Some close friends also agreed to warn me if my mood seemed especially up or especially down. I did have a couple of manic periods (cleaning house from top to bottom three days after a total hysterectomy ??? bad idea!) ??? but for the most part, my mood during menopause was fairly even thanks to medication, regular counseling sessions and lots of support from friends and family.

These three levels of approaches are not mutually exclusive. A woman may use different approaches at different times or any combination of them, depending on the duration and severity of symptoms. Today, more and more women find that dealing with the symptoms of hormonal imbalance is best accomplished via a combination of healthy lifestyle and alternative treatments.


Hormone-regulating supplements. As the name suggests, this variety of herbs doesn't contain any estrogen. They stimulate a woman's hormone production by nourishing the pituitary and endocrine glands, causing them to more efficiently produce natural hormones. This ultimately results in balancing not only estrogen, but also progesterone and testosterone. Hormone-regulating supplements (e.g., Macafem) can be considered the safest way to treat the symptoms of hormonal imbalance naturally, as the body creates its own hormones and doesn't require any outside assistance.
Birth control is another dangerous medications that alters hormone levels. “The pill” is a type of hormone therapy that raises estrogen levels to such dangerous levels that it can cause many complications. I cannot urge you strongly enough to stop using the pill immediately, especially considering that there are many other (safer) ways to prevent pregnancy. My thoughts on taking the pill can be summed up this way: Just say no to birth control pills! Studies show that the risks of taking them, especially long-term, can include: (18)
Hi I’m 35 soon to be 36, over the years I have struggled getting pregnant with 7 miscarriages after a natural and no complication s what so ever with my first child Wich Will be 8 this week. This caused a separation,the struggled relationship through the up and down of the homones.i always doughted unbalanced hormones were the cause of all this. My last miscarriage was this last June. My periods are outta wack with lots of spotting in between.im a pretty stressed person in general and I’m sure this doesn’t help. My sleep is often disrupted and lately for the past 4 months, I feel depressed,lack of energy and cry easily. I’m not sure Wich hormones is not right but as u can see something is clearly wrong even if all these years doctors say everything is fine. I need help before I loose it completely. Thanks
It may help to know that we have been in the better aging business since 1999, and have been leaders in the areas of anti-aging and longevity medicine ever since. We are thriving because we pride ourselves on our integrity, and on the quality of our programs, products, and services. We are interested in long-term relationships with our clients. That can only be achieved through an honest and open relationship. You are welcome to call us and speak with us personally. We will answer your questions in a forthright manner.
Maintaining balanced hormones is complex, as many different factors can contribute to fluctuating hormone levels, especially in women. Throughout the various different stages of life, from puberty to pregnancy to menopause, hormones are naturally in flux. For many of the years in between, however, hormones may flux and become imbalanced as a result of lifestyle and environmental factors, such as high levels of stress, poor sleep, lack of exercise, and an unhealthy diet full of fat and sugar. While all factors are important to consider, monitoring sugar intake is especially key as it relates to women’s hormones.
It may help to know that we have been in the better aging business since 1999, and have been leaders in the areas of anti-aging and longevity medicine ever since. We are thriving because we pride ourselves on our integrity, and on the quality of our programs, products, and services. We are interested in long-term relationships with our clients. That can only be achieved through an honest and open relationship. You are welcome to call us and speak with us personally. We will answer your questions in a forthright manner.
Imbalances in your hormones are triggered by bad food. If you eat sugar, you’ll produce more insulin, more estrogen, and more testosterone. Any type of flour and sugar can lead to these imbalances.  Dairy and gluten are often triggers for inflammation and hormonal imbalances. Xenobiotics or environmental chemicals like pesticides in our food can act like powerful hormone disruptors and trigger our own hormones to go out of balance. If you are interested to know how these toxins disrupt our hormones then read Our Stolen Future by Theo Colburn.
Unless you get 7–8 hours of sleep every night, you’re doing your body no favors. A lack of sleep or disturbing your natural circadian rhythm can be one of the worst habits contributing to a hormone imbalance. How so? Because your hormones work on a schedule! Case in point: Cortisol, the primary “stress hormone,” is regulated at midnight. Therefore, people who go to bed late never truly get a break from their sympathetic flight/fight stress response.
Many women have unknowingly been estrogen dominant for years, resigning themselves to tender breasts, heavy bleeding, painful cramps or PMS mood swings and depression as the monthly consequence of “the curse.” But behind this all-too-familiar symptom picture lurks the greater health impact of hormone imbalance. “For women with undetected estrogen dominance,” writes co-author Virginia Hopkins, in the popular John Lee books on menopause, “Being put on synthetic hormones when they reach menopause is like pouring gasoline on a fire in terms of breast cancer risk.”
Hormone balance is deeply connected to the food we eat, the exercise we get, the toxins we absorb, the weight we carry, and the stress levels we put up with. How these multiple factors impact the overall hormone picture is crucial, particularly at midlife when most hormone production is taken over by the adrenal glands. If stress takes center stage in our lives and becomes chronic, cortisol floods the system and total hormone production lags. This forces the body to steal from its own supplies of available progesterone, to make more cortisol, thus depleting this key balancing hormone with obvious implications for estrogen dominance. Prolonged stress tears up our bones, melts our muscles, robs us of strength and energy, lowers our libido and overwhelms our immunities, putting us at serious risk for chronic illness and autoimmune disease.
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