that your gut health plays a significant role in hormone regulation. If you have leaky gut syndrome or a lack of beneficial probiotic bacteria lining your intestinal wall, you’re more susceptible to hormonal problems, including diabetes and obesity. That’s because inflammation usually stems from your gut and then impacts nearly every aspect of your health. (1b)
Your gut is lined with tiny cells called receptors that respond to estrogen and progesterone. When these hormones are higher or lower than usual, you might notice changes in how you're digesting food. That’s why diarrhea, stomach pain, bloating, and nausea can crop up or get worse before and during your period. If you’re having digestive woes as well as issues like acne and fatigue, your hormone levels might be off.
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