So, ladies and gentlemen, there you have it. To summarize our point: vaginal discharge is a normal physiological part of our bodies. It is important to know what’s normal for you so that if something changes, you know when to see a doctor. We encourage you to get the dialogue going and share your knowledge about vaginal discharge with your friends, family, and loved ones. The more you know, the healthier you are!

Although there isn't any conclusive scientific research proving that eating yogurt every day stops Candida albicans from every multiplying into an infection, a lot of women swear by it. If you want to look into it for yourself and see if yogurt helps keep your vagina happy, you can either treat yourself to a little cup of all-natural, unsweetened yogurt each day, or you can dip your tampon in a little yogurt before insertion during the middle of your period, to give your vagina an extra boost of yummy bacteria.
A: There are a lot of types of vaginal discharge. These types are grouped based on their color and consistency. A few types of vaginal discharge are normal, but others may be a sign of an underlying condition that needs to be treated. What the color signifies really depends on the situation. It’s hard to isolate the color alone, as even white discharge can be abnormal, depending on what else is happening with the patient. There’s no way to make a diagnosis based on the color alone, but you would have to take into account certain factors like a patient’s age, behaviors, menstrual cycle, and other symptoms. But basically, the colors can mean the following:
Vaginal discharge is a fluid or semisolid substance that flows out of the vaginal opening. Most women have vaginal discharge to some extent, and a small amount of vaginal discharge is a reflection of the body's normal cleansing process. The amount and type of vaginal discharge also varies among women and with the woman's menstrual cycle. A change in vaginal discharge (such as an abnormal odor or color or increase in amount), or the presence of vaginal discharge associated with irritation or other uncomfortable symptoms, can signal that an infection is present.
One of the most common symptoms of a yeast infection is a rash. This can actually have a number of different causes including a range of STIs so it is best to look for the other symptoms appearing alongside this. Interestingly, rashes don’t just affect women. Women can actually ‘give’ men a form of yeast infection, though it won’t cause the same symptoms or complications as it does in women.
When it comes to hormones, the female sex hormone progesterone can increase yeast infections in the vaginal area because it increases the production of glycogen, a natural starch that’s converted into sugar easily. Yeast can thrive off of these starch molecules, and because women have naturally higher progesterone levels than men, they’re more susceptible to yeast overgrowth.
Fortunately, most yeast infections are not serious. Left untreated, yeast infections will usually go away on their own, but the severe itching can be hard to tolerate for some. Fortunately, the infections respond well to over-the-counter antifungal creams or suppositories, so if you’re sure you have a yeast infection, go ahead and try an OTC yeast infection medication like Monistat or yeast arrest suppositories, which contain boric acid, a mild antiseptic. However, pregnant women should avoid boric acid.
A recurrent yeast infection occurs when a woman has four or more infections in one year that are not related to antibiotic use. Recurrent yeast infections may be related to an underlying medical condition such as impaired immunity and may require more aggressive treatment. This can include longer courses of topical treatments, oral medications, or a combination of the two.
Candida normally lives inside the body (in places such as the mouth, throat, gut, and vagina) and on skin without causing any problems. Scientists estimate that about 20% of women normally have Candida in the vagina without having any symptoms.2 Sometimes, Candida can multiply and cause an infection if the environment inside the vagina changes in a way that encourages its growth. This can happen because of hormones, medicines, or changes in the immune system.
Late reader to this blog post. Extremely interesting piece and I am so happy that someone has finally put out reliable information that was able to ease my anxiety at least a little. Since about November, I have noticed a white discharge, kinda thick, appearing more so than ever before. My automatic thought was a yeast infection, but there wasn’t any itching. My gyno diagnosed it as BV. I took the medication for about three months, and each time it went away for about a week, but then it went right back to the what it used to be. Very odd because I never used to discharge like this, it basically came out of nowhere. I got tested for everything and everything came back negative. I guess the only explanation is that my body chemistry changed and this is the new normal.

A recurrent yeast infection occurs when a woman has four or more infections in one year that are not related to antibiotic use. Recurrent yeast infections may be related to an underlying medical condition such as impaired immunity and may require more aggressive treatment. This can include longer courses of topical treatments, oral medications, or a combination of the two.


Yeast infections occur without sexual activity and, therefore, are not considered sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, yeast can be transferred between sexual partners through vaginal, oral, or anal sex. You can use a condom or dental dam to protect against this. If your sexual activity irritates the vagina, it can disrupt the normal balance and encourage an overgrowth of yeast.
A: There are a lot of types of vaginal discharge. These types are grouped based on their color and consistency. A few types of vaginal discharge are normal, but others may be a sign of an underlying condition that needs to be treated. What the color signifies really depends on the situation. It’s hard to isolate the color alone, as even white discharge can be abnormal, depending on what else is happening with the patient. There’s no way to make a diagnosis based on the color alone, but you would have to take into account certain factors like a patient’s age, behaviors, menstrual cycle, and other symptoms. But basically, the colors can mean the following:

In people who have a weakened immune system because of cancer treatments, steroids, or diseases such as AIDS, candida infections can occur throughout the entire body and can be life-threatening. The blood, brain, eye, kidney, and heart are most frequently affected, but Candida also can grow in the lungs, liver, and spleen. Candida is a leading cause of esophagitis (inflammation in the swallowing tube) in people with AIDS.


One housekeeping point. When I write posts like this I invariably get nasty comments from women or sometimes even doctors telling me I’m wrong/stupid/don’t know their body/asking if I am a real doctor. Those comments will not be accepted because it will be clear that you have not read the post, that you are rude, or both. The point of this post is to explain how everyone who thinks a chunky white = yeast has been duped.
Sexual activity – Many women report getting a yeast infection after sexual intercourse. If you can, it is best to clean your genitals after sex to get rid of any harmful bacteria. Men can also develop yeast infections in their genitals (although not usually as frequently as females). In these cases, sexual contact can transmit a yeast infection from one person to another. Be honest with your partner if you have a yeast infection and find ways avoid spreading the infection until your condition has improved.
The creamy, cottage cheese-like discharge common with yeast infections comes from lesions. In the mouth, they can occur on the tongue, tonsils, roof of the mouth or inner cheeks. The tongue may appear white. On the skin, lesions appear as small blisters around the infected area. The discharge from lesions of a vaginal yeast infection can be watery and white to thick and chunky.
Bacterial vaginosis is an abnormal vaginal condition with signs and symptoms of vaginal discharge, vaginal odor, and vaginal pain. Bacterial vaginosis results from an overgrowth of normal bacteria in the vagina. Although it may cause some disturbing symptoms (discharge and odor), it is not dangerous and cannot be passed by sex. Diagnosis becomes important to exclude serious infections like gonorrhea and Chlamydia. Many treatment options are available such as oral antibiotics and vaginal gels.
Burning while urinating can be an excruciating experience. Luckily, it’s less common among yeast infection symptoms, but it’s still something that patients may notice, says Megan Quimper, MD, an ob-gyn at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Urine can aggravate already raw, irritated tissues. Burning is a common symptom of a urinary tract infection, which also includes a persistent urge to go and cloudy urine, according to the Mayo Clinic. Talk to your doctor about what may be going on with you and brush up on these 9 symptoms of a UTI.
Q: This will be so helpful to our female readers! A lot of women feel uncomfortable discussing this with anyone, even the people closest to them. It isn’t the easiest topic to bring up in a casual conversation with friends. You could say “Hey, my throat is killing me, what should I take?” But it’s hard to casually say over a cup of coffee, “Hey, I have white discharge, do you know what that means?”
Vaginitis isn’t a sexually transmitted infection. But sometimes sexual activity can lead to vaginitis. Your partner’s natural genital chemistry can change the balance of yeast and bacteria in your vagina. In rare cases, you can have an allergic reaction to your partner’s semen. Friction from sex, or certain types of lubricants, condoms, and sex toys may also cause irritation. Read more about vaginitis and sex.
A sexy romp should leave you feeling a little flushed afterward, but if you feel a painful heat in your vagina during sex, it could signal a bigger problem. A burning sensation during intercourse, or a constant burning feeling in your vaginal area at any time, is a telltale sign of a yeast infection, Ghodsi says. This symptom isn’t one you should ignore as it could also be a sign of an STI or bacterial infection, so call your doctor right away, she adds.
Martinez, R. C. R., Franceschini, S. A., Patta, M. C., Quintana, S. M., Candido, R. C., Ferreira, J. C., . . . Reid, G. (2009, March). Improved treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis with fluconazole plus probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14. Letters in Applied Microbiology, 48(3), 269–274. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1472-765X.2008.02477.x/full
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