Insulin resistance is linked with many health problems, Type II diabetes, being the most commonly known, but it also leads to an increased risk of breast cancer. Insulin is a growth factor and as we eat more and more carbohydrates and sweets, it rises, and as it does it increases IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor) which stimulates cancer cells. A 2004 study out of Vanderbilt University suggests that insulin resistance and increased IGF-1 synergistically increase the risk for breast cancer. The study found that women with abnormal levels of both had a three-fold rise in the incidence of breast cancer. Two years earlier, Dr. Pamela Goodwin of Mt. Sinai Hospital in Toronto found that women with early stage breast cancer, who were also insulin resistant (as defined by a high fasting insulin level) had a higher rate of cancer spreading to other organs (metastases), and death, compared to those whose insulin levels were normal. Type 2 diabetes, which is essentially advanced insulin resistance, leads to breast cancer—the long-running Nurses Health Study of over 100,000 nurses bears this out. Although some studies have questioned these findings, a combined analysis of 21 studies published in 2004, backs up the trend.
Birth control is another dangerous medications that alters hormone levels. “The pill” is a type of hormone therapy that raises estrogen levels to such dangerous levels that it can cause many complications. I cannot urge you strongly enough to stop using the pill immediately, especially considering that there are many other (safer) ways to prevent pregnancy. My thoughts on taking the pill can be summed up this way: Just say no to birth control pills! Studies show that the risks of taking them, especially long-term, can include: (18)

Think of your hormones like chemical messengers of your body. Each hormone sends specific instructions to every organ, making hormones responsible for just about everything your body does – how it works, how it feels, and how healthy it is. Hormones influence your mood, energy level, weight, temperature, digestion, and many other aspects of your health. And yet, we don’t often think about, let alone appreciate, our hormones until they stop working the way we want them to. And when that happens, because of their wide influence, we definitely notice.
Ideally, we could get all of our nutrients from food, properly hydrate from water, and get enough Vitamin D from the sun on a daily basis. We’d get magnesium from the ocean and not get deficient in the first place since we’d be consuming adequate minerals from eating fresh seafood. Since this is rarely the case, supplements can sometimes be needed! I’ve shared the basic supplements that I take before, but certain supplements are especially helpful for hormone balance.

Everyone is tired sometimes. But you should recover with adequate rest, hydration and a healthy diet.  If you feel you are taking care of yourself but are still exhausted or just can’t seem to get back to your best, consider having a comprehensive evaluation of your hormone levels.  Adrenal fatigue and hypothyroidism are more prevalent in our high-paced society than you may think.
Hi. I feel like I’m losing my mind. I’m 43 and until 18 months ago lived a normal,happy, confident life. Due to a couple of bereavements I had a breakdown and all my issues regarding death and aging came flooding out. I’ve been on antidepressants ever since but I seem to be in this cycle of feeling ok then crashing through the floor around ovulation time. I can never feel well for long periods of time. I’m not sure whether I’m pre menopausal or what is going on. I’ve tried so many different therapies (counsellor type stuff) and spent so much money I’m just not sure I can go on like this. I’m not suicidal as I’m terrified of death but I feel totally joyless in my life which is so totally unlike how I was before. Please help if you can. Many thanks.

Many women are affected negatively by hormonal imbalance. To begin explaining why that is, let's settle on a location. Which organ is the culprit? You might have guessed, the ovaries. Really good educated guess, but not entirely correct. We start the story of the nasty effects of hormonal imbalance in women in the brain, yes in the head not down there. For the full story, you can listen to the TEDx talk: "The brain and ovarian hormones".

I would love for you guys to email me and give me some advice! I’ve been on the birth control Lo Loestrin Fe now for about 5 years. After a year of taking this I quit having a period altogether. I haven’t had a period in 4 years!! My OBGYN says its normal on this birth control, but it kind of freaks me out. Also I have been miserable with anxiety, mood swings, and depression over the last few years. I just wonder if this birth control has something to do with it all. I want to know what I would feel like if I quit taking it but it scares me, I also really don’t want to get pregnant right now. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!
Hi… For a while now I’ve been reading about the effects of hormonal imbalance in the physical appearance or physique in general… What I’m really concerned about is my broad shoulder which come off too manly and instead of the feminine shape like a normal girl would have…I ofen get insecure because I cannot wear the clothes I want because my shape seem to be too masculine for the attire (as it appears as an inverted triangle rather than an hour glass)… and just recently I checked with my doctor about my irregular menstruation to where she said that I’m having imbalances in my hormones… having too much estrogen than progesterone… Is it possible that my masculine appearance could be attributed to the said hormonal imbalance???…. and could it be addressed by intake of pills???
A decrease in estrogen levels during a woman's monthly cycle may trigger mood changes in some women. Some females may reach for comfort foods that are high in fat, calories, sugar, and salt in an effort to feel better. Sadly, eating these foods backfires and makes women feel worse. Sodium increases water retention and bloating.. Sugar, excess fat and calories will lead you to pack on the pounds. Falling estrogen levels also affect leptin, a hormone that inhibits hunger. Combat hormonal weight gain by adopting a healthy diet and exercise plan. Stick to lean meats, healthy fats, complex carbs, whole grains, and fresh fruits and vegetables to help prevent PMS and encourage healthy blood sugar levels and weight loss.
Sleep helps keep stress hormones balanced, builds energy and allows the body to recover properly. Excessive stress and poor sleep are linked with higher levels of morning cortisol, decreased immunity, trouble with work performance, and a higher susceptibility to anxiety, weight gain and depression. To maximize hormone function, ideally try to get to bed by 10 p.m. and stick with a regular sleep-wake-cycle as much as possible.
For both genders, too much sugar, refined carbs and alcohol spikes estrogen. Keeping your gut healthy also cultivates healthy sex-hormone metabolism. Too little fiber or too many antibiotics damage the gut, triggering estrogen spikes because your body can’t properly detoxify or excrete waste. Environmental toxins thrive on pesticides called xenoestrogens, because even at lose doses, they act like estrogen in your body.                                              
Food allergies and gut issues: An expanding field of new research shows that your gut health plays a significant role in hormone regulation. If you have leaky gut syndrome or a lack of beneficial probiotic bacteria lining your intestinal wall, you’re more susceptible to hormonal problems, including diabetes and obesity. That’s because inflammation usually stems from your gut and then impacts nearly every aspect of your health. (1b)

Hi – so my last six months since going off birth control has been awful. I was on bc for 10 years. Went off in 2015 and immeditaely got pregnant with my son -had no complications at all. Then After nursing for nine months went back on bc while I lost some weight. In August I went off birth control to try to get pregnant again. At first I had terrible perioral dermatitis, followed by hives every month. Then I got pregnant in October had terrible hives with swelling and ultimately miscarried due to not enough progesterone. My hives resolved with the miscarriage. Then again in December I got terrible hives and anaphylaxis- in Er with epi to stop the swelling. I found out I was very early (2-3 weeks) pregnant but immediately miscarried again and my progesterone was really low again – at 7 days preg pos blood test – progesterone.19; 3 days later .21 (hcg 7). I started bleeding almost immediately and miscarriage again. Since then I have not let myself get pregnant again – but each month I get hives (Not as bad) and perioral dermatitis. I’ve seen functional doctors and my inflammation is terrible – my progesterone at 7 days post ovulation was under .5. My testosterone was also low. And my estrogen is also low – and estridol and estrone ratio is backwards. I may also have PCOS. I have Hashimotos hypothyroidism. I suffer from terrible periods,spotting, pain, headaches and consfipation. I feel that my low hormones are the root of all my problems but don’t know how to fix it. Do you have any suggestions or ideas of what else I could do or what is happening to me?

Hi, I am suffering from hormonal imbalance and my periods are irregular. My doctor advice me two tablets one is a contraceptive(I’m 21 by the way) and he told me I should excersie. But the thing is I get so sad that I just want to cry out loud for hours, I feel so depressed and I get angry or irritated at people around me.Also my lower back hurts a lot everyday.I have acne, hair fall, migraine sometimes, stomach aches everyday, I have gained weight,I go through most of the symptoms listed above. I just don’t know what to do. And the worse thing is I feel as if none understand me or nobody cares what I’m going through. You think I have cysts? Or something bad is wrong with me? Is there a possibility?

These three levels of approaches are not mutually exclusive. A woman may use different approaches at different times or any combination of them, depending on the duration and severity of symptoms. Today, more and more women find that dealing with the symptoms of hormonal imbalance is best accomplished via a combination of healthy lifestyle and alternative treatments.


Everyone is tired sometimes. But you should recover with adequate rest, hydration and a healthy diet.  If you feel you are taking care of yourself but are still exhausted or just can’t seem to get back to your best, consider having a comprehensive evaluation of your hormone levels.  Adrenal fatigue and hypothyroidism are more prevalent in our high-paced society than you may think.

Hormone-regulating supplements. As the name suggests, this variety of herbs doesn't contain any estrogen. They stimulate a woman's hormone production by nourishing the pituitary and endocrine glands, causing them to more efficiently produce natural hormones. This ultimately results in balancing not only estrogen, but also progesterone and testosterone. Hormone-regulating supplements (e.g., Macafem) can be considered the safest way to treat the symptoms of hormonal imbalance naturally, as the body creates its own hormones and doesn't require any outside assistance.
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
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