Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.
Why is it that so many people struggle with weight fluctuations?  Why is the scale so merciless folks are starving themselves and working so hard?  It’s because they are starving themselves and working so hard.  The body experiences these challenges as stress.  And when the body is stressed, it produces more cortisol.  Cortisol tells your body to hang on to that fat because it’s a great storage form of energy.
Maca– A hormone boosting tuber in the radish family with a long history of use in Peru. Women who use this often see improvements in fertility, reduction in PMS and better skin/hair. It can help men with sperm production, testosterone levels and muscle composition. Maca is a good source of minerals and essential fatty acids, which is one of the ways it supports hormone balance. It is available in powder form (least expensive option) or in capsules. Maca should be discontinued during pregnancy.
You might consider doing my Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet, which will naturally help reset your hormones by eliminating sugary, processed foods and food sensitivities while focusing on organic, whole, unprocessed foods. To reset female hormones, focus on specific hormone-balancing foods. Increase certain foods like flaxseeds, cruciferous veggies, good fats, and traditional organic non-GMO whole soy foods (tofu, tempeh, miso, natto, and edamame). Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of ground flaxseeds a day to your diet.
Feeling bloated, irritable, or just not your best? A hormone imbalance could be to blame. Hormones are chemical “messengers” that impact the way your cells and organs function. It’s normal for your levels to shift at different times of your life, such as before and during your period or a pregnancy, or during menopause. But some medications and health issues can cause them to go up or down, too.
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