One of the first steps in protecting the health of our breasts and preventing breast cancer, is to recognize its hormonal risk factors and begin to reduce them. According to the experts, almost all risk factors associated with breast cancer are directly or indirectly linked to an excess of estrogen, or estrogen that is not sufficiently balanced with progesterone, as is the body’s accustomed way. Also known as estrogen dominance, the condition was defined by John R. Lee, M.D., as an imbalance between estrogen and progesterone in which estrogen levels can become too high relative to inadequate progesterone levels. Dr. Lee also emphasized that estrogen can become dominant whether levels are within normal range, high, or even low, if progesterone levels are even lower, relatively speaking. This is a common condition during perimenopause when hormone levels are fluctuating, and at menopause when ovarian hormone production ceases altogether. A growing number of experts believe that correcting this fundamental imbalance is at the heart of preventing and treating breast cancer.
There has been a lot of controversy surrounding estrogen replacement, and unfortunately many doctors are still as confused as their patients on this subject. You need to see a doctor that really understands healthy aging for women and has kept up with all the latest advancements in the science of safe and effective female hormone imbalance treatment in Springville UT. This is what we offer at Renew Youth. Here’s what sets our treatment apart from the crowd:

The focus here will be on the ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. Even though they are typically called sex hormones, the brain understand them, and often interprets them in consequential ways that have nothing to do with sexuality. For example, the brain has many receptors that interpret and understand the chemical language of estrogen, that is why there are a lot of cognitive changes (memory) and emotional ones (mood) that occurs at menopause after estrogen plummets.  In fact, the body of a seventy-something man makes more than twice as much estrogen as that of a woman the same age. This is because small amounts of testosterone, which the testes produce throughout life, are converted to estrogen. 
Now such hormones are produced by pharmaceutical companies. However, they only offer standard doses, not customized formulations, and may include the specific (patented) additive of a binder, filler, preservative, dye or adhesive. (Examples include Vivelle, Prometrium, Climara). The bioidentical hormones from pharmaceutical companies come in limited doses and delivery methods.
To diagnose hormone conditions, our team will take blood and saliva tests, discuss your health and family history, and look at your overall lifestyle. If this testing shows that you have low hormones or another imbalance, you will be provided with a treatment plan. Often, hormone imbalances respond well to dietary changes and lifestyle changes. Removing inflammatory foods from the diet, for instance, can help heal the thyroid and restore a normal hormone balance. Sometimes additional hormone replacement is necessary to bring balance.
Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.
We balance all hormones, not just estrogen: The results of age-related estrogen decline cannot be corrected simply by adding more estrogen to the body. This is why our female hormone imbalance treatment in Philadelphia PA addresses all the hormones that affect menopause and aging, such as estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, thyroid, cortisol, DHEA, and growth hormone.
The above symptoms of hormonal imbalance in women can indicate any one of the conditions of menopause and her ugly sisters (perimenopause and postmenopause), surgical menopause, thyroid health and adrenal fatigue. But regardless of condition, these symptoms could mean that you have a hormone imbalance. If you are experiencing these symptoms, getting tested by a highly trained bioidentical hormone doctor in order to discover the current levels of your hormones, could be the solution you have been seeking. Once we know your results, we can find that beautiful melody and relieve you of premenopause symptoms and menopausal symptoms; you do not have to live with them! You will be healthier, happier, and free to enjoy your life without the inconvenience and frustration of symptoms resulting from premenopause, menopause, or any of the others.
Along the same lines, menopause — when a person who menstruates hasn’t had a period for one year — can also be behind hormonal imbalances, Dr. Mary O’Toole, an OB-GYN at Saddleback Medical Center in Laguna Hills, California, tells SheKnows. While the average age for a person to go through menopause is around 51, symptoms may begin as early as 45 or 46, she says.
At your appointment with Aligned Modern Health, our goal will be to get to the root cause of your symptoms to provide a good roadmap for treatment. First, your doctor will thoroughly review your health history, including a look at your family history, to rule out other health conditions that might be causing your symptoms. Be prepared to be candid at this appointment, as this will help your doctor get a more accurate diagnosis.
Could hormonal imbalance cause lightheaded sensation and feeling faint? I’ve been checked out for every other possible cause, but nothing comes back with an answer. My neck and shoulders feel sore and the back of head feels heavy. Had MRI’S, CT scans, all negative. Starting to think its something with the natural chemicals. Suggestions appreciated.
Eating a variety of foods high in short, medium and long-chain fatty acids is key to keeping your hormones in check. Your body needs various types of fats to create hormones, including saturated fat and cholesterol. Not only are these essential fats fundamental building blocks for hormone production, but they keep inflammation levels low, boost your metabolism and promote weight loss. Healthy fats have the opposite effect of refined carbohydrates, which lead to inflammation and can mess with the balance of your hormones.

A loss of libido is the most commonly reported emotional symptom of hormonal imbalance in men. Trouble thinking clearly, often called "brain fog" is a very common symptom of hormone imbalance. Irritability and mood swings are also frequently cited. Chronic exhaustion, depression, anxiety and mood swings are common symptoms of hormonal imbalance in men and women.

After hormone levels have been tested, ask your doctor if plant foods that contain phytoestrogens, which are groups of chemicals that weakly act like estrogen in the body, are right for you. According to Healthline, Non-GMO Project Verified soy is a great dietary source of phytoestrogens, specifically isoflavones, which bind to estrogen receptors in the body. While there are some conflicting studies on isoflavones and soy, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reports substantial beneficial evidence that soy foods may help address many conditions. Flaxseed is another significant source of phytoestrogens, which can help promote hormone balance if taken correctly.
Not getting enough sleep impacts our long-term brain health, memory, and hormone balance. Getting the ideal 8 hours of sleep per night allows the body to recover properly, detox, and keep hormones like cortisol, melatonin, and leptin balanced.  To maximize hormone function, I recommend getting to sleep from 10pm-6am. Here are more tips to help you optimize your sleep.
Lavender: Lavender oil promotes emotional balance, as it can help to treat anxiety, depression, moodiness and stress. It can also be used to promote restful sleep, which will help to balance your hormone levels as well. Diffuse 5 drops of lavender oil at home, add 5 drops to a warm water bath or apply 3 drops topically to your temples, back or neck or wrists.
I have so many of the issues listed. I really want to stop taking my birth control pills. They are combination pills, with a decently high amount of estrogen. The problem is, the last time I tried to quit taking them was three years ago. And that time was hell. 2 months after I stopped I had massive migraines almost daily. They only went away when I started pills back up. I never had migraines at all before that. Now I still get them here and there. I may quit again anyway since I still get migraines.
Wendy: No other answers. They said next year to come in for my checkup and I said, “I’m still not feeling well,” and they just said that was normal. There was nothing they could do for me. Finally I asked the doctor, I said, “Well, can you please run some tests just to make sure?” I said, “Something’s not right. I don’t feel well at all,” so he ran some tests and sure enough, my hormones were not balanced, so he put me on counterfeit hormones, which for a while helped and I didn’t realize that it’s kind of like a band-aid for the symptoms. It doesn’t really replenish any of the hormones that my body was needing, so for a few years I did okay, then I’d start saying, “I still don’t feel well,” so he’d put me on different ones.
I am almost desperate for answers. I’ve been on Junel Fe birth control now for 4 years after I had a cyst rupture and they found a small amount of endometriosis. I use to take Buspar for anxiety and it helped me SO much. Well I would feel better, stop taking it on and off and then 6 months ago, my anxiety was SO bad that it put me into a depressive state, which I’ve never felt. Ever since July, my anxiety comes about 2 weeks before me period and it’s super unbearable. No appetite, sleeping too much, no desire to leave my house, just awful. I told my gyno that I wanted off birth control and she said she doesn’t think my birth control has anything to do with it. Before birth control, I always had regular cycles every 28 days but would be super heavy the first 2 days. Since all this anxiety started, I was having crazy thoughts that there’s something wrong with me. I thought I had ovarian cancer and had an ultra sound but turned out to be an ovulating cyst. That’s why I think it’s weird because birth control is suppose to stop ovulation, but why am I? I don’t know what to do. I’m thinking about seeing an endocrinologist but i don’t know if that would help me get some answers.
The content of this website is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any medical condition, nor should it be used as a substitute for medical advice from a qualified physician. The information contained herein is presented in summary form only. It should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice from a physician. Only a qualified physician can determine if you qualify for treatment.

Testosterone is typically thought of as a male hormone, but both men and women have it. Low testosterone levels may cause low libido. In one study of more than 800 postmenopausal women reporting low sex drive, those who received 150 or 300 micrograms per day of testosterone in the form of a topical patch reported more sexual desire and less distress than women who received a placebo. Women receiving extra testosterone also reported more satisfying sexual experiences compared to women who took a placebo. However, women who took 300 micrograms of testosterone per day had more unwanted hair growth than women who took the placebo. Men can get low testosterone, too. The condition has been referred to as andropause in males.
Are you tired all the time? Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms of a hormone imbalance. Excess progesterone can make you sleepy. And if your thyroid -- the butterfly-shaped gland in your neck -- makes too little thyroid hormone, it can sap your energy. A simple blood test called a thyroid panel can tell you if your levels are too low. If they are, you can get treated for that.
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