In feb 2016 i gave birth to 2nd child. After that 4 mnthS my cycle is regular but having heavy flow and lasts for almost 10 days.first 3 to 4 days ligbter den 2 to 3 days heavier and 2 to 3 days lighter. Till now i m facing the same. I have also put on pounds. This mnth also my periods come on tym but very light and today is 8th day i m bleeding lighter till now.
I am 35 years old and for the past 2-months have had a somewhat irregular cycle. In May my period came twice, and 3-weeks later was back in June. Although I have experienced anxiety in the past, I was have always been able to get myself out of it with cognitive behavioral skills. This time around, I have anxiety, but it’s not consistent. I go from one day feeling normal and optimistic, to feeling dread the next. I also notice a week prior to my period I get more of the dread fear emotions, and during my period I’m fine. Then the anxiety comes back during ovulation for a day or two and then it’s back to feeling normal again. A day or two prior to my period, I lose sleep and get very hot and anxious at night. Yes life has been stressful the past months and simply thought that was the case, “I broke”, but starting to think it’s hormonal. I had been on Mirena for 5 years and last year was pregnant. I’ve been birth control free for 10 months after giving birth. Would love the advise!
Gelatin or Collagen- a great source of minerals and necessary amino acids. Gelatin and collagen powders support hormone production and digestive health in various ways. Gelatin powder can actually “gel” and is useful in recipes like homemade jello and probiotic marshmallows, while collagen protein does not gel but is easily added to soups, smoothies, coffee, tea or any other food. (I get both gelatin powder and collagen peptides from here)

So, a brain structure called the Hypothalamus controls hormonal secretions from the ovaries and all other glands in the body. It does that by intimate connections with the pituitary gland (the master gland), FYI we are still in the brain. Then the pituitary sends chemical messages broadcasted in the bloodstream to the various glands including the ovaries, thyroid and our stress gland-the adrenal.
Hi, I’m a 33 year old who has been suffering from hormonal imbalance since my teenage years. I was then diagnosed with endometriosis in April 2016 after having done a laporoscopy. My gynae prescribed that I take Vissanne for 6 months which I did. After a few months of taking it I went on menopause and he explained to me that was the intention. At first I was uncomfortable with the idea until he explained that I don’t really need to go on my period. This way, I save my good eggs for when I’m ready to have a child. I haven’t had any children yet.
Imbalances in your hormones are triggered by bad food. If you eat sugar, you’ll produce more insulin, more estrogen, and more testosterone. Any type of flour and sugar can lead to these imbalances.  Dairy and gluten are often triggers for inflammation and hormonal imbalances. Xenobiotics or environmental chemicals like pesticides in our food can act like powerful hormone disruptors and trigger our own hormones to go out of balance. If you are interested to know how these toxins disrupt our hormones then read Our Stolen Future by Theo Colburn.
Read on for some of the most common things that can happen when your hormones are not in balance.  Some of these hormonal imbalances can diagnosed by clinical symptoms or after a physical exam; others require simple blood tests. But remember, there could be reasons other than hormones for these conditions, so always check with your health care professional to explore other causes and rule out other problems.   
Hi my name is Lorraine i am seeing a naturopath for weight loss because i am finding extremely difficult to loss weight. I have done a saliva test and it came back that my oestrogen levels are at 55 and my progesterone is low testosterone is low cortisol goes the opposite way it increases at night. Im taking o clear calcium d glucarate but it not decreasing.
Hi,am 21 i have abnormal period some time i get it in 2 weeks some times in 3,i have tired to use birth control pill but after i used it for 3 month i stoped,while i was on the pill everything is right no pain no abnormality nor acne.but right after i stoped using it i got this big painfull bumps that literally mess up my face.it’s been 2 month since i stoped using birth control pill and now am trying to work out and stable my hormones naturally but to be honest it hasn’t been goin well for me.my breats hurts so much i have black marks on my face am usually dipressed and dont want to leave home,since i knew about my unbalanced hormones i didn’t almost everything i can but its not effective as it’s written in every book or online pages I’ve read,can u tell me what i should do to balance my hormones? Please help me
The certified practitioners in the BioTE Medical network are trained in advanced hormone replacement therapy. Frequently men reach for coffee, a pharmaceutical medication or one of those “little blue pills” that ignore the cause of their struggles. If you are tired of being sick and tired, consider solving your problems once and for all by seeking BHRT hormone therapy pellets from BioTE Medical. With thousands of practitioners throughout the United States, it is likely that you will be able to choose from several providers near you. Click here to start your journey! The goal in doing so is that not only will you better understand these hormone imbalance symptoms but be able to tackle them head on!

Estrogen plays a huge role in ensuring healthy cell growth in every part of the body. When estrogen levels begin to decline during menopause, cell renewal slows and women start to feel old and uncomfortable. By seeking female hormone imbalance treatment in Springville UT, you can reverse this process and enjoy many important health benefits, such as:


Strength training is your best friend when trying to boost testosterone! Magnesium is also a true testosterone booster. So make sure to eat plenty of dark leafy greens (spinach, swiss chard, kale, watercress and collard greens), pumpkin seeds, fish (mackerel, pollock, turbot and tuna are excellent!), avocado, unroasted nuts (Brasil, almonds, cashews, pecans and walnuts), bananas, and dark chocolate.
This web site offers health, wellness, fitness and nutritional information and is provided for informational purposes only. This information is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for, nor does it replace, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, Always speak with your physician or other healthcare professional before taking any medication or nutritional, herbal or homeopathic supplement, or using any treatment for a health problem. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, contact your health care provider promptly. Do not disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking professional advice because of something you have read on this web site. The use of any information provided on this web site is solely at your own risk. Nothing stated or posted on this web site or available through any services offered by Dr. Jolene Brighten, ND and Brighten Wellness, LLC, are intended to be, and must not be taken to be, the practice of medicine. Information provided on this web site DOES NOT create a doctor-patient relationship between you and any doctor affiliated with our web site. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

For women, the most pronounced changes come in their 40s and 50s, but can been seen as early as their mid-30s. Many more women are having hormonal symptoms earlier, which has a lot to do with not only our lifestyle and diet, but also the pollution, toxins and xenoestrogens (synthetic chemicals that act as estrogen in our bodies) that we're exposed to every day.


If you’ve been diagnosed with a hormone imbalance, it’s critical to get to the root cause of your problem before deciding on a course of treatment. While hormone replacement therapy can help your symptoms, it does not address the underlying cause. Aligned Modern Health takes an approach that believes in getting to the root cause of health concerns, illness and disease, including hormone imbalances.
In addition, Goldstein recommends that women increase intake of vitamin B6 - either by taking supplements or by adding more beans, nuts, legumes, and fortified bread and cereals to your diet. Northrup suggests increasing levels of zinc (try poultry, seafood, nuts, and whole grains), and magnesium (found in legumes, nuts, whole grains, and vegetables).
The natural treatments above can still help you overcome your illness and greatly reduce symptoms, but these recommendations shouldn’t take the place of medical supervision. Because hormone imbalances vary so widely in terms of severity of symptoms, always keep track of how you’re feeling, do your research and evaluate how you respond to different treatments.
If you suspect that you might suffer from hormonal imbalance, the first step is to consult with a medical doctor. It is possible that your lab results are within the normal range but you still have many of the above symptoms, some of the tests are not sensitive enough to pick up on all indications of imbalance.  This just means that your journey to find alternative treatments will be a long one, but very much worth it.

Here’s a rule of thumb: Steer clear from oils high in omega-6 fats (safflower, sunflower, corn, cottonseed, canola, soybean and peanut), and load up on rich sources of natural omega-3s instead (wild fish, flaxseed, chia seeds, walnuts and grass-fed animal products). I also want to mention that there is a type of omega-6 fat that you want to get in your diet called GLA. GLA (gamma-linoleic acid) can be taken in supplement form by using evening primrose oil or borage oil, and it’s also found in hemp seeds. Studies show supplementing with GLA can support healthy progesterone levels. (4)


Hi I have been suffering with skin allergies/ rashes and have noiticed they become worst when I’m due for my period, then they disappear when my period has stopped? I am currently pregnant and the rash has got worst and hasn’t gone away? Iim thinking it has something to do with my hormones?? can I do anything safely to help while I’m pregnant and balance out my hormones?
Hormones are the chemical messengers of the body that are responsible for controlling many major processes like metabolism and reproduction. They are produced by the endocrine glands. The three major categories are thyroid, adrenals, and sex hormones, and they all work together. When one of these glands produces too much or too little of hormones, it leads to a hormonal imbalance in the body as the other glands have to pitch in, which puts a strain on them and can lead to more imbalance.

Maca– A hormone boosting tuber in the radish family with a long history of use in Peru. Women who use this often see improvements in fertility, reduction in PMS and better skin/hair. It can help men with sperm production, testosterone levels and muscle composition. Maca is a good source of minerals and essential fatty acids, which is one of the ways it supports hormone balance. It is available in powder form (least expensive option) or in capsules. Maca should be discontinued during pregnancy.


For many women, night sweats and hot flashes are the first uncomfortable sign that something is amiss. This isn't the time to start hormone replacement therapy, but begin a food journal by jotting down what you eat and drink, how you feel physically, and any emotions that come up after. Many times our emotions are the trigger that increases internal temperature. The next time you feel the flashes coming on, stop and think about the thoughts swirling around in your mind.

Most people tend to associate sugar as merely a precursor to weight gain, but its effects go way beyond the threat to the waistline. For women especially, a diet full of excessive sugar – which includes all refined carbohydrates, not just the sweet stuff – can lead to significant hormonal imbalance. One of the most notable effects of too much sugar is insulin resistance, according to the Cleveland Clinic.
A combination of approaches is usually the most effective route to take. Lifestyle changes combined with alternative medicine will most likely be the best way to alleviate the symptoms of this hormonal imbalance. However, for some women the symptoms will be so severe that a more drastic treatment is necessary. In taking the leap into pharmaceutical options, side effects are inevitable, yet sometimes they can be worth it if the benefits will outweigh the risks.
In any case, there is much women of all ages can do to rebalance progesterone and overall hormone levels to avoid becoming estrogen dominant. First, we can work with a provider to test our hormone levels for imbalances. If testing reveals estrogen dominance, we can take steps to restore the natural equilibrium by rebalancing with bioidenticals—hormones derived from plant compounds that are made to be identical in structure and function to those our body makes naturally.
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