In the meantime, there’s no need to wait on getting started with a diet overhaul. Since high sugar intake along with a highly refined carb/processed food diet are the most common contributors to insulin resistance and hormonal imbalance, making changes to eat “clean” can greatly improve health overall. This includes eating a variety of organic vegetables and fruits, whole grains, low fat dairy products, and lean sources of protein such as fish, suggests Healthline. It is also important to limit caffeine and alcohol consumption, as these can cause cortisol hormones to spike (which can disrupt all other hormone levels).
If you’ve been diagnosed with a hormone imbalance, it’s critical to get to the root cause of your problem before deciding on a course of treatment. While hormone replacement therapy can help your symptoms, it does not address the underlying cause. Aligned Modern Health takes an approach that believes in getting to the root cause of health concerns, illness and disease, including hormone imbalances.
Hi, I am suffering from hormonal imbalance and my periods are irregular. My doctor advice me two tablets one is a contraceptive(I’m 21 by the way) and he told me I should excersie. But the thing is I get so sad that I just want to cry out loud for hours, I feel so depressed and I get angry or irritated at people around me.Also my lower back hurts a lot everyday.I have acne, hair fall, migraine sometimes, stomach aches everyday, I have gained weight,I go through most of the symptoms listed above. I just don’t know what to do. And the worse thing is I feel as if none understand me or nobody cares what I’m going through. You think I have cysts? Or something bad is wrong with me? Is there a possibility?
The content of this website is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any medical condition, nor should it be used as a substitute for medical advice from a qualified physician. The information contained herein is presented in summary form only. It should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a visit, call, consultation or advice from a physician. Only a qualified physician can determine if you qualify for treatment.
Hello! Just thought I’d see what you think about my situation. 3 years ago when I turned 45, I started having menopause symptoms. Found out I had hypothyroid and all my hormones but estrogen were low. I started taking thyroid meds and prometrium 100mg (natural progesterone). I gained 6 pounds the first two weeks! I have been the same weight my whole life before this (115lbs). Since then, I have gained another 15 pounds! No change in diet. I just got my hormones tested last month and now ALL my hormones are at the bottom. I quit taking my progesterone a month and a half ago to see if the weight would start to go away. So far nothing. Two weeks ago, I started taking a new thyroid med, estridiol gel and cut way back on my progesterone to 20-30mg a day. I stopped gaining weight, but how am I going to lose this extra 20 pounds?? I thought progesterone was supposed to help you lose weight? I am super depressed about it. Even if I eat 1000 calories a day and exercise, I can’t lose a pound. It’s going on 3 years of trying to lose this!
First week of July I was diagnosed again of having hemorrhagic cyst on both of my ovaries. That was the only time that an obygene confirmed that im having this so called hormonal imbalance, and it cause me my acne breakout, weight gain, anxiety, sleepless night etc,! I don’t know how to start to fight my condition. I lost my self steam by looking at my face full of acne for a long time now. I have read your article and I was enlightened. I just need someone to push me and tell me it’s not too late I can still do something for my condition. Thanks for your very reliable article. It’s been helpful.
For women, the most pronounced changes come in their 40s and 50s, but can been seen as early as their mid-30s. Many more women are having hormonal symptoms earlier, which has a lot to do with not only our lifestyle and diet, but also the pollution, toxins and xenoestrogens (synthetic chemicals that act as estrogen in our bodies) that we're exposed to every day.
In 1991 The National Institute of Health (NIH) launched the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), the largest clinical trial ever undertaken in the United States. The WHI was designed to provide answers concerning possible benefits and risks associated with use of HRT. This study was canceled in July 2002, after it was proven that synthetic hormones increase risks of ovarian and breast cancer as well as heart disease, blood clots, and strokes. The findings were published in JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association, and to this date have not been disputed.
Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.

Coconut oil contains medium-chain fatty acids that are extremely beneficial for your health and provide building blocks for hormones. These fatty acids help reduce the inflammation within your body that might have occurred due to hormonal imbalance (1). Coconut oil is also great for your overall health as it helps you lose weight by boosting your metabolism and reduces stress and anxiety (2).
Hormones are produced in a complex process, but depend on beneficial fats and cholesterol, so lack of these important dietary factors can cause hormone problems simply because the body doesn’t have the building blocks to make them. Toxins containing chemicals that mimic these building blocks or that mimic the hormones themselves are also problematic because the body can attempt to create hormones using the wrong building blocks. Mutant estrogen anyone?
This insulin imbalance also extends to other women-specific conditions, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which is when reproductive hormones are imbalanced. Per WebMD, the symptoms of PCOS can be mild or worsen in time, and may include acne, weight gain and difficulty losing weight, excess hair on the face and body, irregular periods, fertility problems and depression. Insulin resistance is one of the main physiological imbalances in most, if not all, PCOS, as noted by experts at the Cleveland Clinic.
Because menopause is defined as 12 months or more without a menstrual cycle, it's easy to assume that once you enter the Big M, hormonal activity - including the ups and downs - is pretty much over. For many women this is the case. But because there is always some level of reproductive hormones left in the body, fluctuations and at least some symptoms can continue for years beyond your last period.

Hi… For a while now I’ve been reading about the effects of hormonal imbalance in the physical appearance or physique in general… What I’m really concerned about is my broad shoulder which come off too manly and instead of the feminine shape like a normal girl would have…I ofen get insecure because I cannot wear the clothes I want because my shape seem to be too masculine for the attire (as it appears as an inverted triangle rather than an hour glass)… and just recently I checked with my doctor about my irregular menstruation to where she said that I’m having imbalances in my hormones… having too much estrogen than progesterone… Is it possible that my masculine appearance could be attributed to the said hormonal imbalance???…. and could it be addressed by intake of pills???
Your hormones are produced in the major endocrine glands – your brain (hypothalamus, pineal, and pituitary glands), thyroid, parathyroid, adrenals, pancreas, and reproductive glands (ovaries and testes). Some hormones are also produced in your gastrointestinal tract. With hormones, it’s all about balance. As Goldilocks lamented (and I’m paraphrasing here), there can’t be too much or too little. Hormones have to be just right. Otherwise, a myriad of health issues can happen.
In feb 2016 i gave birth to 2nd child. After that 4 mnthS my cycle is regular but having heavy flow and lasts for almost 10 days.first 3 to 4 days ligbter den 2 to 3 days heavier and 2 to 3 days lighter. Till now i m facing the same. I have also put on pounds. This mnth also my periods come on tym but very light and today is 8th day i m bleeding lighter till now.
In any case, there is much women of all ages can do to rebalance progesterone and overall hormone levels to avoid becoming estrogen dominant. First, we can work with a provider to test our hormone levels for imbalances. If testing reveals estrogen dominance, we can take steps to restore the natural equilibrium by rebalancing with bioidenticals—hormones derived from plant compounds that are made to be identical in structure and function to those our body makes naturally.
Hello! I’m 43 years old.i have an 8yr history with hormonal imbalance.it started with me getting periods every 15days. When I went to the doctor she said I had a cyst in my ovary. Over the years it just kept getting from bad to worse with me getting periods within 15 days to now when I don’t get a period for 3-6months..! Two years ago my doctor decided to put a marena for me and soon after that I started to put on weight and had a total loss of libido. I got it removed after 4 months. So now I have weight that I gained since the marena which is around my belly and mentally I feel like I’m going crazy most of the time! Very extreme emotions of sadness,depression etc
Replace the right thyroid hormones. Most doctors will only prescribe T4 (such as Synthroid), the inactive form of thyroid hormone your body must convert to its active form T3. Most people do better on bioidentical hormones (like Armour, Westhroid or Nature Throid) or a combination of T4 and T3. A Functional Medicine doctor who understands how to optimize thyroid balance can customize a nutrient protocol.

Could hormonal imbalance cause lightheaded sensation and feeling faint? I’ve been checked out for every other possible cause, but nothing comes back with an answer. My neck and shoulders feel sore and the back of head feels heavy. Had MRI’S, CT scans, all negative. Starting to think its something with the natural chemicals. Suggestions appreciated.


Once a day now compared to four times. A day) it lasts quite a while and is exhausting and painful) I’m a disabled vet , my insurance is limited to the VA and they are not helping me. It has taken them two years now to finally be willing to address the weight issues which resulted from the hormonal imbalances as a result perhaps of menopause however as a result of the extreme weight gains the bottom of my lungs collapsed, I have now become diabetic and I have horribly high cholesterol as well as they have found something wrong with my right ventricle in my heart. What I’m saying is .. my body just can’t take this weight. I need help and I needed it yesterday the struggle is real the depression getting out of control and the reason for my disability within the military is because of spinal cord Injuries and 21 ruptured /slipped discs. You read that right I have two left. So yes, my body hurts under the pressure of this weight. I would so appreciate any help you could offer. I have recently gained another ten lbs making it a whopping 70 lb gain and btw I’m on a sugar
I am so glad I have found this website. I think my hormones have been a bit off since college (10 years ago) but I started with a bad depression about 6-7 years ago then after I had my first child (3 years ago) everything changed. I started to get stiff while I was pregnant towards the end. After I had him I couldn’t focus and felt foggy. I continued with stiffness, night sweats, irritability, moodiness, depression, and basically all of the symtoms of estrogen dominance. After my second child the concentration and memory got a lot worse. I have been seeing holistic doctors for about 3 years now and they go back and forth with chronic infections. All of my symtoms get worse around my cycle so I felt it had to be hormonal. I finally got a hormone test and all of them were generally low, but progesterone was really low and estrogen on the low side of normal. Pregnenolone was virtually absent. My cortisol was low as well. My three biggest symptoms are depression/anxiety, brain fog/ADD symptoms, and blood sugar imbalance. Oh and I have acne at 30 like I’m 15 again 🙁 I feel like I have tried quite a few detoxes and resets but I can’t eat the way I’m supposed to because I feel shaky and jittery the whole time, which then throws my mood off. Can a reproductive endocrinologist help with this? I am willing to try anything lifestyle and diet, but I’m hesitant because I feel like nothing has worked yet. Anyone in a similar boat? Thanks

Yes, there are lifestyle, diet and physical activity components to maintaining a healthy weight, but that isn't the end of the story. Many women have underlying hormonal imbalances that make it difficult to maintain a healthy weight. Unaddressed or emerging insulin resistance is one of the most common; small changes in diet — such as eliminating processed foods, sugars and wheat — are steps in the right direction.
I am almost desperate for answers. I’ve been on Junel Fe birth control now for 4 years after I had a cyst rupture and they found a small amount of endometriosis. I use to take Buspar for anxiety and it helped me SO much. Well I would feel better, stop taking it on and off and then 6 months ago, my anxiety was SO bad that it put me into a depressive state, which I’ve never felt. Ever since July, my anxiety comes about 2 weeks before me period and it’s super unbearable. No appetite, sleeping too much, no desire to leave my house, just awful. I told my gyno that I wanted off birth control and she said she doesn’t think my birth control has anything to do with it. Before birth control, I always had regular cycles every 28 days but would be super heavy the first 2 days. Since all this anxiety started, I was having crazy thoughts that there’s something wrong with me. I thought I had ovarian cancer and had an ultra sound but turned out to be an ovulating cyst. That’s why I think it’s weird because birth control is suppose to stop ovulation, but why am I? I don’t know what to do. I’m thinking about seeing an endocrinologist but i don’t know if that would help me get some answers.
Therefore we encourage you to take our 5-minutes quiz first. Over 36.000 women took this quiz before you. It will teach you a lot about your hormonal imbalances. Your hormones dictate virtually every part of your life: from your state of mind to your behavior, body shape, eating habits and even your reaction to stress. You can only live a happy and healthy life if your hormones are balanced.
Since I had a total thyroidectomy almost a yr ago my libido and breast have been dropping like crazy, I’m having night sweats, anxiety, puffy eyes, stress, confusion, lack of sleep, lack of energy, major hair loss, I’m getting very irritable very fast, depressed and worry a lot over nothing. I think its a hormonal issue because I never had the majority of these problems in my life till after the TT especially the the first ones, no libido and no breasts, could this be a hormonal issue/problem or am I losing it???

The food you choose to eat can have a major impact on your health. If your diet is high in sugar, processed carbohydrates, hydrogenated fats, genetically modified foods, and conventional beef, dairy, and poultry, then you are more susceptible to obesity and all the associated diseases, plus an increase in hormonal imbalances.6-11 It's important to maintain a healthy weight, as storing excess fat can lead to hormone imbalances and an increase in stored environmental toxins. Toxins have a negative impact on overall health and should be avoided at all ages of life, especially during pregnancy where the developing baby can carry the negative impact the rest of its life.12-15
This primary level of treatment involves the least amount of risk, though conversely it requires the highest amount of self-discipline. Many times some simple changes in lifestyle can reap huge benefits in fighting symptoms caused by hormonal imbalance, and achieving a higher overall level of health. Fundamentally, techniques for stress reduction, such as yoga or meditation, combined with regular exercise and an improved diet, can do a woman great service. Diet in particular is key.

Dr. Hotze: Low thyroid and imbalance of the female hormones, but low thy-, that’s a classical finding in hypothyroid patients. Unfortunately, most physicians don’t think about thyroid problems, and if they do, they use a blood test only to make the diagnosis and the blood test is so broad, so wide, so large, that 95% of the people fall within the range, so there’s literally millions of people, I’ve figured 70 million people walking around America today that are hypothyroid …
A variety of things may trigger headaches, but a decrease in estrogen levels is a common cause in women. If headaches occur routinely at the same time every month, just prior to or during a period, declining estrogen may be the trigger. If hormonal headaches are particularly bad, a doctor may prescribe birth control pills to keep estrogen levels more stable throughout the cycle. Try over-the-counter pain relievers to ease headache pain. If you need something stronger, a doctor may prescribe a triptan or other medication to treat and prevent headaches. Eating right, exercising, avoiding stress, and getting adequate sleep will help you minimize PMS symptoms and headaches.
Interventions at the third level involve the highest risk and often the highest costs. The most common drug therapy for treating mood swings in the U.S. is HRT. This may be a quick and intense way to combat the underlying hormonal imbalance; unfortunately, it entails serious side effects and increases the risk of different types of cancer among women, as the following study has proven.
For women, the most pronounced changes come in their 40s and 50s, but can been seen as early as their mid-30s. Many more women are having hormonal symptoms earlier, which has a lot to do with not only our lifestyle and diet, but also the pollution, toxins and xenoestrogens (synthetic chemicals that act as estrogen in our bodies) that we're exposed to every day.

In feb 2016 i gave birth to 2nd child. After that 4 mnthS my cycle is regular but having heavy flow and lasts for almost 10 days.first 3 to 4 days ligbter den 2 to 3 days heavier and 2 to 3 days lighter. Till now i m facing the same. I have also put on pounds. This mnth also my periods come on tym but very light and today is 8th day i m bleeding lighter till now.
At your appointment with Aligned Modern Health, our goal will be to get to the root cause of your symptoms to provide a good roadmap for treatment. First, your doctor will thoroughly review your health history, including a look at your family history, to rule out other health conditions that might be causing your symptoms. Be prepared to be candid at this appointment, as this will help your doctor get a more accurate diagnosis.

Urine testing: A urine hormone test requires that you collect every drop of urine for a 24-hour period. Then your urine is tested to identify each hormone that is present and at what levels on that particular day. This is the most extensive hormone health test because it measures your hormone levels throughout the entire day, instead of the levels for a moment in time, which is the case for blood and saliva tests.

It’s not “all in your head”.  Neuroendocrinology is the study of the intimate relationship of the neurotransmitters, or chemical messengers of the brain, and hormones.  Excess adrenal stimulation due to the outrageous stress that we subject ourselves to has become a silent epidemic.  Cortisol and norepinephrine, produced and released by the adrenal glands, often underlie the feelings that you may perceive as anxiety.

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