Although it was many years ago, I still remember one of the first patients I saw with a hormonal disturbance. She was a lovely woman in her early 40s who was a little heavy; despite having tried every diet under the sun, she couldn't seem to shed the extra pounds. As we talked and she mentioned a few more of her concerns—dry skin, brittle hair, a lack of energy (even shortly after her morning coffee)—I realized I needed to test her thyroid levels. Sure enough, they were too low. With proper medication, my patient's skin and energy improved, and she was no longer a prisoner to a simple chemical imbalance.

To diagnose hormone conditions, our team will take blood and saliva tests, discuss your health and family history, and look at your overall lifestyle. If this testing shows that you have low hormones or another imbalance, you will be provided with a treatment plan. Often, hormone imbalances respond well to dietary changes and lifestyle changes. Removing inflammatory foods from the diet, for instance, can help heal the thyroid and restore a normal hormone balance. Sometimes additional hormone replacement is necessary to bring balance.


This primary level of treatment involves the least amount of risk, though conversely it requires the highest amount of self-discipline. Many times some simple changes in lifestyle can reap huge benefits in fighting symptoms caused by hormonal imbalance, and achieving a higher overall level of health. Fundamentally, techniques for stress reduction, such as yoga or meditation, combined with regular exercise and an improved diet, can do a woman great service. Diet in particular is key.
After removing the bad stuff, you will want to replace it with good stuff. Eat a whole, real, unprocessed, organic, mostly plant-based diet with organic or sustainably raised animal products. When you focus on this type of diet, you minimize intake of xenoestrogens, hormones, and antibiotics. Taking simple steps like choosing organic food and drinking filtered water can hugely impact hormone balance.
I get really weak in the days after my period. My ankles feel like they are being squeezed my upper legs pain me I feel like there is somebody squeezing the side of my head. It’s like I have some kind of fluid retention. The day starts okay and then as the day goes on I just get more and more tired. For the other 2 1/2 weeks in the month I am absolutely fine. I have tried evening primrose Oil and I eat lots of greens. I want to live but during the week after my period I simply don’t have the energy to do it ! Any suggestions I have been to doctors lots of times and they say that there is no physical reason why it is happening and that it is all in my mind. I’m not depressed I’m perfectly happy in the world I want to live but I just can’t And literally have to lie down
Sleep helps keep stress hormones balanced, builds energy and allows the body to recover properly. Excessive stress and poor sleep are linked with higher levels of morning cortisol, decreased immunity, trouble with work performance, and a higher susceptibility to anxiety, weight gain and depression. To maximize hormone function, ideally try to get to bed by 10 p.m. and stick with a regular sleep-wake-cycle as much as possible.

Hi. I’m seeing comments bout people gaining a few pounds from hormone imbalance and having trouble getting it off. I wish that was my problem. I literally gained 60 lbs in 60 days. I went from 125 to 185 in 2 months. I was having and still do horrific hot flashes sudden anxiety depression sluggish brain I can’t sleep . Well I sleep then awaken a few hours later so uncomfortable burning up on the inside I can’t get to a good internal temp and I’m up that’s it. I’m exhausted. I was told I was borderline hypo and was put on Synthroid at 88 mg it did nothing so I doubled it but it made me have headaches so I cut back to 132 and it still is t doing any good . Docs put me in on birth Control for the hot flashes but your article makes it sound like that was a big mistake! It did help a lot but I still do get them and when I do now ( at least


Typically, when ghosts become visible, it is always scary news. When we become aware of hormonal imbalance, when we finally catch on and feel that something is off, hormones as commanded by the brain have already made us feel vulnerable, weak, anxious, sad, dulled our memories, debilitated our thinking process, truncated our life and dissolved our relationships- sounds familiar?
There are many reasons why someone may be having difficulty sleeping.  But if it’s persistent, it’s likely related to your hormones.  Melatonin, the well-known sleep chemical, is a hormone released by the pineal gland in the brain.  As a hormone, it is intimately related and affected by the other hormones.  You can think of the different hormones as pieces in a complicated game of chess.  If you move one, it affects all the others and they have to move accordingly.  With certain moves, things can get dangerous.  If you are not sleeping well, it would be wise to have a professional assist you in holistically determining why.  Conversely, if you are imbalanced for other reasons, appropriate rest is necessary to help bring things back into balance.
Food allergies and gut issues: An expanding field of new research shows that your gut health plays a significant role in hormone regulation. If you have leaky gut syndrome or a lack of beneficial probiotic bacteria lining your intestinal wall, you’re more susceptible to hormonal problems, including diabetes and obesity. That’s because inflammation usually stems from your gut and then impacts nearly every aspect of your health. (1b)

Proper nutrition is essential to maintain a healthy endocrine system, which regulates hormones in the body. Try to eat a diet rich in omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids. These are found in fish oils, nuts, seeds and vegetable oils. Also, consume a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables to provide a full spectrum of vitamins and minerals. Buy organic foods when possible, and avoid foods with added hormones and chemical additives such as commercial meat, eggs and dairy products. Hormone-free and organic options are available in most supermarkets. Although soy, which has naturally occurring estrogen, can help increase estrogen levels, too much estrogen is not healthy. High estrogen levels have been associated with cancer and tumor growth.
My daughter had been on the birth control pills since she was 16 (8 years now) because of cysts in her ovaries. She has had lots of UTIs, about 2 a year since then. 2017 she had 4. The urologist looked closer into it and discovered that they all haven’t been UTIs after all. Most of the cultures came back from the lab as negative. He now saying she has interstitial cystitis. We have notice that most of her bladder flare ups are right before her period. She is in such pain during that time. And I started researching and it seems to me she might have a hormonal imbalance due to the birth control pills. I’m wondering if she gets off the pill if all her problems would go away or would getting off the pill make it worse? I’m thinking the pills has cause her problem? Tell me what you think?
A variety of things may trigger headaches, but a decrease in estrogen levels is a common cause in women. If headaches occur routinely at the same time every month, just prior to or during a period, declining estrogen may be the trigger. If hormonal headaches are particularly bad, a doctor may prescribe birth control pills to keep estrogen levels more stable throughout the cycle. Try over-the-counter pain relievers to ease headache pain. If you need something stronger, a doctor may prescribe a triptan or other medication to treat and prevent headaches. Eating right, exercising, avoiding stress, and getting adequate sleep will help you minimize PMS symptoms and headaches.
Fatigue, mood instability, weight gain, foggy brain/memory loss, adult acne, hair loss/facial hair, lower sex drive, extreme PMS slide. These symptoms do not just reduce quality of life but they also increase chances of stroke, heart disease, cancer and of course gynecological problems (endometriosis, fibroid, tumors and cysts). There are solutions, don't just acquiesce to lower quality of life. And even if you accept such low standards of functionality, this might amount to truncating your life.  
The Labs: Mainstream medicine typically just runs TSH and T4 (inactive thyroid hormone) to determine thyroid hormone dosage. A functional medicine thyroid panel involves looking at many other labs such as Free and Total T3 (active thyroid hormone), Reverse T3, and thyroid antibodies to rule out autoimmune thyroid problems. For a full list of thyroid labs and how to interpret them, read my previous article here.

If you’ve been diagnosed with a hormone imbalance, it’s critical to get to the root cause of your problem before deciding on a course of treatment. While hormone replacement therapy can help your symptoms, it does not address the underlying cause. Aligned Modern Health takes an approach that believes in getting to the root cause of health concerns, illness and disease, including hormone imbalances.

But when you suspect hormone imbalance, mainstream medicine typically runs only basic labs. If your labs don’t come back “normal,” you’re typically given a synthetic hormone cream or pill that could have side effects. If those labs come back “normal” and you’re still experiencing symptoms, you may be told you’re either depressed, just getting older, or need to lose weight.
The certified practitioners in the BioTE Medical network are trained in advanced hormone replacement therapy. Frequently men reach for coffee, a pharmaceutical medication or one of those “little blue pills” that ignore the cause of their struggles. If you are tired of being sick and tired, consider solving your problems once and for all by seeking BHRT hormone therapy pellets from BioTE Medical. With thousands of practitioners throughout the United States, it is likely that you will be able to choose from several providers near you. Click here to start your journey! The goal in doing so is that not only will you better understand these hormone imbalance symptoms but be able to tackle them head on!
In the years preceding menopause, a woman may suffer from decreased testosterone as her ovaries and adrenal glands slow the production of sex hormones. This may explain why many women experience a drop in libido during this period of their lives. Excess testosterone, however, may be the result of a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); possible symptoms include irregular periods, male-pattern baldness, a deepening voice, and excess body hair.
A lack of sleep, long-term use of corticosteroids and chronic stress are three of the biggest contributors to high cortisol levels. A report published in the Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism stated that “Stress can lead to changes in the serum level of many hormones including glucocorticoids, catecholamines, growth hormone and prolactin.” (19)
Some close friends also agreed to warn me if my mood seemed especially up or especially down. I did have a couple of manic periods (cleaning house from top to bottom three days after a total hysterectomy ??? bad idea!) ??? but for the most part, my mood during menopause was fairly even thanks to medication, regular counseling sessions and lots of support from friends and family.
Our adrenal glands secret several hormones, and one of them is cortisol, your body’s primary stress hormone. Adrenal fatigue happens when there’s an imbalance in this cortisol rhythm: Cortisol is high when it should be low, low when it should be high, or always high or always low. Adrenal fatigue is really a dysfunction of your brain’s communication with your adrenals – not the adrenal glands themselves. Because adrenal fatigue is mainly a brain stress problem, the functional medicine solution focuses on minimizing chronic stressors.
I get really weak in the days after my period. My ankles feel like they are being squeezed my upper legs pain me I feel like there is somebody squeezing the side of my head. It’s like I have some kind of fluid retention. The day starts okay and then as the day goes on I just get more and more tired. For the other 2 1/2 weeks in the month I am absolutely fine. I have tried evening primrose Oil and I eat lots of greens. I want to live but during the week after my period I simply don’t have the energy to do it ! Any suggestions I have been to doctors lots of times and they say that there is no physical reason why it is happening and that it is all in my mind. I’m not depressed I’m perfectly happy in the world I want to live but I just can’t And literally have to lie down
Many women are affected negatively by hormonal imbalance. To begin explaining why that is, let's settle on a location. Which organ is the culprit? You might have guessed, the ovaries. Really good educated guess, but not entirely correct. We start the story of the nasty effects of hormonal imbalance in women in the brain, yes in the head not down there. For the full story, you can listen to the TEDx talk: "The brain and ovarian hormones".
If you’ve been diagnosed with a hormone imbalance, it’s critical to get to the root cause of your problem before deciding on a course of treatment. While hormone replacement therapy can help your symptoms, it does not address the underlying cause. Aligned Modern Health takes an approach that believes in getting to the root cause of health concerns, illness and disease, including hormone imbalances.
First off, thanks for this article. That part at the end made me tear up, I’m sort of having a bad moment. I ran across this because I searched google “if my hormones are imbalanced will it age me” long story short.. family history of endometriosis and hormone issues related to diet. . I follow a strict lifestyle of no meat, absolutely no preservatives, I go back and forth with allowing fish and dairy into my life when I’m feeling particularly gaunt.. I drink water or plain almond milk. I basically avoid refined sugars or anything processed at all. Anyway, my Ob/gyn who specializes in fertility and hormones started me on this charting thing to track my cycles and ovulation in order to begin me on a regimen of the “bio-identical” hormones. After doing a hormone panel at peak+3,5,7,9 he saw that my estrogen and progesterone dropped very low, so he prescribed estradiol and progesterone. I ended up refusing to take these because I don’t like to mess with my natural chemistry and I’m so anti- anything unnatural. But tonight looking at my face which seems to be aging, my disrupted sleep pattern and some minor depression.. I thought, could these pills help? Am I doing myself a disservice by NOT taking them? Most importantly at that moment, is it AGING me not to take them? Lol. Silly I know. If you could offer some advice I would heed it after reading what you’ve said. Thanks and thanks again, 🙂
If you aren’t getting enough shut-eye, or if the sleep you get isn’t good, your hormones could be at play. Progesterone, a hormone released by your ovaries, helps you catch zzz's. If your levels are lower than usual, that can make it hard to fall and stay asleep. Low estrogen can trigger hot flashes and night sweats, both of which can make it tough to get the rest you need.
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