Wendy: No other answers. They said next year to come in for my checkup and I said, “I’m still not feeling well,” and they just said that was normal. There was nothing they could do for me. Finally I asked the doctor, I said, “Well, can you please run some tests just to make sure?” I said, “Something’s not right. I don’t feel well at all,” so he ran some tests and sure enough, my hormones were not balanced, so he put me on counterfeit hormones, which for a while helped and I didn’t realize that it’s kind of like a band-aid for the symptoms. It doesn’t really replenish any of the hormones that my body was needing, so for a few years I did okay, then I’d start saying, “I still don’t feel well,” so he’d put me on different ones.
Magnesium– Magnesium is vital for hundreds of functions within the human body and many of us are deficient in this master mineral (here’s how to tell if you are). There are several different ways to get Magnesium: In powder form with a product like Natural Calm so that you can vary your dose and work up slowly, ionic liquid form can be added to food and drinks and dose can be worked up slowly,or transdermal form by using Magnesium oil applied to the skin (this is my favorite method). Topical application is often the most effective option for those with a damaged digestive tract or severe deficiency.
The natural treatments above can still help you overcome your illness and greatly reduce symptoms, but these recommendations shouldn’t take the place of medical supervision. Because hormone imbalances vary so widely in terms of severity of symptoms, always keep track of how you’re feeling, do your research and evaluate how you respond to different treatments.
Lavender: Lavender oil promotes emotional balance, as it can help to treat anxiety, depression, moodiness and stress. It can also be used to promote restful sleep, which will help to balance your hormone levels as well. Diffuse 5 drops of lavender oil at home, add 5 drops to a warm water bath or apply 3 drops topically to your temples, back or neck or wrists.
Simply put, PMS, menopausal symptoms, and other problems are all signs of imbalances in your sex hormones. They are not the result of mutant genes that destroy our sexual vitality as we age. Instead, they are treatable symptoms of underlying imbalance in one of the core systems in your body. Get your sex hormones back in balance, and these problems will usually disappear.
I am a fairly healthy 22 year old female and I recently got bacterial vaginosis, however I am not sexually active. The fact that there’s no known cause to this vaginal ph imbalance has made my head spin. I was looking deeper into my sleeping habits and I have pretty out of whack sleeping patterns. I sleep at unreasonable hours and usually skimp on hours. Does this cause hormonal imbalances which in result has disrupted my vaginal ph?Or perhaps it’s stress which impairs immune function? I am pretty desperate to know why I would have gotten a bacterial infection. Thanks!
In feb 2016 i gave birth to 2nd child. After that 4 mnthS my cycle is regular but having heavy flow and lasts for almost 10 days.first 3 to 4 days ligbter den 2 to 3 days heavier and 2 to 3 days lighter. Till now i m facing the same. I have also put on pounds. This mnth also my periods come on tym but very light and today is 8th day i m bleeding lighter till now.

DHEA, black cohosh and don quai are all natural supplements which help balance hormone levels. DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) is the steroidal precursor to the sex hormones. In men it is converted to testosterone, and in women to estrogen. It is normally produced by the adrenal glands, but can also be taken in supplement form. Black cohosh and don quai are herbs with naturally occurring estrogen, called phytoestrogen. According to Clayton College of Natural Health, black cohosh is used by herbalists to treat menopause, menstrual problems and balance hormones. It increases circulation to reproductive organs and encourages uterine contractions. It should not be taken during pregnancy. Don quai is a Chinese herb used to treat a variety of female hormone-related issues, including menopausal hot flashes, irregular periods, PMS, anxiety and anemia-related weakness. It also increases blood flow to the pelvic region, and should not be taken during pregnancy.


Most women’s periods come every 21 to 35 days. If yours doesn’t arrive around the same time every month, or you skip some months, it might mean that you have too much or too little of certain hormones (estrogen and progesterone). If you’re in your 40s or early 50s -- the reason can be perimenopause -- the time before menopause. But irregular periods can be a symptom of health problems like polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Talk to your doctor.

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