Hormonal imbalance is a result of many factors, one of which is the consumption of too much refined sugar. When you consume more sugar, the pancreas secretes more insulin. High levels of insulin can lead to the excess production of testosterone, which may prevent normal ovulation. High levels of insulin are also responsible for fat storage and weight gain. Thus, it is best to reduce the intake of refined sugar to keep your hormones well balanced.
If you are overweight, you may have elevated estrogen levels; fat cells actually produce the hormone, so extra weight can lead to too much estrogen in the body. This can be a serious problem because excess estrogen can fuel breast and uterine cancers. During menopause, on the other hand, all women experience a natural drop in estrogen levels, along with side effects that range from hot flashes to headaches to joint pain.
Though it used to be in vogue to prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to treat this fundamental imbalance, persistent links to breast and ovarian cancer, heart disease, and blood clots have caused most healthcare professionals to rethink this drastic option. Many agree that the most effective approach is to combine a few changes in lifestyle with alternative treatment options.
A major component of balancing your hormones naturally is addressing any emotional imbalances that you are dealing with. You can do this by reducing stress levels, engaging in personal reflection and taking time for yourself. Practicing meditation or healing prayer can be extremely beneficial, and so can deep breathing exercises, spending time outdoors and exercising every day. Traditional Chinese Medicine therapies like acupuncture and massage can also help to improve hormonal balance, combat stress and improve blood flow.
Hormones are produced in a complex process, but depend on beneficial fats and cholesterol, so lack of these important dietary factors can cause hormone problems simply because the body doesn’t have the building blocks to make them. Toxins containing chemicals that mimic these building blocks or that mimic the hormones themselves are also problematic because the body can attempt to create hormones using the wrong building blocks. Mutant estrogen anyone?
Xenoestrogens are found in feedlot beef and dairy that is pumped up with synthetic growth hormones, in household cleaners and personal care products that contain toxic chemicals, in plastics, acetones (e.g., fingernail polish and removers) and in pesticides, fungicides, herbicides and industrial pollutants. The xenoestrogens are ten to a hundred times more potent than hormones occurring naturally in the body. Like an unexpected guest that overstays its welcome, once xenoestrogens settle in, they are not easily removed.
Vitamin D: Vitamin D almost acts like a hormone inside the body and has important implications for keeping inflammation levels low. This is why people who live in dark areas often suffer from seasonal depression and other health problems unless they supplement with vitamin D. Sunshine is really the best way to optimize vitamin D levels because your bare skin actually makes vitamin D on its own when exposed to even small amounts of direct sunlight. Most people should supplement with around 2,000–5,000 IU daily of vitamin D3 if they live in dark areas, during the winter, and on days when they’re not in the sun. (16)
The trouble is that polyunsaturated fats are less stable and oxidize easily in the body, which can lead to inflammation and mutations within the body. Emerging evidence suggests that that this inflammation can occur in arterial cells (potentially increasing the chance of clogged arteries), skin cells (leading to skin mutations) and reproductive cells (which may be connected to PCOS and other hormone problems).
Hello,thanks a lot for such an amazing knowledge. I suffer from an irregular period with the longest cycle and I’ve got a broad chest and belly fat and stomach bloating too. My moods swing so easily and sometimes, crying isn’t so difficult for me. Could it be as a result of hormonal imbalances? If so how do i handle them naturally? Please help me for i really want to have children of my own.
HIIT does not just help you burn those extra pounds, but it also helps in strengthening your heart and lungs and increasing the production of human growth hormone (HGH). However, if you are sweating copious amounts, be aware that you are also sweating out your minerals. As noted above, minerals are very important for keeping your hormones balanced. Keep yourself hydrated using sea salted water. Drink half your body weight (measured in pounds) in ounces of water. To every quart of drinking water add ¼ teaspoon of unrefined sea salt.
Wendy: It got so bad that when I went to Dr. Hotze’s center about two and half years ago, I was so tired I could barely go to work. I would have to take a nap every day at lunchtime just to make it through the rest of the day. I’d go home at night and fall into bed with my clothes on. I’d sleep the whole weekend, just to save enough energy to make it through next work week. That’s how bad I’d gotten. I was depressed.

Non-bioidentical hormones can be natural – to a horse – but not bio-chemically identical to a woman’s hormones.  They are manufactured to “act like” human estrogens.  Premarin, made from the estrogens found in pregnant mare’s urine, is an example of this.  Many women experience side effects because the chemical structure does not match a woman’s biological hormone receptors.


My daughter had been on the birth control pills since she was 16 (8 years now) because of cysts in her ovaries. She has had lots of UTIs, about 2 a year since then. 2017 she had 4. The urologist looked closer into it and discovered that they all haven’t been UTIs after all. Most of the cultures came back from the lab as negative. He now saying she has interstitial cystitis. We have notice that most of her bladder flare ups are right before her period. She is in such pain during that time. And I started researching and it seems to me she might have a hormonal imbalance due to the birth control pills. I’m wondering if she gets off the pill if all her problems would go away or would getting off the pill make it worse? I’m thinking the pills has cause her problem? Tell me what you think?

Making lifestyle changes is easier said than done, especially if one is accustomed to a certain routine. In addition, while these changes will help alleviate many symptoms, they do not address the problem directly at the hormonal source and further treatment may be necessary. Alternative medicine has proven to be excellent for treatment of hormonal imbalance in a safe and natural way.
Hi – so my last six months since going off birth control has been awful. I was on bc for 10 years. Went off in 2015 and immeditaely got pregnant with my son -had no complications at all. Then After nursing for nine months went back on bc while I lost some weight. In August I went off birth control to try to get pregnant again. At first I had terrible perioral dermatitis, followed by hives every month. Then I got pregnant in October had terrible hives with swelling and ultimately miscarried due to not enough progesterone. My hives resolved with the miscarriage. Then again in December I got terrible hives and anaphylaxis- in Er with epi to stop the swelling. I found out I was very early (2-3 weeks) pregnant but immediately miscarried again and my progesterone was really low again – at 7 days preg pos blood test – progesterone.19; 3 days later .21 (hcg 7). I started bleeding almost immediately and miscarriage again. Since then I have not let myself get pregnant again – but each month I get hives (Not as bad) and perioral dermatitis. I’ve seen functional doctors and my inflammation is terrible – my progesterone at 7 days post ovulation was under .5. My testosterone was also low. And my estrogen is also low – and estridol and estrone ratio is backwards. I may also have PCOS. I have Hashimotos hypothyroidism. I suffer from terrible periods,spotting, pain, headaches and consfipation. I feel that my low hormones are the root of all my problems but don’t know how to fix it. Do you have any suggestions or ideas of what else I could do or what is happening to me?
This insulin imbalance also extends to other women-specific conditions, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which is when reproductive hormones are imbalanced. Per WebMD, the symptoms of PCOS can be mild or worsen in time, and may include acne, weight gain and difficulty losing weight, excess hair on the face and body, irregular periods, fertility problems and depression. Insulin resistance is one of the main physiological imbalances in most, if not all, PCOS, as noted by experts at the Cleveland Clinic.

We use a compounding pharmacy: Many doctors only prescribe one form of estrogen because they don’t want to go through the trouble of using a compounding pharmacy that can put two forms of estrogen in the prescription. At Renew Youth, we make the effort to ensure your female hormone imbalance treatment in Springville UT contains both estradiol and estriol for a safer outcome.


Hi I have been suffering with skin allergies/ rashes and have noiticed they become worst when I’m due for my period, then they disappear when my period has stopped? I am currently pregnant and the rash has got worst and hasn’t gone away? Iim thinking it has something to do with my hormones?? can I do anything safely to help while I’m pregnant and balance out my hormones?
Estrogen that is too high or too low may lead to changes in breast tissues. High estrogen may cause lumpy or dense breast tissue, even cysts. Estrogen levels that are too low may cause decreased breast tissue density. In one study, postmenopausal women who took estrogen plus progesterone hormone replacement therapy experienced an increase in breast density compared to women who took a placebo. Xenoestrogens are compounds that mimic estrogen function in the body. They are naturally occurring in some plants and fungi but they are also found in some drugs, industrial by-products, and pesticides. Non-naturally occurring xenoestrogens may produce a number of harmful effects in the body, including geffects on breast density and the risk of breast cancer. They also disrupt the endocrine system. If you notice any breast changes or are concerned about your estrogen levels, see your doctor for an evaluation.
Hi, I have a few questions. I am 20 yrs old and for the last 6 months my body has been completely changing and I’m not sure why. When I was 12 I started taking the birth control pill, I never had any issues, my period was always very light. When I turned 14 I became pregnant and had my daughter when I was 15. After I had her I got the depo shot. I never had my period. After about a year and a half I started to get really bad migraines to the point I couldn’t go a day without taking 4 excedrin. It got so bad I would get sick to my stomach. I then got the implant. I had that for a year and then all of a sudden I got my period every day for 3 months straight and my hair started to fall out. I haven’t been on any birth control for about a year. My period became pretty normal. But recently, about 5 months ago I took a plan b pill which made my period worse. I was sick for 3 days and constantly had headaches again. My period would be so heavy and I had the worst stomach pains. About a month after that I tried to get back on the pill. I took it for a week but started feeling nauses all the time. So I stopped taking it. Now within the last couple months I have gained and lost so much weight I’ve had to go back and forth buying different size Jeans and bras. My boobs have gone up a whole cup size, I went from a size 9 jeans, to a 1, and now I’m just in a 5. I’m not gaining any weight in my stomach or side area. Only up top and lower. I’ve been experiencing all of these symptoms, hot flashes, cold hands and feet, sleeping to much or not enough. My mood swings are all over the place. I space out all the time forgetting little things, mainly when driving I tend to lose focus and forget where I’m going or that I’m even driving. Any time I have sex I get a horrible pain that I can’t take to keep going and start to bleed right after. My periods are so unpredictable. I’ll get it for one day and it wont come back for a week. Its always heavy too. My body had been cramping and hurting so much more. Constantly cracking or feeling stiff. I’ve been getting migraines again. And just lost all motivation to do anything. I struggle with going to see my daughter when I get off work. I just haven’t been feeling myself. I know stress and change of life style is a big part of this. But honestly I thought things were getting better. I never ate right before all of this, my life went completely down hill in the worst ways. But within the last year everything has been going good. Compared to before. I’ve been eating healthier, I’m in a great relationship. I’ve been working the same job for the last 3 years. My boyfriend and I just bought our first house. Therefore I cant say I had any major stress or depression issues again until I started noticing these changes in my body. So basically is there any thing you can think of to why my body would be acting this way? Could it be because of not taking birth control since I was for so long. Or because I’ve tried so many different ones and none of them did any good for my body? It’s really been getting the best of me, physically and mentally.

Thyroid hormone regulates how fast you burn calories. One in ten women doesn't produce enough of it—a condition known as hypothyroidism, which can lead to weight gain, depression, and fatigue. On the other end of the spectrum is hyperthyroidism, in which the thyroid gland releases too much of its hormone, causing symptoms such as anxiety, a racing heart, excessive sweating, even diarrhea. 

Weight gain is a common indication of excessive estrogen production in men, especially in the chest area. This can lead to condition called gynecomastia, or development of breasts in men. This frequently happens in men struggling with obesity because estrogen can be produced by fat cells, leading to a cycle of overproduction that can quickly become vicious and difficult to break out of without pharmacological intervention. Sexual dysfunction is another common symptom.
In the hustle and bustle of daily life, there are a lot of things that go unnoticed. But that shouldn’t be the case, especially when it comes to your health. Hormonal imbalance is one of the most common health issues that many women seem to be unaware of until they notice symptoms like acne or sudden weight gain. And not treating it in time can result in symptoms that are difficult to deal with. If you are suffering from any hormonal imbalance and want to bring your hormone levels back on track using some natural ways, this article will help you. Read on to find out how.

Get a lot of natural light during the day, and spend at least 30 minutes outside each day if possible. The wide-spectrum of natural lighting helps boost serotonin levels which balance melatonin levels at night. In fact, my doctor routinely recommends that his patients get 30 minutes of sunlight or bright light within an hour of waking when they are working to balance hormones.

Along the same lines, menopause — when a person who menstruates hasn’t had a period for one year — can also be behind hormonal imbalances, Dr. Mary O’Toole, an OB-GYN at Saddleback Medical Center in Laguna Hills, California, tells SheKnows. While the average age for a person to go through menopause is around 51, symptoms may begin as early as 45 or 46, she says.
The symptoms of hormone imbalance are vague and often misdiagnosed and ignored. The only way to know is by getting your hormones checked through a blood test. This can be done in-office through saliva testing, blood testing, blood serum testing or urine testing. To get a peripheral idea of if you may be suffering from men's hormonal imbalance, take our online quiz to see if any of the symptoms mentioned seem familiar and how you score on the quiz.
Adaptogen herbs are a unique class of healing plants that promote hormone balance and protect the body from a wide variety of diseases, including those caused by excess stress. In addition to boosting immune function and combating stress, research shows that various adapotogens — such as ashwagandha, medicinal mushrooms, rhodiola and holy basil — can:
Therefore, a diet high in sugar can have significant effects on the reproductive hormones and can help explain the link between conditions such as PCOS. Sugar is intrinsically linked to estrogen, a hormone responsible for many processes in the body. Estrogen has many beneficial effects, including regulating the reproductive system as well as helping optimize the action of insulin, the hormone that prevents high blood sugar levels.
At your appointment with Aligned Modern Health, our goal will be to get to the root cause of your symptoms to provide a good roadmap for treatment. First, your doctor will thoroughly review your health history, including a look at your family history, to rule out other health conditions that might be causing your symptoms. Be prepared to be candid at this appointment, as this will help your doctor get a more accurate diagnosis.
A loss of libido is the most commonly reported emotional symptom of hormonal imbalance in men. Trouble thinking clearly, often called "brain fog" is a very common symptom of hormone imbalance. Irritability and mood swings are also frequently cited. Chronic exhaustion, depression, anxiety and mood swings are common symptoms of hormonal imbalance in men and women.
I am so tired it’s awful. I am in a stressful situation and I am cold a lot also. I use low dose vaginal progesterone and half a mg. of divigel, I work out and my cortisol is high I think. I try increasing progesterone but get tired on it. Now my breasts are bigger and I am bloated all over. My doctor doesn’t help. I think I have high and low cortisol and I feel like I will never recover from this, help!
I’m struggling with my moods and weight (weight fluctuates a lot) and this seems worse after laparoscopic surgery for endo a couple of months ago. I had a Mirena inserted, but had it removed a couple of weeks after as the side effects were awful. I’ve had horrible pmt for the past 5+years (had endo surgery 20 yrs ago too, and was ok for 10-15yrs) now I seem to get PMT during the middle of my cycle, which has always been fairly regular and not too heavy, but lasts a full 7 days. And also the week before my period. I’d hoped the latest round of surgery, and unsuccessful Mirena, would change things! I take 1-2000mgs of Vit C, SAMe and 5htp daily. Any suggestions on what may help balance me out? I’ve used natural progesterone cream in the past, which did help a bit. Thanks in advance.
You might never know this from conventional medicine, which seems to subscribe to the idea that women are destined to suffer throughout their reproductive life. Women suffer from mood and behavior swings resulting from the three P’s: Puberty, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and peri-menopause (the years leading up to and just after their final period), or the three M’s:  menstrual cramps, menopause and mental anxiety!
You might consider doing my Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet, which will naturally help reset your hormones by eliminating sugary, processed foods and food sensitivities while focusing on organic, whole, unprocessed foods. To reset female hormones, focus on specific hormone-balancing foods. Increase certain foods like flaxseeds, cruciferous veggies, good fats, and traditional organic non-GMO whole soy foods (tofu, tempeh, miso, natto, and edamame). Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of ground flaxseeds a day to your diet.
This insulin imbalance also extends to other women-specific conditions, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which is when reproductive hormones are imbalanced. Per WebMD, the symptoms of PCOS can be mild or worsen in time, and may include acne, weight gain and difficulty losing weight, excess hair on the face and body, irregular periods, fertility problems and depression. Insulin resistance is one of the main physiological imbalances in most, if not all, PCOS, as noted by experts at the Cleveland Clinic.
So, a brain structure called the Hypothalamus controls hormonal secretions from the ovaries and all other glands in the body. It does that by intimate connections with the pituitary gland (the master gland), FYI we are still in the brain. Then the pituitary sends chemical messages broadcasted in the bloodstream to the various glands including the ovaries, thyroid and our stress gland-the adrenal.

Everyone is tired sometimes. But you should recover with adequate rest, hydration and a healthy diet.  If you feel you are taking care of yourself but are still exhausted or just can’t seem to get back to your best, consider having a comprehensive evaluation of your hormone levels.  Adrenal fatigue and hypothyroidism are more prevalent in our high-paced society than you may think.
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