If you do all those things but are still not finding relief, Goldstein says a low dose birth control pill might be the answer. The Pill works differently than hormone replacement therapy, which adds more hormones on top of the ones that are already fluctuating, sometimes making the imbalance worse. "The Pill," he says, "shuts down your hormone production completely and gives you a small, even, metered dose that is the same day in and day out. That way, he says, "you don't feel the bumps in the road as much."

We use cookies and similar technologies to improve your browsing experience, personalize content and offers, show targeted ads, analyze traffic, and better understand you. We may share your information with third-party partners for marketing purposes. To learn more and make choices about data use, visit our Advertising Policy and Privacy Policy. By clicking “Accept and Continue” below, (1) you consent to these activities unless and until you withdraw your consent using our rights request form, and (2) you consent to allow your data to be transferred, processed, and stored in the United States.
Bloating, fatigue, irritability, hair loss, palpitations, mood swings, problems with blood sugar, trouble concentrating, infertility -- these are just a few symptoms of hormone imbalance. These compounds affect every cell and system in the body. Hormone imbalance can debilitate you. Some hormonal shifts are normal, like monthly fluctuations responsible for menstruation and ovulation or the changes that occur during pregnancy. Menopause is another time for a normal hormonal shift in a woman's life. Other times these fluctuations may be due to a medication or a medical condition.
Here’s a rule of thumb: Steer clear from oils high in omega-6 fats (safflower, sunflower, corn, cottonseed, canola, soybean and peanut), and load up on rich sources of natural omega-3s instead (wild fish, flaxseed, chia seeds, walnuts and grass-fed animal products). I also want to mention that there is a type of omega-6 fat that you want to get in your diet called GLA. GLA (gamma-linoleic acid) can be taken in supplement form by using evening primrose oil or borage oil, and it’s also found in hemp seeds. Studies show supplementing with GLA can support healthy progesterone levels. (4)
Of course, there is little mid-life women can do to reverse normal physiology and aging ovaries, although they can diligently guard against undue stress that can speed up the process. But growing numbers of younger women are showing signs of estrogen dominance as a result of anovulatory cycles (failure to ovulate) linked to an unbalanced lifestyle: chronic stress, crash diets, exposure to synthetic hormones used in birth control pills, and growth hormones in feedlot beef and dairy products, as well as xenoestrogens found in numerous personal hygiene and household products.

I have been having problem with my period since last year June and it’s really depressing.it all started when I was posted to HIV unit during my IT and seeing those patients make me depressed I couldn’t remove the thought from my head and days later I started getting strange symptoms like shaking of the hands,legs,chronic headache that lasted for days and then d following month my period changes,it really hurts which is also accompany by brown blood instead of red.can someone please help me out.i will appreciate.
The good news: There are things you can do. For many the answer lies in natural herbs and supplements, like black cohosh and red clover. Though medical studies remain conflicted over the effectiveness of these remedies, some women report relief. And while HRT was found to have a laundry list of nasty side effects, Goldstein says that for some women, short term use can still be the appropriate answer, particularly for hot flashes.

I get really weak in the days after my period. My ankles feel like they are being squeezed my upper legs pain me I feel like there is somebody squeezing the side of my head. It’s like I have some kind of fluid retention. The day starts okay and then as the day goes on I just get more and more tired. For the other 2 1/2 weeks in the month I am absolutely fine. I have tried evening primrose Oil and I eat lots of greens. I want to live but during the week after my period I simply don’t have the energy to do it ! Any suggestions I have been to doctors lots of times and they say that there is no physical reason why it is happening and that it is all in my mind. I’m not depressed I’m perfectly happy in the world I want to live but I just can’t And literally have to lie down
A breakout before or during your period is normal. But acne that won’t clear up can be a symptom of hormone problems. An excess of androgens (“male” hormones that both men and women have) can cause your oil glands to overwork. Androgens also affect the skin cells in and around your hair follicles. Both of those things can clog your pores and cause acne.
×