The endocrine system is the system of the endocrine glands in the body. The endocrine system chemically controls the various functions of cells, tissues, and organs through the secretion of hormones. The endocrine system includes the adrenal glands, parathyroid gland, pituitary gland, and thyroid gland, as well as the ovaries, pancreas, and testes.

Hormones are the body’s chemical messengers, helping to control nearly every physiological process in the body. This includes metabolism, immune functioning, the menstrual cycle, and overall reproductive health, according to Healthline. Therefore, there is a high likelihood that imbalanced hormones might be the underlying cause of many different health conditions.
The digestive system has much more of an impact on hormones than many of us realize. Not only is the digestive tract the source of many vital neurotransmitters in the body, but an imbalance in the gut can translate to an imbalance in neurotransmitter and hormones. Serotonin, a necessary neurotransmitter for sleep/stress balance is more concentrated in the gut than even in the brain! 70% of the immune system is found in the gut and it is quite literally the motherboard of many functions in the body. Even thyroid health has been linked to gut health.
Hi… For a while now I’ve been reading about the effects of hormonal imbalance in the physical appearance or physique in general… What I’m really concerned about is my broad shoulder which come off too manly and instead of the feminine shape like a normal girl would have…I ofen get insecure because I cannot wear the clothes I want because my shape seem to be too masculine for the attire (as it appears as an inverted triangle rather than an hour glass)… and just recently I checked with my doctor about my irregular menstruation to where she said that I’m having imbalances in my hormones… having too much estrogen than progesterone… Is it possible that my masculine appearance could be attributed to the said hormonal imbalance???…. and could it be addressed by intake of pills???

Because all the systems in the body are interconnected, if you have one hormone problem, you might have other ones as well. In other words, to say you have only one of these seven issues might be oversimplification – it could be all of these issues or a combination of some of these. It’s important to work with your health care provider to find out what hormone issues might actually be at play.
If you suspect that you might suffer from hormonal imbalance, the first step is to consult with a medical doctor. It is possible that your lab results are within the normal range but you still have many of the above symptoms, some of the tests are not sensitive enough to pick up on all indications of imbalance.  This just means that your journey to find alternative treatments will be a long one, but very much worth it.
If you are overweight, you may have elevated estrogen levels; fat cells actually produce the hormone, so extra weight can lead to too much estrogen in the body. This can be a serious problem because excess estrogen can fuel breast and uterine cancers. During menopause, on the other hand, all women experience a natural drop in estrogen levels, along with side effects that range from hot flashes to headaches to joint pain.
HIIT does not just help you burn those extra pounds, but it also helps in strengthening your heart and lungs and increasing the production of human growth hormone (HGH). However, if you are sweating copious amounts, be aware that you are also sweating out your minerals. As noted above, minerals are very important for keeping your hormones balanced. Keep yourself hydrated using sea salted water. Drink half your body weight (measured in pounds) in ounces of water. To every quart of drinking water add ¼ teaspoon of unrefined sea salt.
If you have hypothyroidism, a daily thyroid hormone replacement pill can help correct the imbalance. You might also want to consider eating more onion. This veggie contains kaempferol, a compound that may kick-start production of the hormone. If you have an overactive thyroid, your doctor may prescribe one of several treatments, from radioactive iodine—to slow hormone production—to surgical removal of the gland; most patients respond well once they get the proper care.
Most women have menstrual cycles that last between 21 and 35 days. Up to one quarter of women experience irregular periods. This includes having periods that are shorter or longer than usual or periods that are lighter or heavier than usual. Some women who have irregular periods may experience abdominal cramping or a lack of ovulation. Amenorrhea is a medical term that refers to the an absence of periods for at least 3 months even though a woman is not pregnant. Menorrhagia is a disorder that causes excessive menstrual bleeding. Dysmenorrhea causes pain and cramping during periods. Prolonged menstrual bleeding involves periods in which bleeding routinely lasts for 8 days or longer. Oligomenorrhea is a condition in which periods occur infrequently or more than every 35 days. See your doctor if you believe hormonal imbalance is affecting your menstrual cycle.
Hi I have been taking oral prog and T cream now for 9 months and I still have anxiety, sleep issues , sweating at night. I had a partial hyste and last March was thoroughly tested and told my Prog was low and T which was causing all my symptoms. I had been basically non functional before that with depression and anxiety. The thing is I am not like I was but still struggling and don’t feel myself. They have adjusted my hormones down and now back up several times and it’s not helping. I still have the symptoms just not the horrible dep. I also have some issues with my hands going numb at tines and tingling and weird body sensations like burning skin feeling almost and chest pressure. Could this be bc I do have adrenal fatigue or maybe I just on to much of the hormones?.if it is adrenal like to hi cortisol how can that be fixed ? Would that have caused my awful depression and anxiety in first place and that maybe all.i needed was to address that ? Or maybe do I need both hormones and that to be fixed. HELP I am so confused i don’t know what to think

Dr. Hotze: Low thyroid and imbalance of the female hormones, but low thy-, that’s a classical finding in hypothyroid patients. Unfortunately, most physicians don’t think about thyroid problems, and if they do, they use a blood test only to make the diagnosis and the blood test is so broad, so wide, so large, that 95% of the people fall within the range, so there’s literally millions of people, I’ve figured 70 million people walking around America today that are hypothyroid …
Feeling bloated, irritable, or just not your best? A hormone imbalance could be to blame. Hormones are chemical “messengers” that impact the way your cells and organs function. It’s normal for your levels to shift at different times of your life, such as before and during your period or a pregnancy, or during menopause. But some medications and health issues can cause them to go up or down, too.
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