“Brain fog” is a common complaint even though this is not a true medical term. It is a commonly reported symptom with many potential underlying causes. Women in perimenopause and after menopause report more memory complaints and difficulty concentrating than premenopausal women. Declining estrogen levels may be to blame, but other factors may play a role. Perimenopausal and post-menopausal women often have trouble sleeping and experience hot flashes and increased depression. These, in turn, may contribute to brain fog. Thyroid disease is another common cause of brain fog. See your doctor if you are experiencing brain fog so you can find out and treat the root cause. If declining estrogen levels are to blame, hormone replacement therapy may offer some relief and restore hormonal balance.
When too stressed out, the adrenal gland borrows raw material to make Cortisol, the notorious stress hormone. It borrows it from Progesterone.  This leads to lower levels of progesterone. This is one way stress interferes with getting pregnant and leads to infertility in women.  Furthermore, lower levels of progesterone are associated with more severe PMS symptoms, and mood instability. Not only that but, it causes estrogen/progesterone imbalance. Which can cause many gynecological problems.  Such factors may lead to long cycles. I know some of you were told that it is ok to have long cycles, but research says it might lead to breast cancer. Progesterone has just revealed its nasty side, because you insulted your adrenal gland.
I have so many of the issues listed. I really want to stop taking my birth control pills. They are combination pills, with a decently high amount of estrogen. The problem is, the last time I tried to quit taking them was three years ago. And that time was hell. 2 months after I stopped I had massive migraines almost daily. They only went away when I started pills back up. I never had migraines at all before that. Now I still get them here and there. I may quit again anyway since I still get migraines.
Thyroid hormone regulates how fast you burn calories. One in ten women doesn't produce enough of it—a condition known as hypothyroidism, which can lead to weight gain, depression, and fatigue. On the other end of the spectrum is hyperthyroidism, in which the thyroid gland releases too much of its hormone, causing symptoms such as anxiety, a racing heart, excessive sweating, even diarrhea.
This pre-diabetic metabolic syndrome is marked by this resistance to insulin meaning your body is producing insulin but the insulin is not doing what it should, i.e., shuttling blood sugar into your cells where you can use it. Instead, this ineffective insulin, through a cascade of reactions, results in excessive fat storage, making weight loss seem impossible.
Hormone balance is deeply connected to the food we eat, the exercise we get, the toxins we absorb, the weight we carry, and the stress levels we put up with. How these multiple factors impact the overall hormone picture is crucial, particularly at midlife when most hormone production is taken over by the adrenal glands. If stress takes center stage in our lives and becomes chronic, cortisol floods the system and total hormone production lags. This forces the body to steal from its own supplies of available progesterone, to make more cortisol, thus depleting this key balancing hormone with obvious implications for estrogen dominance. Prolonged stress tears up our bones, melts our muscles, robs us of strength and energy, lowers our libido and overwhelms our immunities, putting us at serious risk for chronic illness and autoimmune disease.
Progesterone is a hormone commonly prescribed for women with too much estrogen relative to the level of progesterone produced by the body. Progesterone minimizes the stimulating effects of estrogen on coronary arteries, and when given alone or combined with estrogen, it may improve bone mineral density. Progesterone improves sleep, may increase libido, acts as a diuretic, lowers blood pressure, and improves the insulin-glucose balance to facilitate blood glucose control.
Replace the right thyroid hormones. Most doctors will only prescribe T4 (such as Synthroid), the inactive form of thyroid hormone your body must convert to its active form T3. Most people do better on bioidentical hormones (like Armour, Westhroid or Nature Throid) or a combination of T4 and T3. A Functional Medicine doctor who understands how to optimize thyroid balance can customize a nutrient protocol.

The information provided on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem. You should not stop taking any medication without first consulting your physician.
Vitamin D is another important nutrient that is actually a hormone within your body. It not only reduces inflammation and balances your hormones but also boosts your overall immunity (11), (12). To activate supplemental vitamin D or sunshine vitamin D, you require magnesium, and to avoid creating magnesium deficiency, take only 1,000-2,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day. Taking both together will increase your vitamin D levels much more than taking vitamin D alone.
Simply put, PMS, menopausal symptoms, and other problems are all signs of imbalances in your sex hormones. They are not the result of mutant genes that destroy our sexual vitality as we age. Instead, they are treatable symptoms of underlying imbalance in one of the core systems in your body. Get your sex hormones back in balance, and these problems will usually disappear.
Menopause doesn't have to mean the end of your sex life. If you experience dryness and discomfort during vaginal penetration, the North American Menopause Society suggests that you use a water-based vaginal lubricant or a vaginal moisturizer. Last but not least, regular sexual activity and stimulation can promote blood flow to the genitals ??? in this case, there is some truth to the phrase, "Use it or lose it."

I am a fairly healthy 22 year old female and I recently got bacterial vaginosis, however I am not sexually active. The fact that there’s no known cause to this vaginal ph imbalance has made my head spin. I was looking deeper into my sleeping habits and I have pretty out of whack sleeping patterns. I sleep at unreasonable hours and usually skimp on hours. Does this cause hormonal imbalances which in result has disrupted my vaginal ph?Or perhaps it’s stress which impairs immune function? I am pretty desperate to know why I would have gotten a bacterial infection. Thanks!
Northrup also advocates increasing your intake of omega-3 fatty acids (found in flax seed, walnuts, and eggs) as well as increasing calcium. When it comes to diet, Northrup is a strong believer in the power of a low glycemic eating plan, which shuns simple carbohydrates like bread, pasta, and pastry in favor of complex carbs like fruits and veggies plus protein and fiber.
Wendy: No other answers. They said next year to come in for my checkup and I said, “I’m still not feeling well,” and they just said that was normal. There was nothing they could do for me. Finally I asked the doctor, I said, “Well, can you please run some tests just to make sure?” I said, “Something’s not right. I don’t feel well at all,” so he ran some tests and sure enough, my hormones were not balanced, so he put me on counterfeit hormones, which for a while helped and I didn’t realize that it’s kind of like a band-aid for the symptoms. It doesn’t really replenish any of the hormones that my body was needing, so for a few years I did okay, then I’d start saying, “I still don’t feel well,” so he’d put me on different ones.

First off, thanks for this article. That part at the end made me tear up, I’m sort of having a bad moment. I ran across this because I searched google “if my hormones are imbalanced will it age me” long story short.. family history of endometriosis and hormone issues related to diet. . I follow a strict lifestyle of no meat, absolutely no preservatives, I go back and forth with allowing fish and dairy into my life when I’m feeling particularly gaunt.. I drink water or plain almond milk. I basically avoid refined sugars or anything processed at all. Anyway, my Ob/gyn who specializes in fertility and hormones started me on this charting thing to track my cycles and ovulation in order to begin me on a regimen of the “bio-identical” hormones. After doing a hormone panel at peak+3,5,7,9 he saw that my estrogen and progesterone dropped very low, so he prescribed estradiol and progesterone. I ended up refusing to take these because I don’t like to mess with my natural chemistry and I’m so anti- anything unnatural. But tonight looking at my face which seems to be aging, my disrupted sleep pattern and some minor depression.. I thought, could these pills help? Am I doing myself a disservice by NOT taking them? Most importantly at that moment, is it AGING me not to take them? Lol. Silly I know. If you could offer some advice I would heed it after reading what you’ve said. Thanks and thanks again, 🙂
Typically, when ghosts become visible, it is always scary news. When we become aware of hormonal imbalance, when we finally catch on and feel that something is off, hormones as commanded by the brain have already made us feel vulnerable, weak, anxious, sad, dulled our memories, debilitated our thinking process, truncated our life and dissolved our relationships- sounds familiar?
This insulin imbalance also extends to other women-specific conditions, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which is when reproductive hormones are imbalanced. Per WebMD, the symptoms of PCOS can be mild or worsen in time, and may include acne, weight gain and difficulty losing weight, excess hair on the face and body, irregular periods, fertility problems and depression. Insulin resistance is one of the main physiological imbalances in most, if not all, PCOS, as noted by experts at the Cleveland Clinic.
And like the price of gold, hormones fluctuate.  It's normal for hormone levels to shift from time to time.  Think about the time before and after your period, as well as pregnancy and menopause. But sometimes, they get out of balance, throwing your body out of whack.  Even a small shift can cause big problems.  The ebb and flow of hormones can be the cause of weight gain or loss, mood highs or lows, and many other functions of your cells and organs like your kidneys, muscles and heart. 

The certified practitioners in the BioTE Medical network are trained in advanced hormone replacement therapy. Frequently men reach for coffee, a pharmaceutical medication or one of those “little blue pills” that ignore the cause of their struggles. If you are tired of being sick and tired, consider solving your problems once and for all by seeking BHRT hormone therapy pellets from BioTE Medical. With thousands of practitioners throughout the United States, it is likely that you will be able to choose from several providers near you. Click here to start your journey! The goal in doing so is that not only will you better understand these hormone imbalance symptoms but be able to tackle them head on!
Making lifestyle changes is easier said than done, especially if one is accustomed to a certain routine. In addition, while these changes will help alleviate many symptoms, they do not address the problem directly at the hormonal source and further treatment may be necessary. Alternative medicine has proven to be excellent for treatment of hormonal imbalance in a safe and natural way.
Obesity leads to the reduction of SHBG (sex hormone binding globulin) a protein that binds estrogen levels and keeps them out of circulation. When these levels go down, estrogen levels go up, become active, and thus stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells. Over one hundred studies have investigated the links between obesity and breast cancer. Taken as a whole, their findings strongly indicate that overweight or obese women have a 30 to 50% great risk of postmenopausal breast cancer than leaner women. It is known that women who continuously gain weight throughout life have a higher risk of breast cancer.
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