Hi, I am suffering from hormonal imbalance and my periods are irregular. My doctor advice me two tablets one is a contraceptive(I’m 21 by the way) and he told me I should excersie. But the thing is I get so sad that I just want to cry out loud for hours, I feel so depressed and I get angry or irritated at people around me.Also my lower back hurts a lot everyday.I have acne, hair fall, migraine sometimes, stomach aches everyday, I have gained weight,I go through most of the symptoms listed above. I just don’t know what to do. And the worse thing is I feel as if none understand me or nobody cares what I’m going through. You think I have cysts? Or something bad is wrong with me? Is there a possibility?
Simply put, PMS, menopausal symptoms, and other problems are all signs of imbalances in your sex hormones. They are not the result of mutant genes that destroy our sexual vitality as we age. Instead, they are treatable symptoms of underlying imbalance in one of the core systems in your body. Get your sex hormones back in balance, and these problems will usually disappear.
The endocrine system is the system of the endocrine glands in the body. The endocrine system chemically controls the various functions of cells, tissues, and organs through the secretion of hormones. The endocrine system includes the adrenal glands, parathyroid gland, pituitary gland, and thyroid gland, as well as the ovaries, pancreas, and testes.

Hi, I have a few questions. I am 20 yrs old and for the last 6 months my body has been completely changing and I’m not sure why. When I was 12 I started taking the birth control pill, I never had any issues, my period was always very light. When I turned 14 I became pregnant and had my daughter when I was 15. After I had her I got the depo shot. I never had my period. After about a year and a half I started to get really bad migraines to the point I couldn’t go a day without taking 4 excedrin. It got so bad I would get sick to my stomach. I then got the implant. I had that for a year and then all of a sudden I got my period every day for 3 months straight and my hair started to fall out. I haven’t been on any birth control for about a year. My period became pretty normal. But recently, about 5 months ago I took a plan b pill which made my period worse. I was sick for 3 days and constantly had headaches again. My period would be so heavy and I had the worst stomach pains. About a month after that I tried to get back on the pill. I took it for a week but started feeling nauses all the time. So I stopped taking it. Now within the last couple months I have gained and lost so much weight I’ve had to go back and forth buying different size Jeans and bras. My boobs have gone up a whole cup size, I went from a size 9 jeans, to a 1, and now I’m just in a 5. I’m not gaining any weight in my stomach or side area. Only up top and lower. I’ve been experiencing all of these symptoms, hot flashes, cold hands and feet, sleeping to much or not enough. My mood swings are all over the place. I space out all the time forgetting little things, mainly when driving I tend to lose focus and forget where I’m going or that I’m even driving. Any time I have sex I get a horrible pain that I can’t take to keep going and start to bleed right after. My periods are so unpredictable. I’ll get it for one day and it wont come back for a week. Its always heavy too. My body had been cramping and hurting so much more. Constantly cracking or feeling stiff. I’ve been getting migraines again. And just lost all motivation to do anything. I struggle with going to see my daughter when I get off work. I just haven’t been feeling myself. I know stress and change of life style is a big part of this. But honestly I thought things were getting better. I never ate right before all of this, my life went completely down hill in the worst ways. But within the last year everything has been going good. Compared to before. I’ve been eating healthier, I’m in a great relationship. I’ve been working the same job for the last 3 years. My boyfriend and I just bought our first house. Therefore I cant say I had any major stress or depression issues again until I started noticing these changes in my body. So basically is there any thing you can think of to why my body would be acting this way? Could it be because of not taking birth control since I was for so long. Or because I’ve tried so many different ones and none of them did any good for my body? It’s really been getting the best of me, physically and mentally.

The endocrine system is the system of the endocrine glands in the body. The endocrine system chemically controls the various functions of cells, tissues, and organs through the secretion of hormones. The endocrine system includes the adrenal glands, parathyroid gland, pituitary gland, and thyroid gland, as well as the ovaries, pancreas, and testes.


Using essential oils for a quick massage or simply diffusing them in your surroundings is another great way to treat a hormonal imbalance. Give yourself a timeline when using essential oils. If you don’t notice that they are helping within 3-4 weeks, discontinue and try another essential oil but don’t use too many at once and don’t use them indefinitely.

Vitamin D is another important nutrient that is actually a hormone within your body. It not only reduces inflammation and balances your hormones but also boosts your overall immunity (11), (12). To activate supplemental vitamin D or sunshine vitamin D, you require magnesium, and to avoid creating magnesium deficiency, take only 1,000-2,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day. Taking both together will increase your vitamin D levels much more than taking vitamin D alone.


Beauty products are another source of chemical exposure for many people. There are tens of thousands of chemicals in the personal care products we encounter daily, and most of these chemicals have not been tested for long-term safety. Avoiding these products can make a tremendous difference in achieving hormone balance. Start by making simple switches like homemade deodorant, and homemade lotion and even DIY makeup if you’re feeling adventurous. Check out my full index of natural beauty recipes here.


For women, the most pronounced changes come in their 40s and 50s, but can been seen as early as their mid-30s. Many more women are having hormonal symptoms earlier, which has a lot to do with not only our lifestyle and diet, but also the pollution, toxins and xenoestrogens (synthetic chemicals that act as estrogen in our bodies) that we're exposed to every day.
Hello,thanks a lot for such an amazing knowledge. I suffer from an irregular period with the longest cycle and I’ve got a broad chest and belly fat and stomach bloating too. My moods swing so easily and sometimes, crying isn’t so difficult for me. Could it be as a result of hormonal imbalances? If so how do i handle them naturally? Please help me for i really want to have children of my own.

Insulin is highly affected by diet because of the many different signals going on throughout the body as a result of the glucose, and resulting energy, that is produced from carbohydrate intake. Once insulin resistance develops, the muscles, fat, and liver cells don’t respond to it properly, leading to a chain reaction in the body, per Healthline. Over time, insulin resistance can lead to serious conditions like diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol, heart disease and even stroke.
The natural treatments above can still help you overcome your illness and greatly reduce symptoms, but these recommendations shouldn’t take the place of medical supervision. Because hormone imbalances vary so widely in terms of severity of symptoms, always keep track of how you’re feeling, do your research and evaluate how you respond to different treatments.
A professional writer since 2008, Tracey Planinz writes articles on natural health, nutrition and fitness. She holds a doctorate and two professional certifications in her field, and continues to develop her education with additional classes and seminars. She has provided natural health consultations and private fitness instruction for clients in her local community.

Breast cancer is a major concern for women of all ages. As we have discussed, excess estrogens may act as initiators of cancer or as promoters of cancer cell growth. There are concerns too about a surplus of estrogen metabolites such as estrone sulphate, the stored form of estrogen in the body, contributing to the overall estrogen burden and the growth of breast tumors. However, not all hormones are equivalent when it comes to breast cancer risk. Estriol, the weakest estrogen may have a protective effect against breast cancer. If we follow natural physiology, and the growing number of studies attesting to its protective benefits, bioidentical vs. synthetic progestin may also help to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer via its balancing effects on estrogen.


Everyone is tired sometimes. But you should recover with adequate rest, hydration and a healthy diet.  If you feel you are taking care of yourself but are still exhausted or just can’t seem to get back to your best, consider having a comprehensive evaluation of your hormone levels.  Adrenal fatigue and hypothyroidism are more prevalent in our high-paced society than you may think.
Along the same lines, menopause — when a person who menstruates hasn’t had a period for one year — can also be behind hormonal imbalances, Dr. Mary O’Toole, an OB-GYN at Saddleback Medical Center in Laguna Hills, California, tells SheKnows. While the average age for a person to go through menopause is around 51, symptoms may begin as early as 45 or 46, she says.
When researchers looked at the fatty acid composition of the phospholipids in the T-cells (white blood cells), from both young and old donors, they found that a loss of saturated fatty acids in the lymphocytes was responsible for age-related declines in white blood cell function. They found that they could correct cellular deficiencies in palmitic acid and myristic acid by adding these saturated fatty acids.
Birth control is another dangerous medications that alters hormone levels. “The pill” is a type of hormone therapy that raises estrogen levels to such dangerous levels that it can cause many complications. I cannot urge you strongly enough to stop using the pill immediately, especially considering that there are many other (safer) ways to prevent pregnancy. My thoughts on taking the pill can be summed up this way: Just say no to birth control pills! Studies show that the risks of taking them, especially long-term, can include: (18)
Eat right for your thyroid. Limit soybeans, raw kale and other raw cruciferous veggies, which might contain thyroid-blocking compounds called goitrogens. I know this sounds confusing. After all, I usually recommend plenty of cruciferous veggies. In this scenario, I am saying it’s okay to eat them…just not raw!   You should limit the kale juice and kale salad. One study in The New England Journal of Medicine looked at a woman who ate two pounds of raw bok choy a day and went into a hypothyroid coma! I know that sounds extreme, but it could happen. I also recommend wild-caught, low-mercury fish and seaweed for additional iodine, the mineral your thyroid hormones are made from. Since people eat less iodized salt, you might be iodine deficient. Over-exposure to fluoride and chlorine also create iodine deficiencies. Pumpkin seeds and oysters provide excellent zinc sources, and Brazil nuts provide selenium and iodine.

Urine testing: A urine hormone test requires that you collect every drop of urine for a 24-hour period. Then your urine is tested to identify each hormone that is present and at what levels on that particular day. This is the most extensive hormone health test because it measures your hormone levels throughout the entire day, instead of the levels for a moment in time, which is the case for blood and saliva tests.

Of course, there is little mid-life women can do to reverse normal physiology and aging ovaries, although they can diligently guard against undue stress that can speed up the process. But growing numbers of younger women are showing signs of estrogen dominance as a result of anovulatory cycles (failure to ovulate) linked to an unbalanced lifestyle: chronic stress, crash diets, exposure to synthetic hormones used in birth control pills, and growth hormones in feedlot beef and dairy products, as well as xenoestrogens found in numerous personal hygiene and household products.
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