Because menopause is defined as 12 months or more without a menstrual cycle, it's easy to assume that once you enter the Big M, hormonal activity - including the ups and downs - is pretty much over. For many women this is the case. But because there is always some level of reproductive hormones left in the body, fluctuations and at least some symptoms can continue for years beyond your last period.

For both genders, too much sugar, refined carbs and alcohol spikes estrogen. Keeping your gut healthy also cultivates healthy sex-hormone metabolism. Too little fiber or too many antibiotics damage the gut, triggering estrogen spikes because your body can’t properly detoxify or excrete waste. Environmental toxins thrive on pesticides called xenoestrogens, because even at lose doses, they act like estrogen in your body.                                              
We have no idea which hormone is being released at this moment. They are invisible and work in silence. Unfortunately, we don’t appreciate their diligence to maintain things in homeostasis, and when hormones feel under-appreciated, they become less silent and demand to be visible, they scream for attention.  Hormones move from the unknown to the known. A diabetic, spends her entire life unaware of what her pancreas is doing, unaware of the hormone Insulin, and then upon diagnosis, she has to make sure that her insulin levels are visible to her at all times, otherwise she might go into a coma and even die. It is a similar story with Ovarian hormones too.

If you do all those things but are still not finding relief, Goldstein says a low dose birth control pill might be the answer. The Pill works differently than hormone replacement therapy, which adds more hormones on top of the ones that are already fluctuating, sometimes making the imbalance worse. "The Pill," he says, "shuts down your hormone production completely and gives you a small, even, metered dose that is the same day in and day out. That way, he says, "you don't feel the bumps in the road as much."
The focus here will be on the ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. Even though they are typically called sex hormones, the brain understand them, and often interprets them in consequential ways that have nothing to do with sexuality. For example, the brain has many receptors that interpret and understand the chemical language of estrogen, that is why there are a lot of cognitive changes (memory) and emotional ones (mood) that occurs at menopause after estrogen plummets.  In fact, the body of a seventy-something man makes more than twice as much estrogen as that of a woman the same age. This is because small amounts of testosterone, which the testes produce throughout life, are converted to estrogen. 

I’m struggling with my moods and weight (weight fluctuates a lot) and this seems worse after laparoscopic surgery for endo a couple of months ago. I had a Mirena inserted, but had it removed a couple of weeks after as the side effects were awful. I’ve had horrible pmt for the past 5+years (had endo surgery 20 yrs ago too, and was ok for 10-15yrs) now I seem to get PMT during the middle of my cycle, which has always been fairly regular and not too heavy, but lasts a full 7 days. And also the week before my period. I’d hoped the latest round of surgery, and unsuccessful Mirena, would change things! I take 1-2000mgs of Vit C, SAMe and 5htp daily. Any suggestions on what may help balance me out? I’ve used natural progesterone cream in the past, which did help a bit. Thanks in advance.
Adaptogen herbs are a unique class of healing plants that promote hormone balance and protect the body from a wide variety of diseases, including those caused by excess stress. In addition to boosting immune function and combating stress, research shows that various adapotogens — such as ashwagandha, medicinal mushrooms, rhodiola and holy basil — can:
If you can't sleep or you don't get good quality sleep, hormone balance may be to blame. Progesterone is one compound released by the ovaries that helps you sleep. Low levels may make it difficult to fall and stay asleep. A small study in postmenopausal women found that 300 milligrams of progesterone restored normal sleep when sleep was disturbed. Estrogen levels decrease in perimenopause and after menopause. This may contribute to night sweats and hot flashes, which often disrupt a woman's ability to sleep. See your doctor if you believe an imbalance in hormones is contributing to sleep problems.
Try your best to get a full night's sleep: A Stanford University study found that habitual sleep restriction (five hours a night as opposed to eight) raised a person's ghrelin levels by nearly 15 percent, lowered leptin levels by 15.5 percent, and was directly associated with increased body weight. Other research has shown that exercise and stress reduction may help keep ghrelin levels in check.

A decrease in estrogen levels during a woman's monthly cycle may trigger mood changes in some women. Some females may reach for comfort foods that are high in fat, calories, sugar, and salt in an effort to feel better. Sadly, eating these foods backfires and makes women feel worse. Sodium increases water retention and bloating.. Sugar, excess fat and calories will lead you to pack on the pounds. Falling estrogen levels also affect leptin, a hormone that inhibits hunger. Combat hormonal weight gain by adopting a healthy diet and exercise plan. Stick to lean meats, healthy fats, complex carbs, whole grains, and fresh fruits and vegetables to help prevent PMS and encourage healthy blood sugar levels and weight loss.
Using essential oils for a quick massage or simply diffusing them in your surroundings is another great way to treat a hormonal imbalance. Give yourself a timeline when using essential oils. If you don’t notice that they are helping within 3-4 weeks, discontinue and try another essential oil but don’t use too many at once and don’t use them indefinitely.

The 3% of the body made up of polyunsaturated fats contains both Omega-3 fats and Omega-6 fats in about a 50:50 balance. This ratio is extremely important for health, and it is often ignored. Seed based vegetable oils (like canola oil, soybean oil, etc.) are very high in Omega-6 fats and low in Omega-3 fats. Since the 1950s, these seed based oils have replaced many sources of saturated fats and Omega-3s in the diet. This is one of the reasons that most people are not getting enough vital Omega-3 fatty acids from their diet.


When it comes to menopause symptoms, you don’t just have to suffer through using home remedies like your mother or grandmother did. Effective symptom relief is available in the form of Female hormone imbalance treatment in Philadelphia PA. When your hormones are in balance, your whole body will function better. This means no upsetting symptoms, better health, and better quality of life.

Fatigue, mood instability, weight gain, foggy brain/memory loss, adult acne, hair loss/facial hair, lower sex drive, extreme PMS slide. These symptoms do not just reduce quality of life but they also increase chances of stroke, heart disease, cancer and of course gynecological problems (endometriosis, fibroid, tumors and cysts). There are solutions, don't just acquiesce to lower quality of life. And even if you accept such low standards of functionality, this might amount to truncating your life.  
Are you aware of your medication’s side effects? Some can disrupt your hormone balance, leading to side effects like fatigue, appetite changes, altered sleeping patterns, low libido, sadness and even depression. Some medications that can mess with your hormone balance include corticosteroids, stimulants, statins, dopamine agonists, rexinoids and glucocorticoids. Beware of your medications, talk to your doctor about the side effects and research natural alternatives whenever possible.
In addition, Goldstein recommends that women increase intake of vitamin B6 - either by taking supplements or by adding more beans, nuts, legumes, and fortified bread and cereals to your diet. Northrup suggests increasing levels of zinc (try poultry, seafood, nuts, and whole grains), and magnesium (found in legumes, nuts, whole grains, and vegetables).
Thyroid hormone regulates how fast you burn calories. One in ten women doesn't produce enough of it—a condition known as hypothyroidism, which can lead to weight gain, depression, and fatigue. On the other end of the spectrum is hyperthyroidism, in which the thyroid gland releases too much of its hormone, causing symptoms such as anxiety, a racing heart, excessive sweating, even diarrhea.
One of the first steps in protecting the health of our breasts and preventing breast cancer, is to recognize its hormonal risk factors and begin to reduce them. According to the experts, almost all risk factors associated with breast cancer are directly or indirectly linked to an excess of estrogen, or estrogen that is not sufficiently balanced with progesterone, as is the body’s accustomed way. Also known as estrogen dominance, the condition was defined by John R. Lee, M.D., as an imbalance between estrogen and progesterone in which estrogen levels can become too high relative to inadequate progesterone levels. Dr. Lee also emphasized that estrogen can become dominant whether levels are within normal range, high, or even low, if progesterone levels are even lower, relatively speaking. This is a common condition during perimenopause when hormone levels are fluctuating, and at menopause when ovarian hormone production ceases altogether. A growing number of experts believe that correcting this fundamental imbalance is at the heart of preventing and treating breast cancer.
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