I guess this fact was not known by testosterone scientists who came up with the names estrogen and progesterone. Progesterone means to bear, give birth , the word gestation comes from the same root. estrogen means ‘gadfly’ or ‘frenzy’ , also some trace it to the Greek root (oistros) sexual passion and desire. So, according to these scientists, women are either giving birth or in a state of agitation and hysteria or intense sexual desire. You see this is why we should come up with our own scientific names.  This is also why I prefer to refer to these hormones as Ovarian hormones and not sex hormones, in order to not restrict the vastness of their influences.
Clary sage: Clary sage helps to balance estrogen levels because it contains natural phytoestrogens. It can be used to regulate your menstrual cycle, relieve PMS symptoms, treat infertility and PCOS, and even reduce the chances of uterine and ovarian cancer. It also serves as a natural remedy for emotional imbalances, like depression and anxiety. (13) Diffuse 3-5 drops of clary sage to help balance hormone levels and relieve stress. To ease cramps and pain, massage 5 drops of clary sage with 5 drops of coconut oil into your stomach and any other area of concern.
Hormonal imbalance can occur at any point in your life. It can also be the only state of existence you have ever known. Male hormone imbalance can be brought on by stress, an acute injury or illness, poor nutrition, inadequate exercise and a host of other factors. These glands make up the endocrine system, and they are involved in an intricate balance amongst themselves. Within one gland at one juncture can set things awry throughout the male body with symptoms that are difficult to diagnose. Low testosterone can also set things awry within your body. Just because you have been told your hormones are normal, that does not mean they are optimized.

Not getting enough sleep impacts our long-term brain health, memory, and hormone balance. Getting the ideal 8 hours of sleep per night allows the body to recover properly, detox, and keep hormones like cortisol, melatonin, and leptin balanced.  To maximize hormone function, I recommend getting to sleep from 10pm-6am. Here are more tips to help you optimize your sleep.
If you’ve been diagnosed with a hormone imbalance, it’s critical to get to the root cause of your problem before deciding on a course of treatment. While hormone replacement therapy can help your symptoms, it does not address the underlying cause. Aligned Modern Health takes an approach that believes in getting to the root cause of health concerns, illness and disease, including hormone imbalances.
Hi, I am 62 year old african american femal and have hypothyroidism i take Levothyroxine 1 tablet daily which my doctor said i will be taking for the rest of my life. I have had a partial hystorectomy which means i still have my overies. I have severe hot flashes, trouble getting a good nights sleep because of the hot flashes and have noticed i am getting several dark patchy spots on my body could these spots be the result of hormonal imbalance?
Cells lining the gastrointestinal tract have receptors for both estrogen and progesterone. Levels of these hormones change throughout the course of a woman's monthly menstrual cycle. When they do, they impact the function of the gastrointestinal system. Women often experience abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, and nausea before or during their periods. These symptoms can also occur with many other conditions. If a woman experiences them along with mood changes and fatigue before or during her period, it may be more likely that the GI disturbances are occurring due to monthly hormonal fluctuations.

The use of birth control pills in teenage girls has the potential to raise their risk of breast cancer. It is well established that when girls between the ages of 13 and 18—and to a lesser but still significant degree, up to the age of 21—use birth control pills, their risk of breast cancer can increase by as much as 600 percent. To put it plainly, the earlier a girl begins to use contraceptives, the greater her risk of breast cancer. This may be because the younger the girl, the more undeveloped her breast tissue, and thus the more vulnerable it is to the synthetic hormones contained in the pill. Furthermore, contraceptives work by inhibiting ovulation, which significantly reduces progesterone production and its essential estrogen balancing effects. This is a situation many young women find themselves in: ripe for symptoms of estrogen dominance and vulnerable to long-term risks for breast cancer. (Excerpted from What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Breast Cancer: How Hormone Balance Can Help Save Your Life.)

I am a fairly healthy 22 year old female and I recently got bacterial vaginosis, however I am not sexually active. The fact that there’s no known cause to this vaginal ph imbalance has made my head spin. I was looking deeper into my sleeping habits and I have pretty out of whack sleeping patterns. I sleep at unreasonable hours and usually skimp on hours. Does this cause hormonal imbalances which in result has disrupted my vaginal ph?Or perhaps it’s stress which impairs immune function? I am pretty desperate to know why I would have gotten a bacterial infection. Thanks!


I would love for you guys to email me and give me some advice! I’ve been on the birth control Lo Loestrin Fe now for about 5 years. After a year of taking this I quit having a period altogether. I haven’t had a period in 4 years!! My OBGYN says its normal on this birth control, but it kind of freaks me out. Also I have been miserable with anxiety, mood swings, and depression over the last few years. I just wonder if this birth control has something to do with it all. I want to know what I would feel like if I quit taking it but it scares me, I also really don’t want to get pregnant right now. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!
Jacinta, the birth control pill masks your hormonal problems and only make things worse. More an more women stop with the pill as a mean to balance their hormones AND birth control. More MD’s recognise this too. The ONLY thing to balance your hormones is a lifestyle change. A very good start is our Female Cycle Superpowers. We also learn you there to take other birth control methods which are completely healthy: https://www.healthcoachfx.com/female-cycle-superpowers/
The symptoms of hormone imbalance are vague and often misdiagnosed and ignored. The only way to know is by getting your hormones checked through a blood test. This can be done in-office through saliva testing, blood testing, blood serum testing or urine testing. To get a peripheral idea of if you may be suffering from men's hormonal imbalance, take our online quiz to see if any of the symptoms mentioned seem familiar and how you score on the quiz.
Thank you for this article I have been searching for an answer I am 28 and need help trying to figure out why my OBGYN put me on Metformin because my cycle was too long,had acne,and some facial hair, I do have my tubes tied and is wondering if this is the cause or if it’s my diet but in the future I’m going to untie my tubes and try for another baby, is there any other options besides pills
The good news: There are things you can do. For many the answer lies in natural herbs and supplements, like black cohosh and red clover. Though medical studies remain conflicted over the effectiveness of these remedies, some women report relief. And while HRT was found to have a laundry list of nasty side effects, Goldstein says that for some women, short term use can still be the appropriate answer, particularly for hot flashes.
Hormonal imbalance can occur at any point in your life. It can also be the only state of existence you have ever known. Male hormone imbalance can be brought on by stress, an acute injury or illness, poor nutrition, inadequate exercise and a host of other factors. These glands make up the endocrine system, and they are involved in an intricate balance amongst themselves. Within one gland at one juncture can set things awry throughout the male body with symptoms that are difficult to diagnose. Low testosterone can also set things awry within your body. Just because you have been told your hormones are normal, that does not mean they are optimized.
I am almost desperate for answers. I’ve been on Junel Fe birth control now for 4 years after I had a cyst rupture and they found a small amount of endometriosis. I use to take Buspar for anxiety and it helped me SO much. Well I would feel better, stop taking it on and off and then 6 months ago, my anxiety was SO bad that it put me into a depressive state, which I’ve never felt. Ever since July, my anxiety comes about 2 weeks before me period and it’s super unbearable. No appetite, sleeping too much, no desire to leave my house, just awful. I told my gyno that I wanted off birth control and she said she doesn’t think my birth control has anything to do with it. Before birth control, I always had regular cycles every 28 days but would be super heavy the first 2 days. Since all this anxiety started, I was having crazy thoughts that there’s something wrong with me. I thought I had ovarian cancer and had an ultra sound but turned out to be an ovulating cyst. That’s why I think it’s weird because birth control is suppose to stop ovulation, but why am I? I don’t know what to do. I’m thinking about seeing an endocrinologist but i don’t know if that would help me get some answers.

For many women, night sweats and hot flashes are the first uncomfortable sign that something is amiss. This isn't the time to start hormone replacement therapy, but begin a food journal by jotting down what you eat and drink, how you feel physically, and any emotions that come up after. Many times our emotions are the trigger that increases internal temperature. The next time you feel the flashes coming on, stop and think about the thoughts swirling around in your mind.

Along the same lines, menopause — when a person who menstruates hasn’t had a period for one year — can also be behind hormonal imbalances, Dr. Mary O’Toole, an OB-GYN at Saddleback Medical Center in Laguna Hills, California, tells SheKnows. While the average age for a person to go through menopause is around 51, symptoms may begin as early as 45 or 46, she says.

The food you choose to eat can have a major impact on your health. If your diet is high in sugar, processed carbohydrates, hydrogenated fats, genetically modified foods, and conventional beef, dairy, and poultry, then you are more susceptible to obesity and all the associated diseases, plus an increase in hormonal imbalances.6-11 It's important to maintain a healthy weight, as storing excess fat can lead to hormone imbalances and an increase in stored environmental toxins. Toxins have a negative impact on overall health and should be avoided at all ages of life, especially during pregnancy where the developing baby can carry the negative impact the rest of its life.12-15


I get really weak in the days after my period. My ankles feel like they are being squeezed my upper legs pain me I feel like there is somebody squeezing the side of my head. It’s like I have some kind of fluid retention. The day starts okay and then as the day goes on I just get more and more tired. For the other 2 1/2 weeks in the month I am absolutely fine. I have tried evening primrose Oil and I eat lots of greens. I want to live but during the week after my period I simply don’t have the energy to do it ! Any suggestions I have been to doctors lots of times and they say that there is no physical reason why it is happening and that it is all in my mind. I’m not depressed I’m perfectly happy in the world I want to live but I just can’t And literally have to lie down
The good news: There are things you can do. For many the answer lies in natural herbs and supplements, like black cohosh and red clover. Though medical studies remain conflicted over the effectiveness of these remedies, some women report relief. And while HRT was found to have a laundry list of nasty side effects, Goldstein says that for some women, short term use can still be the appropriate answer, particularly for hot flashes.
At Aligned Modern Health, we work with our patients to find those lifestyle factors that are contributing to their imbalances. This starts with a comprehensive blood analysis, followed by a salivary cortisol test to detect adrenal problems. A complete GI panel and tests for food sensitivities will also help pinpoint the cause of the hormone trouble.

We use a compounding pharmacy: Many doctors only prescribe one form of estrogen because they don’t want to go through the trouble of using a compounding pharmacy that can put two forms of estrogen in the prescription. At Renew Youth, we make the effort to ensure your female hormone imbalance treatment in Springville UT contains both estradiol and estriol for a safer outcome.
A decrease in estrogen levels during a woman's monthly cycle may trigger mood changes in some women. Some females may reach for comfort foods that are high in fat, calories, sugar, and salt in an effort to feel better. Sadly, eating these foods backfires and makes women feel worse. Sodium increases water retention and bloating.. Sugar, excess fat and calories will lead you to pack on the pounds. Falling estrogen levels also affect leptin, a hormone that inhibits hunger. Combat hormonal weight gain by adopting a healthy diet and exercise plan. Stick to lean meats, healthy fats, complex carbs, whole grains, and fresh fruits and vegetables to help prevent PMS and encourage healthy blood sugar levels and weight loss.
If you're concerned about low libido, try incorporating more zinc-rich foods—like oysters and sesame seeds—into your diet (zinc appears to be linked to an increase in testosterone levels), and ask your doctor about testosterone supplementation. To treat PCOS, your doctor might recommend taking birth control pills containing synthetic hormones that reduce the production of testosterone. It's also important to avoid refined sugars and other carbohydrates in your diet (insulin resistance is linked to a boost in testosterone production) and to eat more fiber (which counteracts blood sugar spikes and promotes the excretion of excess sugars from the body).
Are you ready to take the next step towards healing and experiencing optimal health? Search by your city and state or zip code, and we'll provide a list of BioTE Medical providers near you. With thousands of BioTE Medical providers throughout the country, you'll likely have several options for bio-identical hormone replacement therapy providers near you.
I am so tired it’s awful. I am in a stressful situation and I am cold a lot also. I use low dose vaginal progesterone and half a mg. of divigel, I work out and my cortisol is high I think. I try increasing progesterone but get tired on it. Now my breasts are bigger and I am bloated all over. My doctor doesn’t help. I think I have high and low cortisol and I feel like I will never recover from this, help!

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Vitamin D is another important nutrient that is actually a hormone within your body. It not only reduces inflammation and balances your hormones but also boosts your overall immunity (11), (12). To activate supplemental vitamin D or sunshine vitamin D, you require magnesium, and to avoid creating magnesium deficiency, take only 1,000-2,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day. Taking both together will increase your vitamin D levels much more than taking vitamin D alone.
I get really weak in the days after my period. My ankles feel like they are being squeezed my upper legs pain me I feel like there is somebody squeezing the side of my head. It’s like I have some kind of fluid retention. The day starts okay and then as the day goes on I just get more and more tired. For the other 2 1/2 weeks in the month I am absolutely fine. I have tried evening primrose Oil and I eat lots of greens. I want to live but during the week after my period I simply don’t have the energy to do it ! Any suggestions I have been to doctors lots of times and they say that there is no physical reason why it is happening and that it is all in my mind. I’m not depressed I’m perfectly happy in the world I want to live but I just can’t And literally have to lie down
Read on for some of the most common things that can happen when your hormones are not in balance.  Some of these hormonal imbalances can diagnosed by clinical symptoms or after a physical exam; others require simple blood tests. But remember, there could be reasons other than hormones for these conditions, so always check with your health care professional to explore other causes and rule out other problems.   
Vitamin D is another important nutrient that is actually a hormone within your body. It not only reduces inflammation and balances your hormones but also boosts your overall immunity (11), (12). To activate supplemental vitamin D or sunshine vitamin D, you require magnesium, and to avoid creating magnesium deficiency, take only 1,000-2,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day. Taking both together will increase your vitamin D levels much more than taking vitamin D alone.
The natural treatments above can still help you overcome your illness and greatly reduce symptoms, but these recommendations shouldn’t take the place of medical supervision. Because hormone imbalances vary so widely in terms of severity of symptoms, always keep track of how you’re feeling, do your research and evaluate how you respond to different treatments.

“Birth control pills, patches and vaginal rings can help lower testosterone levels and improve excessive hair growth [and] hormonal breakouts,” Lo explains. “Exercise and eating a healthy diet can also help combat insulin resistance associated with PCOS. For women with PCOS who are planning pregnancy, medications such as letrozole or clomiphene citrate may help a woman ovulate.”
Get a lot of natural light during the day, and spend at least 30 minutes outside each day if possible. The wide-spectrum of natural lighting helps boost serotonin levels which balance melatonin levels at night. In fact, my doctor routinely recommends that his patients get 30 minutes of sunlight or bright light within an hour of waking when they are working to balance hormones.
Sandalwood: Sandalwood essential oil can be used to increase your libido, reduce stress, promote relaxation, boost mental clarity and even help you to relax. The powerful fragrance triggers peaceful feelings and results in the overall reduction of stress that can lead to hormone imbalances. Inhale sandalwood directly from the bottle, diffuse it at home or apply 2-3 drops to your wrists and bottoms of the feet.
Although a number of studies over the years have pointed to elevated breast cancer risks among users of synthetic hormone replacement, the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) was the first major clinical trial of its kind to study their impact on bodily health. Results revealed greater risk than benefit among HRT users in terms of heart disease, stroke, and blood clots and a 26% increase in breast cancer risk; the trial was abruptly halted. Naysayers were quick to point out that since only one type of hormone replacement was used in the study—PremPro, a synthetic estrogen and progestin combination that was the number one prescribed HRT for women—the results could not be applied to all forms of HRT use. And that further, the average age of women subjects in the WHI was over 60 so the results could not be representative of most women on HRT. These conclusions were swiftly challenged by the Million Women Study published in the prestigious medical journal, The Lancet, [HRT use and Breast Cancer, Cancer 2003;97:1387–92.] which found that, “use of HRT, by women in the UK over the past decade has resulted in an estimated 20,000 extra breast cancers.” Note to WHI naysayers: The women in this study were between 50 and 64 years of age and a full 15,000 of these cancers were associated with any combination of estrogen-progestin.
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