Interventions at the third level involve the highest risk and often the highest costs. The most common drug therapy for treating mood swings in the U.S. is HRT. This may be a quick and intense way to combat the underlying hormonal imbalance; unfortunately, it entails serious side effects and increases the risk of different types of cancer among women, as the following study has proven.
Replace the right thyroid hormones. Most doctors will only prescribe T4 (such as Synthroid), the inactive form of thyroid hormone your body must convert to its active form T3. Most people do better on bioidentical hormones (like Armour, Westhroid or Nature Throid) or a combination of T4 and T3. A Functional Medicine doctor who understands how to optimize thyroid balance can customize a nutrient protocol.
Hi, Im 27 years old. Last 3 years I have problem with my period, I had a stressful work and life time period and my doctor always gave me contraceptive pills. It’s been 1 month i had not got menstrual period. Мy doctor again wants to give me contraceptive pills, but I do not think that’s the solution. Also im vegetarian. Any suggestions about what to do?

In 1991 The National Institute of Health (NIH) launched the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), the largest clinical trial ever undertaken in the United States. The WHI was designed to provide answers concerning possible benefits and risks associated with use of HRT. This study was canceled in July 2002, after it was proven that synthetic hormones increase risks of ovarian and breast cancer as well as heart disease, blood clots, and strokes. The findings were published in JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association, and to this date have not been disputed.
Urine testing: A urine hormone test requires that you collect every drop of urine for a 24-hour period. Then your urine is tested to identify each hormone that is present and at what levels on that particular day. This is the most extensive hormone health test because it measures your hormone levels throughout the entire day, instead of the levels for a moment in time, which is the case for blood and saliva tests.
In 1991 The National Institute of Health (NIH) launched the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), the largest clinical trial ever undertaken in the United States. The WHI was designed to provide answers concerning possible benefits and risks associated with use of HRT. This study was canceled in July 2002, after it was proven that synthetic hormones increase risks of ovarian and breast cancer as well as heart disease, blood clots, and strokes. The findings were published in JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association, and to this date have not been disputed.
To diagnose hormone conditions, our team will take blood and saliva tests, discuss your health and family history, and look at your overall lifestyle. If this testing shows that you have low hormones or another imbalance, you will be provided with a treatment plan. Often, hormone imbalances respond well to dietary changes and lifestyle changes. Removing inflammatory foods from the diet, for instance, can help heal the thyroid and restore a normal hormone balance. Sometimes additional hormone replacement is necessary to bring balance.
Alternative approaches involve little to no risk and can be an extremely effective way to treat all types of hormonal imbalance. This level of approach can involve several different therapies. Herbal remedies are the most prominent; in addition, women may turn to such techniques as acupuncture, biofeedback, massage, aromatherapy, or hypnosis. All of these can be valid and effective options, though most women find that herbal remedies are the easiest alternative treatment to follow, as the others require greater time and monetary commitment. In addition, herbal remedies are the only viable option to treat the hormonal imbalance directly at its source.

Dr. Hotze: Right, a counterfeit hormone is a drug that mimics hormones that the drug companies make to mimic the hormones, rather than the Dr. prescribing the natural bio-identical hormone. They can’t patent those. We use that. That’s what I recommend. Why would we not use the same thing our body used to make? We replenish that. We fill up the tank. The hormone tank has gone empty. We fill it back up and put it at optimal levels and then the proof’s in the pudding. What happens? That was 2 and a half years ago. What happened?

Hi, I am 62 year old african american femal and have hypothyroidism i take Levothyroxine 1 tablet daily which my doctor said i will be taking for the rest of my life. I have had a partial hystorectomy which means i still have my overies. I have severe hot flashes, trouble getting a good nights sleep because of the hot flashes and have noticed i am getting several dark patchy spots on my body could these spots be the result of hormonal imbalance?
Hi my name is Lorraine i am seeing a naturopath for weight loss because i am finding extremely difficult to loss weight. I have done a saliva test and it came back that my oestrogen levels are at 55 and my progesterone is low testosterone is low cortisol goes the opposite way it increases at night. Im taking o clear calcium d glucarate but it not decreasing.
Hormones — such as estrogen, testosterone, adrenaline and insulin — are extremely important chemical messengers that affect many aspects of your overall health. Hormones are secreted by various glands and organs, including your thyroid, adrenals, pituitary, ovaries, testicles and pancreas. The entire endocrine system works together to control the level of hormones circulating throughout your body, and if one or more is even slightly imbalanced, it can cause widespread, major health problems.
This insulin imbalance also extends to other women-specific conditions, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which is when reproductive hormones are imbalanced. Per WebMD, the symptoms of PCOS can be mild or worsen in time, and may include acne, weight gain and difficulty losing weight, excess hair on the face and body, irregular periods, fertility problems and depression. Insulin resistance is one of the main physiological imbalances in most, if not all, PCOS, as noted by experts at the Cleveland Clinic.
Most women have menstrual cycles that last between 21 and 35 days. Up to one quarter of women experience irregular periods. This includes having periods that are shorter or longer than usual or periods that are lighter or heavier than usual. Some women who have irregular periods may experience abdominal cramping or a lack of ovulation. Amenorrhea is a medical term that refers to the an absence of periods for at least 3 months even though a woman is not pregnant. Menorrhagia is a disorder that causes excessive menstrual bleeding. Dysmenorrhea causes pain and cramping during periods. Prolonged menstrual bleeding involves periods in which bleeding routinely lasts for 8 days or longer. Oligomenorrhea is a condition in which periods occur infrequently or more than every 35 days. See your doctor if you believe hormonal imbalance is affecting your menstrual cycle.

Hormones are essential to your overall wellbeing. They relay chemical messages throughout the body, helping to keep your emotions and body systems in check. One of the key body systems affected by the balance of the hormones in your body is the reproductive system. A female hormonal imbalance could cause heavy periods, infertility, and endometriosis. (Imbalances can affect other body systems, as well.)
I have been having problem with my period since last year June and it’s really depressing.it all started when I was posted to HIV unit during my IT and seeing those patients make me depressed I couldn’t remove the thought from my head and days later I started getting strange symptoms like shaking of the hands,legs,chronic headache that lasted for days and then d following month my period changes,it really hurts which is also accompany by brown blood instead of red.can someone please help me out.i will appreciate.
Functional medicine teaches us to temper this response through eating foods that modulate this response and avoiding foods that promote it.  At Parsley Health we also teach techniques such as meditation, deep breathing and modulating heart-rate variability to engage the parasympathetic relaxation side of your nervous system rather than the sympathetic “fight-or-flight” impulses.

Was diagnosed of hyperthyroidism 2013 was on thyroid medication, 2014 i had a radioactive iodine months after I became hypothyroid and have being on levothyrosine as I was told I would take it for life,I didn’t have it for a week in April as I wanted to try fruits so I had a breakdown,with emotional issues in my relationship, lots of thinking and crying, stressed out and depressed, hotness in my head ad legs,then I ran a thyroid test t3 low,t4 low,the extremely high I’m back on my medication but still feel horrible, lack of interest, hotness… Symptoms of hormone imbalance. What can I do please, I’m losing it

There are many types of hormones in the body. Some play key roles in the everyday health and well-being of women, including estrogen, testosterone and progesterone that come from the ovaries. Other hormones include, but are not limited to, thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland, cortisol from the adrenal gland and prolactin from the pituitary gland. When they're in balance, our bodies run smoothly. 
Food allergies and gut issues: An expanding field of new research shows that your gut health plays a significant role in hormone regulation. If you have leaky gut syndrome or a lack of beneficial probiotic bacteria lining your intestinal wall, you’re more susceptible to hormonal problems, including diabetes and obesity. That’s because inflammation usually stems from your gut and then impacts nearly every aspect of your health. (1b)

Hi – so my last six months since going off birth control has been awful. I was on bc for 10 years. Went off in 2015 and immeditaely got pregnant with my son -had no complications at all. Then After nursing for nine months went back on bc while I lost some weight. In August I went off birth control to try to get pregnant again. At first I had terrible perioral dermatitis, followed by hives every month. Then I got pregnant in October had terrible hives with swelling and ultimately miscarried due to not enough progesterone. My hives resolved with the miscarriage. Then again in December I got terrible hives and anaphylaxis- in Er with epi to stop the swelling. I found out I was very early (2-3 weeks) pregnant but immediately miscarried again and my progesterone was really low again – at 7 days preg pos blood test – progesterone.19; 3 days later .21 (hcg 7). I started bleeding almost immediately and miscarriage again. Since then I have not let myself get pregnant again – but each month I get hives (Not as bad) and perioral dermatitis. I’ve seen functional doctors and my inflammation is terrible – my progesterone at 7 days post ovulation was under .5. My testosterone was also low. And my estrogen is also low – and estridol and estrone ratio is backwards. I may also have PCOS. I have Hashimotos hypothyroidism. I suffer from terrible periods,spotting, pain, headaches and consfipation. I feel that my low hormones are the root of all my problems but don’t know how to fix it. Do you have any suggestions or ideas of what else I could do or what is happening to me?
Although it was many years ago, I still remember one of the first patients I saw with a hormonal disturbance. She was a lovely woman in her early 40s who was a little heavy; despite having tried every diet under the sun, she couldn't seem to shed the extra pounds. As we talked and she mentioned a few more of her concerns—dry skin, brittle hair, a lack of energy (even shortly after her morning coffee)—I realized I needed to test her thyroid levels. Sure enough, they were too low. With proper medication, my patient's skin and energy improved, and she was no longer a prisoner to a simple chemical imbalance.
Urine testing: A urine hormone test requires that you collect every drop of urine for a 24-hour period. Then your urine is tested to identify each hormone that is present and at what levels on that particular day. This is the most extensive hormone health test because it measures your hormone levels throughout the entire day, instead of the levels for a moment in time, which is the case for blood and saliva tests.
The endocrine system is the system of the endocrine glands in the body. The endocrine system chemically controls the various functions of cells, tissues, and organs through the secretion of hormones. The endocrine system includes the adrenal glands, parathyroid gland, pituitary gland, and thyroid gland, as well as the ovaries, pancreas, and testes.
"Every woman thinks that it's the sudden drop in estrogen from not ovulating that causes the problems. But in reality, it's the fluctuation of estrogen, along with less progesterone, that is behind many of the typical symptoms of perimenopause," Goldstein says. These symptoms, he tells WebMD, include not only mood swings and sensitivity, but also hot flashes, night sweats, and memory problems.

Vitamin D: Vitamin D almost acts like a hormone inside the body and has important implications for keeping inflammation levels low. This is why people who live in dark areas often suffer from seasonal depression and other health problems unless they supplement with vitamin D. Sunshine is really the best way to optimize vitamin D levels because your bare skin actually makes vitamin D on its own when exposed to even small amounts of direct sunlight. Most people should supplement with around 2,000–5,000 IU daily of vitamin D3 if they live in dark areas, during the winter, and on days when they’re not in the sun. (16)


Coconut oil contains medium-chain fatty acids that are extremely beneficial for your health and provide building blocks for hormones. These fatty acids help reduce the inflammation within your body that might have occurred due to hormonal imbalance (1). Coconut oil is also great for your overall health as it helps you lose weight by boosting your metabolism and reduces stress and anxiety (2).
I am so tired it’s awful. I am in a stressful situation and I am cold a lot also. I use low dose vaginal progesterone and half a mg. of divigel, I work out and my cortisol is high I think. I try increasing progesterone but get tired on it. Now my breasts are bigger and I am bloated all over. My doctor doesn’t help. I think I have high and low cortisol and I feel like I will never recover from this, help!
Some close friends also agreed to warn me if my mood seemed especially up or especially down. I did have a couple of manic periods (cleaning house from top to bottom three days after a total hysterectomy ??? bad idea!) ??? but for the most part, my mood during menopause was fairly even thanks to medication, regular counseling sessions and lots of support from friends and family.
Deborah: Welcome back. Our next guest was at the end of her rope. She was tired all the time, had muscle aches and was in a fog. To how many of you does that sound familiar? After years of doctors visits, she still didn’t feel any better until now. Please welcome Wendy Walsh and the man who got to the bottom of her health issues, Dr. Steven Hotze, with the Hotze Health & Wellness Center. He’s also the author of the book Hormones, Health, and Happiness.
Non-bioidentical hormones can be natural – to a horse – but not bio-chemically identical to a woman’s hormones.  They are manufactured to “act like” human estrogens.  Premarin, made from the estrogens found in pregnant mare’s urine, is an example of this.  Many women experience side effects because the chemical structure does not match a woman’s biological hormone receptors.

Ashwagandha, in particular, can be extremely effective at balancing hormones. It benefits thyroid function because it promotes the scavenging of free radicals that cause cellular damage. Ashwagandha can be used to support a sluggish or overactive thyroid, and it can also help to overcome adrenal fatigue. Your adrenals can become overtaxed when you experience too much emotional, physical or mental stress, leading to the disruption of hormones like adrenaline, cortisol and progesterone. (9)

Yes, there are lifestyle, diet and physical activity components to maintaining a healthy weight, but that isn't the end of the story. Many women have underlying hormonal imbalances that make it difficult to maintain a healthy weight. Unaddressed or emerging insulin resistance is one of the most common; small changes in diet — such as eliminating processed foods, sugars and wheat — are steps in the right direction.


I am so tired it’s awful. I am in a stressful situation and I am cold a lot also. I use low dose vaginal progesterone and half a mg. of divigel, I work out and my cortisol is high I think. I try increasing progesterone but get tired on it. Now my breasts are bigger and I am bloated all over. My doctor doesn’t help. I think I have high and low cortisol and I feel like I will never recover from this, help!
Jacinta, the birth control pill masks your hormonal problems and only make things worse. More an more women stop with the pill as a mean to balance their hormones AND birth control. More MD’s recognise this too. The ONLY thing to balance your hormones is a lifestyle change. A very good start is our Female Cycle Superpowers. We also learn you there to take other birth control methods which are completely healthy: https://www.healthcoachfx.com/female-cycle-superpowers/
One of the first steps in protecting the health of our breasts and preventing breast cancer, is to recognize its hormonal risk factors and begin to reduce them. According to the experts, almost all risk factors associated with breast cancer are directly or indirectly linked to an excess of estrogen, or estrogen that is not sufficiently balanced with progesterone, as is the body’s accustomed way. Also known as estrogen dominance, the condition was defined by John R. Lee, M.D., as an imbalance between estrogen and progesterone in which estrogen levels can become too high relative to inadequate progesterone levels. Dr. Lee also emphasized that estrogen can become dominant whether levels are within normal range, high, or even low, if progesterone levels are even lower, relatively speaking. This is a common condition during perimenopause when hormone levels are fluctuating, and at menopause when ovarian hormone production ceases altogether. A growing number of experts believe that correcting this fundamental imbalance is at the heart of preventing and treating breast cancer.
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