Hormones are the chemical messengers of the body that are responsible for controlling many major processes like metabolism and reproduction. They are produced by the endocrine glands. The three major categories are thyroid, adrenals, and sex hormones, and they all work together. When one of these glands produces too much or too little of hormones, it leads to a hormonal imbalance in the body as the other glands have to pitch in, which puts a strain on them and can lead to more imbalance.
Our clients are never expected to take our advice on faith alone. We are happy to explain the science behind our female hormone imbalance treatment in Philadelphia PA, complete with references to relevant research. We’ve been studying the science of healthy female aging since 1999, and in that time we’ve developed the following protocols to maximize the effects of our treatments while also preserving our clients’ health:
It’s not “all in your head”.  Neuroendocrinology is the study of the intimate relationship of the neurotransmitters, or chemical messengers of the brain, and hormones.  Excess adrenal stimulation due to the outrageous stress that we subject ourselves to has become a silent epidemic.  Cortisol and norepinephrine, produced and released by the adrenal glands, often underlie the feelings that you may perceive as anxiety.
You might never know this from conventional medicine, which seems to subscribe to the idea that women are destined to suffer throughout their reproductive life. Women suffer from mood and behavior swings resulting from the three P’s: Puberty, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and peri-menopause (the years leading up to and just after their final period), or the three M’s:  menstrual cramps, menopause and mental anxiety!
HIIT does not just help you burn those extra pounds, but it also helps in strengthening your heart and lungs and increasing the production of human growth hormone (HGH). However, if you are sweating copious amounts, be aware that you are also sweating out your minerals. As noted above, minerals are very important for keeping your hormones balanced. Keep yourself hydrated using sea salted water. Drink half your body weight (measured in pounds) in ounces of water. To every quart of drinking water add ¼ teaspoon of unrefined sea salt.

Hi, I am suffering from hormonal imbalance and my periods are irregular. My doctor advice me two tablets one is a contraceptive(I’m 21 by the way) and he told me I should excersie. But the thing is I get so sad that I just want to cry out loud for hours, I feel so depressed and I get angry or irritated at people around me.Also my lower back hurts a lot everyday.I have acne, hair fall, migraine sometimes, stomach aches everyday, I have gained weight,I go through most of the symptoms listed above. I just don’t know what to do. And the worse thing is I feel as if none understand me or nobody cares what I’m going through. You think I have cysts? Or something bad is wrong with me? Is there a possibility?

Hormonal imbalance may be to blame for some cases of mood disturbance. Many women experience anger, irritability, mood swings, depression, and anxiety before and during their periods. These can be associated with premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a more severe form of PMS. Women who have PMS or PMDD appear to be more sensitive to changing hormone levels. Estrogen has an effect on neurotransmitters including dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine. Not smoking or drinking alcohol can help with these symptoms. Steer clear of caffeine, sugar, and sodium. Get plenty of exercise, enough sleep, and get adequate calcium. Some women may benefit from taking birth control pills or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Talk therapy may be beneficial, too.


Magnesium– Magnesium is vital for hundreds of functions within the human body and many of us are deficient in this master mineral (here’s how to tell if you are). There are several different ways to get Magnesium: In powder form with a product like Natural Calm so that you can vary your dose and work up slowly, ionic liquid form can be added to food and drinks and dose can be worked up slowly,or transdermal form by using Magnesium oil applied to the skin (this is my favorite method). Topical application is often the most effective option for those with a damaged digestive tract or severe deficiency.
TCM practitioners believe that the emotions of fear cause disease in your reproductive organs, kidneys and adrenals, affecting cortisol levels. This can lead to serious conditions like PCOS and infertility. The emotions of frustration, impatience and un-forgiveness cause disease in your liver, which can lead to an estrogen imbalance. And emotions of worry and anxiety can cause issues with your insulin levels, which can then affect several hormones. (11)
"The tell tale with a woman is the monthly cycle," says Alyssa. "If you’ve made real changes, give yourself a cycle to notice if things are improving. It won’t happen all at once but you should find your period doesn't feel quite as draining and heavy. Over a few cycles you should notice more improvements as well as better regularity and predictability.

Though it used to be in vogue to prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to treat this fundamental imbalance, persistent links to breast and ovarian cancer, heart disease, and blood clots have caused most healthcare professionals to rethink this drastic option. Many agree that the most effective approach is to combine a few changes in lifestyle with alternative treatment options.

The above symptoms of hormonal imbalance in women can indicate any one of the conditions of menopause and her ugly sisters (perimenopause and postmenopause), surgical menopause, thyroid health and adrenal fatigue. But regardless of condition, these symptoms could mean that you have a hormone imbalance. If you are experiencing these symptoms, getting tested by a highly trained bioidentical hormone doctor in order to discover the current levels of your hormones, could be the solution you have been seeking. Once we know your results, we can find that beautiful melody and relieve you of premenopause symptoms and menopausal symptoms; you do not have to live with them! You will be healthier, happier, and free to enjoy your life without the inconvenience and frustration of symptoms resulting from premenopause, menopause, or any of the others.
Breast cancer is a major concern for women of all ages. As we have discussed, excess estrogens may act as initiators of cancer or as promoters of cancer cell growth. There are concerns too about a surplus of estrogen metabolites such as estrone sulphate, the stored form of estrogen in the body, contributing to the overall estrogen burden and the growth of breast tumors. However, not all hormones are equivalent when it comes to breast cancer risk. Estriol, the weakest estrogen may have a protective effect against breast cancer. If we follow natural physiology, and the growing number of studies attesting to its protective benefits, bioidentical vs. synthetic progestin may also help to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer via its balancing effects on estrogen.
The endocrine system is the system of the endocrine glands in the body. The endocrine system chemically controls the various functions of cells, tissues, and organs through the secretion of hormones. The endocrine system includes the adrenal glands, parathyroid gland, pituitary gland, and thyroid gland, as well as the ovaries, pancreas, and testes.
Hello, my name is jessica. Im 17 years old. I am currently on the nexplanon implant for birth control and ive noticed since ive been on it (almost 3 years) ive had so much anxiety and depression. I was wondering if that was due to the birth control and if i get it taken out would my emotions go back to normal because i never had these issues before. Ive been on so many different websites looking for answers and cant get any. Is there a certain amount of time it takes after the birth control is taken out for my emotions to go back to normal?
Hormonal imbalances can occur in men and women of almost any age.1 A variety of factors can be related to these imbalances, including high insulin levels from diets high in refined foods and sugar, exposure to environmental toxins (xenoestrogens), high consumption of hydrogenated fats, and lack of physical activity leading to weight gain.2-5 Age is also a factor in reduced levels of hormones, creating feelings of imbalance in everyday pursuits. For example, testosterone levels in women begin going down after age 20. By age 40 a woman's testosterone level will be half of what it was when she was 20 years old. This is why getting hormone levels checked even while in your 20's may be necessary if you aren't feeling yourself. For women between the ages of 40–60, testosterone levels can remain pretty constant. After menopause testosterone declines once again.1
Most women have menstrual cycles that last between 21 and 35 days. Up to one quarter of women experience irregular periods. This includes having periods that are shorter or longer than usual or periods that are lighter or heavier than usual. Some women who have irregular periods may experience abdominal cramping or a lack of ovulation. Amenorrhea is a medical term that refers to the an absence of periods for at least 3 months even though a woman is not pregnant. Menorrhagia is a disorder that causes excessive menstrual bleeding. Dysmenorrhea causes pain and cramping during periods. Prolonged menstrual bleeding involves periods in which bleeding routinely lasts for 8 days or longer. Oligomenorrhea is a condition in which periods occur infrequently or more than every 35 days. See your doctor if you believe hormonal imbalance is affecting your menstrual cycle.
Though it used to be in vogue to prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to treat this fundamental imbalance, persistent links to breast and ovarian cancer, heart disease, and blood clots have caused most healthcare professionals to rethink this drastic option. Many agree that the most effective approach is to combine a few changes in lifestyle with alternative treatment options.
I have read that because the Mirena delivers progesterone to the uterus only, this can cause the body to stop producing it elsewhere, and actually cause progesterone deficiency. I have also read that blood tests only show an incomplete snapshot reading of hormone levels. However, my gp assumes I have adequate progesterone and low estrogen, and has prescribed estradiol. I’m too scared to take it, as my symptoms seem more akin to estrogen dominance.
Despite potential drawbacks, there are some cases in which hormone replacement and medications are helpful and even necessary for women whose symptoms are unmanageable. Occasionally, despite lifestyle therapies – diet, exercise, stress reduction, nutrient supplementation, and herbs – hormone therapy can be lifesaving (as well as mood- and brain-saving).
Bone broth: Bone broth soothes the digestive system and supplies the body with nutrients that can be easily absorbed. Consuming bone broth or protein powder made from bone broth is especially beneficial to your health because it contains healing compounds like collagen, proline, glycine and glutamine, which have the powder to boost your overall health.
I guess this fact was not known by testosterone scientists who came up with the names estrogen and progesterone. Progesterone means to bear, give birth , the word gestation comes from the same root. estrogen means ‘gadfly’ or ‘frenzy’ , also some trace it to the Greek root (oistros) sexual passion and desire. So, according to these scientists, women are either giving birth or in a state of agitation and hysteria or intense sexual desire. You see this is why we should come up with our own scientific names.  This is also why I prefer to refer to these hormones as Ovarian hormones and not sex hormones, in order to not restrict the vastness of their influences.
In the years preceding menopause, a woman may suffer from decreased testosterone as her ovaries and adrenal glands slow the production of sex hormones. This may explain why many women experience a drop in libido during this period of their lives. Excess testosterone, however, may be the result of a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); possible symptoms include irregular periods, male-pattern baldness, a deepening voice, and excess body hair.
Because menopause is defined as 12 months or more without a menstrual cycle, it's easy to assume that once you enter the Big M, hormonal activity - including the ups and downs - is pretty much over. For many women this is the case. But because there is always some level of reproductive hormones left in the body, fluctuations and at least some symptoms can continue for years beyond your last period.

Your gut is lined with tiny cells called receptors that respond to estrogen and progesterone. When these hormones are higher or lower than usual, you might notice changes in how you're digesting food. That’s why diarrhea, stomach pain, bloating, and nausea can crop up or get worse before and during your period. If you’re having digestive woes as well as issues like acne and fatigue, your hormone levels might be off.
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