Green tea helps with estrogen metabolism, which is critical when dealing with estrogen dominance and lowered estrogen levels are associated with fewer incidences of cancer, especially breast cancer.  In one study, Japanese women who drank green tea daily had up to 40% urinary estrogen levels as compared to women who drank green tea only once per week.(4)
I’ve had ALOT of these symptoms. I’m not having my periods. And when and if I do its just very light spotting. I’m constantly having PMs symptoms..ive had it going on almost a month now. I’ve had pap smears..cbc blood work..uti checks..pap smears and they can’t find anything wrong..though I feel so tired and like I’m in a fog ALL THE TIME! I cramp but no period..im by NO means pregnant. My hands constantly stay cracked and dried and I couldn’t figure out why..my back and face and sometimes chest break out..i have gains weight to the point its noticeable! Only difference is..i have NO appetite..im not even eating! Nothing sounds good to me and I don’t have the urge to eat. I do take one a day women vitamins daily..but due to all of this it affects my work ethic at work and my parenting of my 15 month old little girl. I started noticing changes about seven months ago and about a month ago these symptoms has took over my body! I’m constantly irritable or always wanting to cry for no reason! not like depression but just over small things or nothing! Any ideas?! Could it be this?!

Just found this site and it’s very interesting. I am 32 and have total alopecia, asthma and excema. I started a progeaterone only pill last year and noticed considerable difference in my whole life. I noticed alot of hair growth on my body that I haven’t had since I was five years old. I also suffer from brittle nails and at times quite severe cracks on my heels. I stopped the pill for a few months and the hair that had grown in fell out again, so I went to my GP and asked to be put bak on pill for six months and after six weeks I’m noticing tiny improvements in hair growth. I suffer with fatigue, weight gain and mood swings. I’d love to hear your opinion on this please. Thank you 


Because estrogen and progesterone receptor sites are very similar at the cellular level, estrogen receptor sites can ?wake up? when occupied by progesterone molecules, enhancing the action of estrogen for a short period of time. It is easy to draw the conclusion that this is a sign the body is responding well to the progesterone, and sufferers are encouraged to ?brave through? this estrogenic effect, as it is supposed to eventually go away. However, ignoring the underlying dysfunction when alerted by the body is a recipe for disaster.
Thanks for the information.  I have all of the above frustrating symptoms except for infertility as we’ve completed our family.  I have recently started taking Chasteberry, Estrogen Blockers and an Adrenal SAP based on the recommendations from my ND.  She indicates that it will likely be a few months before I notice any results and reminds me to be patient and focus on the positive.  Like most people, finding the balance of full-time family, full-time work, life and self-care is incredibly challenging.  I’m wondering if you have any suggestions for facial skin care?  a year after I stopped breast-feeding my daughter i developed acne around my chin/jawline and have tiny red bumps all over my forehead which never seem to come to a head, they are just small red bumps.  Any tips that you can provide for facial regime would be great.  Thanks very much for this information.
Often the first step to maintaining balance of hormones is to address one’s lifestyle and make appropriate changes. Exercising regularly and eating healthily, along with stress-reducing practices such as meditation and yoga, can help to not only reduce symptoms associated with high progesterone levels, but also improve overall health and well-being. Some studies suggest that symptoms pertaining to the imbalance of progesterone can be lessened by eating foods that work to promote a stable level of estrogen within the body, such as soy, cherries, potatoes, wheat, rice, alfalfa, apples and yams.
Some women respond to even very low doses of progesterone with symptoms of excess.  This is not so much an excess susceptibility as an indication that these women's endogenous production is adequate to provide for their needs.  In practice, the range of progesterone tolerance can be quite narrow, and a tiny dose is all that is needed to complete the balance between the estrogens and progesterone.
Wow there sure is some confusion out there. I had a complete thyroidectomy at 45 years old after nodules were found after my last pregnancy at 43 years. Since then I have lost over half my hair and my joints ache so bad I crawl around on my hands and knees for the first hour after I get out of bed. The doctor looks at me like I am insane and prescribes antidepressants or narcotics!! I want neither. I think its low progesterone as I am bloated, suffer insomnia due to the excruciating joint pain, irregular periods, dry skin, can’t concentrate or retain anything.. and my FSH comes back that my hormone levels show no sign of menopause. I don’t get it.. but I need the pain to stop and the energy level to deal with a seven year old! Help
Progesterone is a hormone found in men, women and children. Everyone needs a small amount of progesterone for good health and longevity. Women of reproductive age need (and produce) the most. Progesterone plays an essential role in a woman's reproductive cycle and her ability to have children, and if she does not produce enough and has low progesterone many serious problems can occur.
The Women Living Naturally website suggests that xenohormones may contribute to estrogen dominance and low progesterone. Xenohormones are man-made synthetic substances that have hormone-like effects. The Natural Hormones website suggests that exposure to synthetic substances, like plastics, may increase estrogen levels and stimulate a lower progesterone levels. Plastics contain xenohormones, which mimic estrogenic activity and create hormone imbalance. Pesticides, herbicides and fungicides that derive from petrochemicals may also contain xenohormones. Solvents and adhesives like fingernail polish and cleaning supplies may contain xenohormones, as well as automobile exhaust and PCBs.
Most commonly, a patient will be given a ten-day course of progesterone. When she stops taking the supplement, the lack of progesterone triggers a “reboot” in her system and her normal period will begin. In certain situations—women with a history of depression, diabetes, or abnormal cholesterol—a lower dose or a shorter time frame may be prescribed. Dr. Hjort calls this treatment “a kind of trickery to keep the uterus calm and the cycle short and regular.” It’s possible to see “a 20 to 30 percent reduction in length of flow, heaviness of flow, and massive improvement of regularity in women who have irregular cycles,” she says.
Vitex (Chaste Tree Berry) is one of the most powerful herbs for women’s fertility and menstrual health. There are numerous studies and testimonials of Vitex and its effects on the body. One of the reasons Vitex is so effective and popular is because of its ability to balance hormones while not containing hormones itself. Vitex supports hormonal balance in the body by having an effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis (hormonal feedback loop), correcting the problem at the source.
In order to assure that this test is done at the correct time in your cycle you need to first confirm ovulation. Taking your basal body temperature each morning before you get out of bed is the most accurate measure of ovulation (second to having a daily ultrasound of your ovaries). Once you see a sustained increase in your waking temperatures you have confirmed ovulation. You can then arrange to have your progesterone test done on the 7th day after your temperature went up.
Hi! I HV been dealing with low progesterone levels for many years and it gives new challenges after every few months. I m dealing with infertility treatments for about ten years and still no success. However the main concern is I don’t get my periods unless I take progesterone so i take it in every cycle from day 16 to 25 and it was working OK. But now the scene is that from last few cycles my cycle prolonged to 9 days. Still I was not complaining but now in this cycle I got no blood only a few tiny drops and a few threads and thats all. Plz guide me what can I do to help it.
Dr. Hjort notes that when progesterone seems to work, it’s possible that the patient was going to sustain the pregnancy anyway. Because there is solid research on both sides of the debate, she believes there is something science hasn’t figured out yet, and progesterone just happens to help with whatever underlying condition(s) there may be. It could well be that the progesterone truly solves the problem; but the science isn’t yet certain of what that “problem” is.
Yes, I do use vitex and depending on your levels and how old you are there are a few ways to use it. If you are perimenpausal or menopausal you can use 1 full dropperful of tincture 2 times a day. If you are younger and cycling regularly and have estrogen dominance issues take 1 dropperful 2 times a day from ovulation through day 28. Then get you cycle and do not start again until ovulation. You can use capsules in place of tincture but I like the tincture because you can adjust dosages more easily to find that perfect dose. Hope this helps.
Green tea helps with estrogen metabolism, which is critical when dealing with estrogen dominance and lowered estrogen levels are associated with fewer incidences of cancer, especially breast cancer.  In one study, Japanese women who drank green tea daily had up to 40% urinary estrogen levels as compared to women who drank green tea only once per week.(4)
Progesterone’s a very important hormone, and as I mentioned, it begins to decline in mid-life around the age of 30, 35, 40, in that range. As a matter of fact, as women march through their menstrual life, they will have anovulatory cycles. An means not ovulating. Every month, there will be some months as women move into their 40s and towards menopause, they won’t ovulate at all. They don’t make any progesterone. That’s why they get…sometimes women will say, “Sometimes I’ll get a very heavy period and it will last maybe eight or ten days and then the next month it will be shorter and I don’t know what’s going on.” Well, one month she ovulated and one month she didn’t. One month when she ovulated, she made progesterone to balance the estrogen. The other she didn’t.

I have every single symptom above and have been trying to deal with these symptoms for a year and a half. My doctor refers me to my gynecologist who says it is depression/anxiety. I have tried multiple different antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications because the second half of my cycle I turn into a crazy monster (PMS/PMDD). I had my tubes clipper 7 years ago after having my son because my husband at the time did not want more kids. We are no longer married and I am now married to a wonderful man and we would like to have another child. He has been amazing trying to help me deal with all of this and find solutions. I am going to hopefully being having my clips removed in the next few months but before doing that my doctor wanted me to do several tests. The nurse called me today and said my progesterone level is low and she wants me to go on Clomid for cycle. I want to know if going on Clomid will help my levels OR if I should ask my dr to put me on Progesterone. I really need some advice because this has been super difficult trying to deal with. 
@Kelsey, Well, when you’re low in estrogen, you’re normally low in progesterone as well – which is why they probably have a lot of the same symptoms. And I tend to think you may be on to something with the adrenal issues since hormone production stems there. Weight should also be considered – if you don’t weigh enough, you may not have enough estrogen.
infertility treatment  |  female infertility  |  male infertility  |  ovulatory dysfunction  |  endometriosis  |  unexplained infertility  |  repeated losses miscarriages  |  advanced age infertility  |  ivf  |  gender selection  |  iui  |  icsi  |  ivm  |  pgd  |  egg donation  |  INFERTILITYIHR © 2011  |  Privacy policy  |  Sitemap  |  SEO Sitemap  |  Busimed, Inc.
We are exposed to more xenoestrogens (chemicals that mimic estrogen) in our environment and in our foods than we have ever have in the past. These xenoestrogens cause your body to perceive higher estrogen levels in our systems and the relative progesterone levels pale in comparison. We are exposed to xenoestrogens in plastics, synthetic hormones, and animal products.
It is such a relief to finally know what I’m dealing with. I also was having fatigue, weight gain, palpitations and extreme brain fog. My PA that I go to  specializes in caring for midlife issues in women and she is a Godsend!  I would recommend finding a physician for those that are having these issues. It is so worth it. Thank you for your website and sharing the information. 
Often the first step to maintaining balance of hormones is to address one’s lifestyle and make appropriate changes. Exercising regularly and eating healthily, along with stress-reducing practices such as meditation and yoga, can help to not only reduce symptoms associated with high progesterone levels, but also improve overall health and well-being. Some studies suggest that symptoms pertaining to the imbalance of progesterone can be lessened by eating foods that work to promote a stable level of estrogen within the body, such as soy, cherries, potatoes, wheat, rice, alfalfa, apples and yams.

Kirstin Hendrickson is a writer, teacher, coach, athlete and author of the textbook "Chemistry In The World." She's been teaching and writing about health, wellness and nutrition for more than 10 years. She has a Bachelor of Science in zoology, a Bachelor of Science in psychology, a Master of Science in chemistry and a doctoral degree in bioorganic chemistry.
When we have too much progesterone we feel bloated, can have hot flashes, get more anxious or depressed, can have difficulty sleeping and get an increased appetite. These symtpoms can arise with overtly high progesterone (i.e. from topical use) or from a relatively high progesterone during the second half (luteal phase) of your period in relation to estrogen. Remember again that it’s all about balance.
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 I am 42 years old. I have always had regular uncomplicated periods. But in the last 2 years I have started having migraines, spotting two or three days before my actual period starts. Extreme mood swings, anything from severe heavy bleeding with clots to barely spotting.  It can range from two days to last month was 10 days! Hot flashes, sweats, insomnia, foggy thinking and forgetfulness.  My GP doesn’t want to check hormone levels doesn’t think that is it. Oh and also started with ezema on hands and continuously split as well as heels on my feet. Any help would be more than appreciated! 
Hi Dee, I am on this page reading about progesterone, but when I read your post I wanted to make a comment. I hope you see it. Please check out Stop the Thyroid Madness and Thyroid Change for help!! The slurred speech might be caused by poor thyroid functioning! Did your doctor do a complete thyroid panel? For us thyroid patients, we know a COMPLETE panel is necessary. (TSH, T4, T3, and anti bodies.) I would get a second opinion on that thyroid test. Call it a hunch, but I bet you are a fellow low thyroid sufferer. Good luck!
[Figure 51-5, p. 682 from the NaPro textbook. Cumulative pregnancy rate of patients with endometriosis treated with NaProTECHNOLOGY compared to conservative surgery only. Patients with normospermic husbands only (From: Pope Paul VI Institute research, 2004 and Rock JA, Guzick DS, Sengos C, et al: The Conservative Surgical Treatment of Endometriosis: Evaluation of Pregnancy Success with Respect to the Extent of Disease as Categorized Using Contemporary Classification Systems. Fertil Steril 35:131-137, 1981).]

I had a question regarding Progesterone drops.  i am currently seeing a natural hollistic provider specifically  for infertility.  My periods are like clockwork, I am ovulating, but unfortunately had a miscarriage two months ago at 6 weeks.  The reason was unknown.  I am going to have my hormone levels checked, but wanted to ask you a question regarding the natural progesterone drops.  My friend gave me some to try for Pms symptoms.  Well, I had some cramping and brain fog on the 3rd day of my period so I decided to take 10 drops of progesterone mixed with my water.  After the fact I am now reading this can stop ovulation from happening?   Is this true?  I hope not, as I only used it the one day during my period.  We are TTC, and am worried I could have thrown things off.  I appreciate your response!!
The ‘pill’ is often prescribed as the solution to reproductive disorders, yet it’s designed to attach the drug progestin (not progesterone) to the progesterone receptors to block the uptake of progesterone thus preventing ovulation. The problem is if we don’t ovulate we don’t produce progesterone. Balanced progesterone levels are essential for a healthy reproductive system.
I’m sure you guessed I would say this – but I suggest a thorough work-up from a naturopathic physician. These lab values are only one part of the story. There are many herbal and supplemental therapies that can support you and assist in getting your hormones back on track. Further, your ND will assess your adrenal function, antioxidant status, etc. Warmly, Dr Julie
I was actually diagnosed as infertile due to a lack of ovulation…. which I decided on my own was wrong. I’m an herbalist, so I’ve spent the past 7 years intensively studying the herbs used for hormonal balance both because I so desperately wanted to have children… and I think ultimately I was meant to share my journey. At any rate, what I found out on my own once away from the doctors was that I had a progesterone deficiency… I suspect this is a hormonal imbalance that can start in the womb, so it might be interesting to take a look at your mom and grandma if you still can. A big tip off for me, besides the short luteal phase was the brown discharge that occurred in my monthly flow. Ironically, I always thought that was normal because my mother had always had it as well. It’s a big sign that your progesterone is not sufficient to fully flush your uterine lining the month before and your womb is just constantly trying to get rid of left over blood each succeeding month. My mom also had a number of miscarriages and I was the only pregnancy to go full term. What’s great about this little symptom is that as I achieved balance, I could very clearly see a different cycle- one that was red from end to end. After a couple years working with the herbs (and a whole foods diet of course) I had my first child… and then I got pregnant by surprise about 18months afterwards! I believe I can see some symptoms of my chronic low levels returning- though my cycle remains red… so I’m going to have to start back into my routine.
infertility treatment  |  female infertility  |  male infertility  |  ovulatory dysfunction  |  endometriosis  |  unexplained infertility  |  repeated losses miscarriages  |  advanced age infertility  |  ivf  |  gender selection  |  iui  |  icsi  |  ivm  |  pgd  |  egg donation  |  INFERTILITYIHR © 2011  |  Privacy policy  |  Sitemap  |  SEO Sitemap  |  Busimed, Inc.
Thanks for the great article! I had some postpartum issues after my first baby (mainly anxiety). My son is now a year and a half and I’ve been struggling with irregular periods since his birth. My functional medicine dr put me on bioidentical progesterone cream but my levels are still not very high. I will be regular for months and then have two periods within the same month. I take the cream throughout the entire month. I also take vitex and holy basil. Any other suggestions or thoughts? I’ve thought too about only taking the cream after ovulation and until my period but not sure! I’m 29 and prior to pregnancy never had any issues with my periods. Thanks in advance!
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Progesterone is triggered during ovulation – about 14/15 days after your first day of bleeding and begins to drop as estrogen rises during the beginning of your cycle. (Read more about understanding your menstrual cycle here) Progesterone’s job is to maintain the lining of the uterus, which makes it possible for a fertilized egg to attach if you’re trying to get pregnant. It also helps maintain healthy cervical mucous, which provides nourishment and safe travels for the sperm as it moves toward the egg.
Postmenopausal women and children tend to have the lowest progesterone level and often have a progesterone deficiency. Adult males have a similar progesterone level to that in women during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle. When a woman ovulates, the level of progesterone in her blood more than doubles. During pregnancy, her progesterone level goes up by one to two hundred times.

Progesterone is a key hormone for women’s health, having a great influence on your mood, sleep, period flow, bloating, weight and more. It is also important as the hormone that balances out our estrogen levels. Low progesterone can be associated with PMS, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, infertility, early miscarriage, PCOS, heavy periods and perimenopause. It is also associated with the development of breast cancer because of its role in counterbalancing estrogen.
Progesterone is made from the cells that surrounded the egg during its development. They are called granulosa cells. The cells make up the wall of the cyst that contains the egg. This type of cyst is called a follicle. As the egg develops, the follicle grows and the granulosa cells increase in size and number. Before ovulation (release of the egg), these cells produce mostly estrogen. After ovulation, they still produce some estrogen but a lot more progesterone. After ovulation, the follicle cyst is called a corpus luteum cyst.
In discussing anecdotal evidence in which progesterone seems to work, doctors who reject progesterone supplements may point to the idea that women with recurrent miscarriages tend to have a high success rate even without treatment—so in an uncontrolled setting, it is just as likely that a woman supplemented with progesterone would have had a successful pregnancy even without treatment.
Because of the lack of evidence for improved pregnancy outcomes, the ASRM Practice Committee Opinion does not advise luteal phase hormone therapy with HCG or progesterone unless you are undergoing an assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedure, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). Pituitary suppression drugs used during ART cycles can interfere with corpus luteum function and progesterone production. In this situation, treatment increases pregnancy rates and reduces miscarriages.
The correct levels of progesterone must also be in the right balance with estrogen to regulate your menstrual cycle. Abnormally high levels of progesterone can be caused by abnormalities in your menstrual cycle, dysfunction with your adrenal glands, or being under too much stress. Some of the warning signs that your progesterone levels are constantly too high are fatigue, difficulty losing weight, and decreased sex drive.
Side Effects of Progesterone in Pregnancy Exercise Effects on Progesterone What to Do If Progesterone Is Low During Early Pregnancy? The Effects of Progesterone on the Fetus Does Low Progesterone Cause No Pregnancy Signs? Signs and Symptoms of a Low Progesterone Level Symptoms of High Progesterone Are There Natural Ways to Increase Progesterone Levels? Can Certain Foods Naturally Increase Progesterone? How Diet Affects Progesterone During Pregnancy Progesterone & Beer Effects of Progesterone on the Uterine Lining The Effects of Progesterone on Endometriosis How to Use Progesterone Cream for Fertility What Causes Women to Have Low Progesterone? Is Prometrium a Natural Progesterone? What Causes Depression During Menstruation? What Are the Side Effects With Progesterone Withdrawal? Natural Progesterone & Bloating Progesterone Levels & Clomid Treatment for Infertility
Hormone balance is deeply connected to the food we eat, the exercise we get, the toxins we absorb, the weight we carry, and the stress levels we put up with. How these multiple factors impact the overall hormone picture is crucial, particularly at midlife when most hormone production is taken over by the adrenal glands. If stress takes center stage in our lives and becomes chronic, cortisol floods the system and total hormone production lags. This forces the body to steal from its own supplies of available progesterone, to make more cortisol, thus depleting this key balancing hormone with obvious implications for estrogen dominance. Prolonged stress tears up our bones, melts our muscles, robs us of strength and energy, lowers our libido and overwhelms our immunities, putting us at serious risk for chronic illness and autoimmune disease.
Progesterone is one of the major female hormones produces by the ovaries. The other hormone is estrogen and the two hormones work together to control a woman’s menstrual cycle. Doctors often prescribe progesterone as hormone replacement therapy for menopausal women. Progesterone is available in pill form, as a topical gel, as a vaginal insert or as an oil. Due to the way the body uses and produces hormones, it may be difficult to have a one-time overdose of progesterone. Prolonged use can cause several side effects.
One mysterious effect in the progesterone intolerant women is bladder problems.  Some women have either a great increase in urinary tract infections or a feeling like they are having an infection as soon as they try taking a "normal" progesterone dose.  If bladder symptoms start and stop with starting and stopping progesterone, they may be related.
You can become estrogen dominant if progesterone levels fall too low – yet you can also experience symptoms of low progesterone if estrogen levels become too high. Phytoestrogens in the diet, birth control pills, inflammation, and a sedentary lifestyle are a few of the many ways to cause unnaturally high estrogen levels. Check out this post on estrogen dominance for more.

Women who suffer from PMS are often familiar with the depressive consequence of low progesterone. Upon studying the nature of PMS, researchers discovered that not only was progesterone too low during the last 10 days before menstruation, but so was the neurotransmitter serotonin, otherwise known as the happy hormone. Serotonin is also the precursor for our sleep hormone melatonin, suggesting low progesterone is involved in insomnia.
The ‘pill’ is often prescribed as the solution to reproductive disorders, yet it’s designed to attach the drug progestin (not progesterone) to the progesterone receptors to block the uptake of progesterone thus preventing ovulation. The problem is if we don’t ovulate we don’t produce progesterone. Balanced progesterone levels are essential for a healthy reproductive system.

A: Hormone replacements, such as Prometrium (progesterone) can be useful during menopause to relieve symptoms of hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and sleep disturbances, but there are risks that come with them. Studies have shown an increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease, and stroke when using female hormones. Prometrium 200 mg has been approved by the FDA and is usually given as a single dose at bedtime for 12 days sequentially per 28-day cycle, to postmenopausal women with a uterus who are also taking estrogen tablets. In other cases, 400 mg is given nightly for 10 days. It is given to prevent estrogen from thickening the lining of the uterus, which could result in a higher risk for uterine cancer. Common side effects may include headache, breast tenderness or pain, upset stomach, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, tiredness, muscle, joint, or bone pain, mood swings, irritability, excessive worrying, runny nose, sneezing, cough, vaginal discharge, and problem urinating. Hormone replacement therapy is not meant to be taken on a permanent basis. After the symptoms of menopause are gone, the hormones should be stopped, due the their risks. Some women do not experience symptoms of menopause, and if you do not have problems with symptoms, you probably do not need to be taking the hormones. Factors that influence menopause and how long it will last include genetics, lifestyle, diet, stress, general health, and cultural perspective. Some symptoms, such as vaginal dryness and urinary symptoms, may persist into postmenopause, but most diminish and disappear within 12 months of the last period. After that, your doctor may decide to discontinue the hormone treatment. For more specific information, consult with your doctor or pharmacist for guidance based on your health status and current medications, particularly before taking any action. Patti Brown, PharmD


I love this info and the podcast! My estrogen levels are normal and progesterone tested at 2 during luteal phase so my doctor put me on a low dose of bioidentical progesterone, and it’s really helped with PMS and libido and I’ve even started losing a little weight BUT I started having panic attacks and super high anxiety, which is not at all normal for me. I have Hashimotos but have normal thyroid levels and eat AIP. Any thoughts or suggestions would be super appreciated!!!
Unfortunately, for most this honeymoon does not last indefinitely. While some people continue to do well on such a program, many report this multiple hormone replacement approach gradually loses effectiveness over time. Those who are already in advanced stages of adrenal fatigue prior to beginning such program are particularly vulnerable. Over months or years, there is a slow but gradual loss of the positive clinical outcome as compared to the initial benefit. As time progresses, many return to their doctor for more help.
I’m so sorry about your previous miscarriages. Low progesterone is only one cause of a miscarriage – though I wish this were easier for me to answer. While I can’t offer you direct advice, I can tell you that when miscarriages are not understood, many doctors will opt to prescribe progesterone preventatively, in the hopes that it helps to maintain a pregnancy. Please let me know how things go. Warmly, Dr Julie

I have been battling with severe mood swings and depression for 7-8 yrs now. I have been on several antidepressants, seen counselors and nothing ever changes. I have gained so much weight and even with diet and exercise I can’t seem to lose it. All the weight is in my abdomen. I have been under chronic stress for all this time as well. I asked my GYN a few years ago about hormone testing and she told me it is a joke. She had put me back on a low estrogen pill and I take it continuously and only let myself get a period every 3 months. It is very light when it comes. Last year at my annual had I gained 20 more pounds and her response was “You look beautiful dear and I hate to tell you that as long as you have stress you will never lose weight.” I feel like I am going crazy, I have become suicidal and can’t seem to figure out what is wrong with me. I am switching to another GYN doctor who does do testing. I hope I can find some answers because I really feel like I can’t go on living like this.
Abnormal Cervical Mucus is a condition wherein the mucus lining the cervix and the uterus is not quite as it should be; the change in mucus consistency throughout the ovulation process is engineered mainly to aid in sperm journey and egg fertilization. Alteration in mucus consistency, with which the normal is thin and watery, becomes an obstruction for the sperm to reach the egg to ensure conception. With the low production of estrogen, the mucus becomes thick for sperm to pass or swim through. Specific reproductive glands are responsible for the secretion of proper mucus to line the cervix, and repeated infections and presence of sexually transmitted diseases are the common culprits of abnormal cervical mucus production.
I love this info and the podcast! My estrogen levels are normal and progesterone tested at 2 during luteal phase so my doctor put me on a low dose of bioidentical progesterone, and it’s really helped with PMS and libido and I’ve even started losing a little weight BUT I started having panic attacks and super high anxiety, which is not at all normal for me. I have Hashimotos but have normal thyroid levels and eat AIP. Any thoughts or suggestions would be super appreciated!!!

Stress causes the progesterone level in your body to drop sharply, so symptoms can come back. When you start supplementing, it is a good idea to meditate, let go of your negative reactions to people and circumstances around you, and try to avoid stressful situations. If you are stressed, increase the amount of cream until you are over the stressful time, then slowly reduce back down again.
Bioidentical. When we say bioidentical what we mean is that it is identical to the molecule that your ovaries made. It’s the same identical molecule, so your body thinks it’s the same. It’s really an antiaging hormone, if you think about it, because we age. You lose your hormones. If you want to have a better life as you mature and you age so you feel young, you want to make sure you replenish your hormones. This goes not only for females, but males as well.

I’m so sorry about your previous miscarriages. Low progesterone is only one cause of a miscarriage – though I wish this were easier for me to answer. While I can’t offer you direct advice, I can tell you that when miscarriages are not understood, many doctors will opt to prescribe progesterone preventatively, in the hopes that it helps to maintain a pregnancy. Please let me know how things go. Warmly, Dr Julie
Are you aware of any link between insufficient glandular tissue/breast hypoplasia and low progesterone? I’m wondering if my primary lactation failure after the birth of my daughter 2.5 years ago may be linked to a more recent miscarriage and my current struggle to conceive. Additionally, early in my first pregnancy my hcg levels were very slow to rise, in hindsight I believe my doctor was monitoring me for a loss, which, thankfully, didn’t happen. As I’m not struggling to get pregnant again I’ve been doing lots of reading and am wondering if all that’s things may be connected, and if low progesterone may be part of the problem. I also suffer from most of the symptoms you mentioned. I also think my luteal phase is too short, maybe between 8-10 days. 
Donielle believes women can learn how to heal their bodies & balance their hormones through natural methods. An advocate for natural health, she has a passion for nourishing/real food nutrition and natural living. Her personal background includes both infertility and miscarriage and she started Natural Fertility and Wellness in 2008 in order to share all of the information she found helpful in her journey to heal from PCOS and overcome infertility.
Case No. 3:  The limited mucus cycles, endometriosis, ovarian dysfunction and a husband with a very low sperm count were identified in this patient who had failed two previous IVF procedures.  In spite of these abnormalities, with proper NaProTECHNOLOGY treatment, she achieved a pregnancy and had a normal healthy baby (from Pope Paul VI Institute).
I’m 25 and ever since I started my period at 13 I’ve been dramatically irregular. Going two to three months without menstruation. I never had my progesterone levels checked. Then I had my first child and had severe postpartum depression. My doctor said that was most likely caused by a dramatic drop in progesterone. But since then, (and that was 2 1/2 years ago) I’ve had unexplained depression and anxiety. I am now pregnant again and just got diagnosed with low progesterone. Is it possible that I’ve had low progesterone most of my life, but flaring up when I had my first child? 
Progesterone is a calming hormone. It opposes estrogen. It is known as a lipophilic hormone. In other words, it ?loves fat? such as adipose tissues. It tends to stay in areas of the body where such tissue is prominent, such as the abdomen and organs. All steroid hormones love fat, including estrogen and testosterone. However, progesterone loves fat the most out of them all. When hormones are trapped in fat, the body can only metabolize a limited amout a day. One study reported that it took four months for women to clear half of the 42 mg per day dose they used for 40 days. Excessive progesterone therefore may lead to accumulation in the body. This accumulation can have negative effects.
Given that the body naturally produces progesterone during pregnancy anyway, and many of the supplements on the market have a chemical makeup identical to the progesterone produced in the body, many physicians feel that supplementing women who have low levels is unlikely to do any harm even if it doesn't help. They decide to go with the philosophy that if progesterone can't hurt and might help, they may as well prescribe it.

No one test result can determine is a woman has unhealthy amounts of progesterin. The hormone increases and decreases through numerous factors, such as age, test method, and the procedures of different labs. Also important is to know where the woman is in her menstrual cycle since the amount of the horome will change with the time of the month. There is more of the chemical when the egg is released from the ovary. The amount continues to rise if a pregnancy occurs or falls if menstruation begins. That's why serial measurements will be taken. Therefore, a woman will undergo numerous tests to determine what her cycle is doing.
The progesterone prescription products that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are LIKELY SAFE for most people when used by mouth, applied to the skin, applied into vagina, or injected into the muscle with the advice and care of a healthcare professional. However, progesterone can cause many side effects including stomach upset, changes in appetite, weight gain, fluid retention and swelling (edema), fatigue, acne, drowsiness or insomnia, allergic skin rashes, hives, fever, headache, depression, breast discomfort or enlargement, premenstrual syndrome (PMS)-like symptoms, altered menstrual cycles, irregular bleeding, and other side effects.
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