Yes, there are lifestyle, diet and physical activity components to maintaining a healthy weight, but that isn't the end of the story. Many women have underlying hormonal imbalances that make it difficult to maintain a healthy weight. Unaddressed or emerging insulin resistance is one of the most common; small changes in diet — such as eliminating processed foods, sugars and wheat — are steps in the right direction.
It’s not “all in your head”.  Neuroendocrinology is the study of the intimate relationship of the neurotransmitters, or chemical messengers of the brain, and hormones.  Excess adrenal stimulation due to the outrageous stress that we subject ourselves to has become a silent epidemic.  Cortisol and norepinephrine, produced and released by the adrenal glands, often underlie the feelings that you may perceive as anxiety.

Natural Progesterone Cream– PMS and menstrual troubles are often linked to specific hormone imbalances. Especially for those with short cycles or short second phase of their cycle (ovulation through start of menses), progesterone can be the issue. I’ve seen people add only natural progesterone cream and see symptoms greatly reduce. If you do use progesterone cream, do you own research, make sure you have a good brand that is soy-free and only use for the second half of your cycle (ovulation through menses). Check with a doctor or professional before using any hormone supplement.


Are you constantly feeling tired and depressed? Have you been unable to lose weight, or noticed sudden weight gain? Is your skin breaking out like a teenager, but you’re well into your 30s? If you’re noticing these types of problems, you may have a hormone imbalance. Whether you have been professionally diagnosed with an imbalance or are wondering if you have one, Aligned Modern Health is ready to assist you in making the necessary changes to get back on the road to wellness.
For many women, night sweats and hot flashes are the first uncomfortable sign that something is amiss. This isn't the time to start hormone replacement therapy, but begin a food journal by jotting down what you eat and drink, how you feel physically, and any emotions that come up after. Many times our emotions are the trigger that increases internal temperature. The next time you feel the flashes coming on, stop and think about the thoughts swirling around in your mind.
In any case, there is much women of all ages can do to rebalance progesterone and overall hormone levels to avoid becoming estrogen dominant. First, we can work with a provider to test our hormone levels for imbalances. If testing reveals estrogen dominance, we can take steps to restore the natural equilibrium by rebalancing with bioidenticals—hormones derived from plant compounds that are made to be identical in structure and function to those our body makes naturally.
I am so glad I have found this website. I think my hormones have been a bit off since college (10 years ago) but I started with a bad depression about 6-7 years ago then after I had my first child (3 years ago) everything changed. I started to get stiff while I was pregnant towards the end. After I had him I couldn’t focus and felt foggy. I continued with stiffness, night sweats, irritability, moodiness, depression, and basically all of the symtoms of estrogen dominance. After my second child the concentration and memory got a lot worse. I have been seeing holistic doctors for about 3 years now and they go back and forth with chronic infections. All of my symtoms get worse around my cycle so I felt it had to be hormonal. I finally got a hormone test and all of them were generally low, but progesterone was really low and estrogen on the low side of normal. Pregnenolone was virtually absent. My cortisol was low as well. My three biggest symptoms are depression/anxiety, brain fog/ADD symptoms, and blood sugar imbalance. Oh and I have acne at 30 like I’m 15 again 🙁 I feel like I have tried quite a few detoxes and resets but I can’t eat the way I’m supposed to because I feel shaky and jittery the whole time, which then throws my mood off. Can a reproductive endocrinologist help with this? I am willing to try anything lifestyle and diet, but I’m hesitant because I feel like nothing has worked yet. Anyone in a similar boat? Thanks
Despite potential drawbacks, there are some cases in which hormone replacement and medications are helpful and even necessary for women whose symptoms are unmanageable. Occasionally, despite lifestyle therapies – diet, exercise, stress reduction, nutrient supplementation, and herbs – hormone therapy can be lifesaving (as well as mood- and brain-saving).

It is well known that exercise helps regulate hormone levels. Regular exercise strengthens the endocrine system, which, again, is responsible for the regulation of all hormones. The Pro Health Library cites several studies on hormone imbalance and exercise. In addition to regulating hormone levels, exercise helps strengthen the immune system, combat stress, increase energy and improve overall quality of life. It is important to get 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise each day. This may include jogging, biking, swimming or even a brisk walk.
First week of July I was diagnosed again of having hemorrhagic cyst on both of my ovaries. That was the only time that an obygene confirmed that im having this so called hormonal imbalance, and it cause me my acne breakout, weight gain, anxiety, sleepless night etc,! I don’t know how to start to fight my condition. I lost my self steam by looking at my face full of acne for a long time now. I have read your article and I was enlightened. I just need someone to push me and tell me it’s not too late I can still do something for my condition. Thanks for your very reliable article. It’s been helpful.
I am almost desperate for answers. I’ve been on Junel Fe birth control now for 4 years after I had a cyst rupture and they found a small amount of endometriosis. I use to take Buspar for anxiety and it helped me SO much. Well I would feel better, stop taking it on and off and then 6 months ago, my anxiety was SO bad that it put me into a depressive state, which I’ve never felt. Ever since July, my anxiety comes about 2 weeks before me period and it’s super unbearable. No appetite, sleeping too much, no desire to leave my house, just awful. I told my gyno that I wanted off birth control and she said she doesn’t think my birth control has anything to do with it. Before birth control, I always had regular cycles every 28 days but would be super heavy the first 2 days. Since all this anxiety started, I was having crazy thoughts that there’s something wrong with me. I thought I had ovarian cancer and had an ultra sound but turned out to be an ovulating cyst. That’s why I think it’s weird because birth control is suppose to stop ovulation, but why am I? I don’t know what to do. I’m thinking about seeing an endocrinologist but i don’t know if that would help me get some answers.

Typically, when ghosts become visible, it is always scary news. When we become aware of hormonal imbalance, when we finally catch on and feel that something is off, hormones as commanded by the brain have already made us feel vulnerable, weak, anxious, sad, dulled our memories, debilitated our thinking process, truncated our life and dissolved our relationships- sounds familiar?
I had a total hysterectomy at 36. I’m now 40. I was on the patch felt terrible all the time. Started the hormone pellet therapy and felt better. Every time I go for labs my estrogen is high and my testosterone is high. I have noticed increased belly fat, aging skin, cellulite, tired all the time, irritable, etc etc. I don’t know what to do will stopping all the hormones age me faster. I don’t want to be all wrinkled and saggy at 40! Any advice would be great! Thank you.
Finally, experts advise women to pay close attention to both weight and exercise, and not to take either one to extremes. "Maintaining a healthy weight - not overweight, not underweight - and exercising regularly, without overdoing it, helps to ease PMS symptoms and make them easier to cope with," says Rebecca Amaru, MD, clinical instructor of obstetrics and gynecology at the Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York City.
Deborah: Welcome back. Our next guest was at the end of her rope. She was tired all the time, had muscle aches and was in a fog. To how many of you does that sound familiar? After years of doctors visits, she still didn’t feel any better until now. Please welcome Wendy Walsh and the man who got to the bottom of her health issues, Dr. Steven Hotze, with the Hotze Health & Wellness Center. He’s also the author of the book Hormones, Health, and Happiness.
If you’ve been diagnosed with a hormone imbalance, it’s critical to get to the root cause of your problem before deciding on a course of treatment. While hormone replacement therapy can help your symptoms, it does not address the underlying cause. Aligned Modern Health takes an approach that believes in getting to the root cause of health concerns, illness and disease, including hormone imbalances.
A major component of balancing your hormones naturally is addressing any emotional imbalances that you are dealing with. You can do this by reducing stress levels, engaging in personal reflection and taking time for yourself. Practicing meditation or healing prayer can be extremely beneficial, and so can deep breathing exercises, spending time outdoors and exercising every day. Traditional Chinese Medicine therapies like acupuncture and massage can also help to improve hormonal balance, combat stress and improve blood flow.
I get really weak in the days after my period. My ankles feel like they are being squeezed my upper legs pain me I feel like there is somebody squeezing the side of my head. It’s like I have some kind of fluid retention. The day starts okay and then as the day goes on I just get more and more tired. For the other 2 1/2 weeks in the month I am absolutely fine. I have tried evening primrose Oil and I eat lots of greens. I want to live but during the week after my period I simply don’t have the energy to do it ! Any suggestions I have been to doctors lots of times and they say that there is no physical reason why it is happening and that it is all in my mind. I’m not depressed I’m perfectly happy in the world I want to live but I just can’t And literally have to lie down
Try your best to get a full night's sleep: A Stanford University study found that habitual sleep restriction (five hours a night as opposed to eight) raised a person's ghrelin levels by nearly 15 percent, lowered leptin levels by 15.5 percent, and was directly associated with increased body weight. Other research has shown that exercise and stress reduction may help keep ghrelin levels in check.

Now such hormones are produced by pharmaceutical companies. However, they only offer standard doses, not customized formulations, and may include the specific (patented) additive of a binder, filler, preservative, dye or adhesive. (Examples include Vivelle, Prometrium, Climara). The bioidentical hormones from pharmaceutical companies come in limited doses and delivery methods.
The content of this website is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any medical condition, nor should it be used as a substitute for medical advice from a qualified physician. The information contained herein is presented in summary form only. It should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice from a physician. Only a qualified physician can determine if you qualify for treatment.

Fennel: Problems with your gut health have been found to cause autoimmune reactions, including thyroid disorders. Use fennel essential oil to relax your body, improve your digestion and gut health, boost your metabolism and reduce inflammation. You can rub 2 drops of fennel into your stomach or add 1-2 drops to a class of warm water or tea to take it internally.
Breast cancer is a major concern for women of all ages. As we have discussed, excess estrogens may act as initiators of cancer or as promoters of cancer cell growth. There are concerns too about a surplus of estrogen metabolites such as estrone sulphate, the stored form of estrogen in the body, contributing to the overall estrogen burden and the growth of breast tumors. However, not all hormones are equivalent when it comes to breast cancer risk. Estriol, the weakest estrogen may have a protective effect against breast cancer. If we follow natural physiology, and the growing number of studies attesting to its protective benefits, bioidentical vs. synthetic progestin may also help to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer via its balancing effects on estrogen.
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