Insulin is the hormone responsible for maintaining normal blood sugar (glucose) levels in the body. The foods we eat break down into glucose, and insulin’s job is to transport that glucose into the cells that turn it into fuel for energy. Insulin resistance arises when the body is flooded with more sugar than it can handle, and attempts to deliver that glucose to the cells are met with resistance. The syndrome goes hand-in-hand with rising rates of obesity and diabetes. What, you might ask, has this to do with breast cancer? The answer boils down to simple physiology. Excess carbohydrates (especially in refined foods and sugars) that are not needed for energy are stored as fat. Increased body fat increases estrogen levels and increased estrogen levels lead to estrogen dominance, which, as we already know, leads to increased risks for breast cancer.
Our adrenal glands secret several hormones, and one of them is cortisol, your body’s primary stress hormone. Adrenal fatigue happens when there’s an imbalance in this cortisol rhythm: Cortisol is high when it should be low, low when it should be high, or always high or always low. Adrenal fatigue is really a dysfunction of your brain’s communication with your adrenals – not the adrenal glands themselves. Because adrenal fatigue is mainly a brain stress problem, the functional medicine solution focuses on minimizing chronic stressors.
Physical activity is important to hormone balance, not to mention overall health and a good mental state. Exercise helps to keep cortisol levels low and also helps maintain hormone balance by reducing the level of cortisol in the body and sustaining serum insulin levels. Cortisol levels can become significantly high when the body is experiencing stress, either real or imagined.17 Exercise helps counter the effects of stress and regular moderate exercise can lower cortisol levels.18-20 Moderate exercise for 30 to 60 minutes each day can have a profound effect on hormone balance.21-23

"The tell tale with a woman is the monthly cycle," says Alyssa. "If you’ve made real changes, give yourself a cycle to notice if things are improving. It won’t happen all at once but you should find your period doesn't feel quite as draining and heavy. Over a few cycles you should notice more improvements as well as better regularity and predictability.
Eat right for your thyroid. Limit soybeans, raw kale and other raw cruciferous veggies, which might contain thyroid-blocking compounds called goitrogens. I know this sounds confusing. After all, I usually recommend plenty of cruciferous veggies. In this scenario, I am saying it’s okay to eat them…just not raw!   You should limit the kale juice and kale salad. One study in The New England Journal of Medicine looked at a woman who ate two pounds of raw bok choy a day and went into a hypothyroid coma! I know that sounds extreme, but it could happen. I also recommend wild-caught, low-mercury fish and seaweed for additional iodine, the mineral your thyroid hormones are made from. Since people eat less iodized salt, you might be iodine deficient. Over-exposure to fluoride and chlorine also create iodine deficiencies. Pumpkin seeds and oysters provide excellent zinc sources, and Brazil nuts provide selenium and iodine.

Xenoestrogens tend to accumulate in body fat such as breast tissue, and play a dangerous role in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. They mimic the actions of estrogens by barging in and knocking naturally occurring estrogens right off the receptor sites of the cell. They are directly toxic to our DNA and are widely acknowledged to be contributing to the rising rate of breast cancer in western countries. After the 1976 banning of organochlorine pesticide use in Israel, breast cancer rates have come down.

Hello, my name is jessica. Im 17 years old. I am currently on the nexplanon implant for birth control and ive noticed since ive been on it (almost 3 years) ive had so much anxiety and depression. I was wondering if that was due to the birth control and if i get it taken out would my emotions go back to normal because i never had these issues before. Ive been on so many different websites looking for answers and cant get any. Is there a certain amount of time it takes after the birth control is taken out for my emotions to go back to normal?


Using essential oils for a quick massage or simply diffusing them in your surroundings is another great way to treat a hormonal imbalance. Give yourself a timeline when using essential oils. If you don’t notice that they are helping within 3-4 weeks, discontinue and try another essential oil but don’t use too many at once and don’t use them indefinitely.
Could hormonal imbalance cause lightheaded sensation and feeling faint? I’ve been checked out for every other possible cause, but nothing comes back with an answer. My neck and shoulders feel sore and the back of head feels heavy. Had MRI’S, CT scans, all negative. Starting to think its something with the natural chemicals. Suggestions appreciated.

I have been having problem with my period since last year June and it’s really depressing.it all started when I was posted to HIV unit during my IT and seeing those patients make me depressed I couldn’t remove the thought from my head and days later I started getting strange symptoms like shaking of the hands,legs,chronic headache that lasted for days and then d following month my period changes,it really hurts which is also accompany by brown blood instead of red.can someone please help me out.i will appreciate.

Dr. Hotze: Low thyroid and imbalance of the female hormones, but low thy-, that’s a classical finding in hypothyroid patients. Unfortunately, most physicians don’t think about thyroid problems, and if they do, they use a blood test only to make the diagnosis and the blood test is so broad, so wide, so large, that 95% of the people fall within the range, so there’s literally millions of people, I’ve figured 70 million people walking around America today that are hypothyroid …
I have so many of the issues listed. I really want to stop taking my birth control pills. They are combination pills, with a decently high amount of estrogen. The problem is, the last time I tried to quit taking them was three years ago. And that time was hell. 2 months after I stopped I had massive migraines almost daily. They only went away when I started pills back up. I never had migraines at all before that. Now I still get them here and there. I may quit again anyway since I still get migraines.
If you’re experiencing symptoms of menopause, you may be tempted to try a home testing kit. Home testing kits measure follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in your urine. FSH levels increase when you enter menopause, but levels also rise and fall during a normal menstrual cycle. This test can give you an indication of whether menopause has started, but it can’t tell you conclusively.
×