Insulin is highly affected by diet because of the many different signals going on throughout the body as a result of the glucose, and resulting energy, that is produced from carbohydrate intake. Once insulin resistance develops, the muscles, fat, and liver cells don’t respond to it properly, leading to a chain reaction in the body, per Healthline. Over time, insulin resistance can lead to serious conditions like diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol, heart disease and even stroke.

Maintaining balanced hormones is complex, as many different factors can contribute to fluctuating hormone levels, especially in women. Throughout the various different stages of life, from puberty to pregnancy to menopause, hormones are naturally in flux. For many of the years in between, however, hormones may flux and become imbalanced as a result of lifestyle and environmental factors, such as high levels of stress, poor sleep, lack of exercise, and an unhealthy diet full of fat and sugar. While all factors are important to consider, monitoring sugar intake is especially key as it relates to women’s hormones.

Was diagnosed of hyperthyroidism 2013 was on thyroid medication, 2014 i had a radioactive iodine months after I became hypothyroid and have being on levothyrosine as I was told I would take it for life,I didn’t have it for a week in April as I wanted to try fruits so I had a breakdown,with emotional issues in my relationship, lots of thinking and crying, stressed out and depressed, hotness in my head ad legs,then I ran a thyroid test t3 low,t4 low,the extremely high I’m back on my medication but still feel horrible, lack of interest, hotness… Symptoms of hormone imbalance. What can I do please, I’m losing it


Read on for some of the most common things that can happen when your hormones are not in balance.  Some of these hormonal imbalances can diagnosed by clinical symptoms or after a physical exam; others require simple blood tests. But remember, there could be reasons other than hormones for these conditions, so always check with your health care professional to explore other causes and rule out other problems.   
Dr. Jolene Brighten is a Functional Medicine Naturopathic Medical Doctor and the founder and CEO of Rubus Health—a root cause women’s medicine clinic specializing in the treatment of hormone disorders, including adrenal, thyroid, and hormonal birth control related conditions. She is a recognized as an expert in Post-Birth Control Syndrome and the long term side effects associated with hormonal contraceptives. Dr. Brighten is a best-selling author, speaker, and clinical educator.
“Brain fog” is a common complaint even though this is not a true medical term. It is a commonly reported symptom with many potential underlying causes. Women in perimenopause and after menopause report more memory complaints and difficulty concentrating than premenopausal women. Declining estrogen levels may be to blame, but other factors may play a role. Perimenopausal and post-menopausal women often have trouble sleeping and experience hot flashes and increased depression. These, in turn, may contribute to brain fog. Thyroid disease is another common cause of brain fog. See your doctor if you are experiencing brain fog so you can find out and treat the root cause. If declining estrogen levels are to blame, hormone replacement therapy may offer some relief and restore hormonal balance.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
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