Probiotics are "good" bacteria that help regulate "bad" bacteria and fungus, such as yeast, inside the body. Yogurt contains lactobacilli, a healthy bacteria. When an infant is old enough to eat soft foods, a caregiver can offer a small serving of yogurt on a daily basis to help restore the infant's vaginal flora. The flora is the normal bacteria and fungal balance in the vagina. Ask a health care provider about using a probiotic drink or powder with an infant. These are available at health food stores and some pharmacies but the dosing amount should be determined by a qualified health care provider.

Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.
Yeast infections are caused by an imbalance in the vaginal flora (the natural bacteria in the vagina), and things that can cause that imbalance are changes in diet, medications you may be taking that wipe out natural bacteria in the vagina (like antibiotics), or other illnesses like diabetes and autoimmune disorders that raise your risk for infection. The most common antibiotics that tend to lead to a yeast infection are those used to treat urinary tract infections, though McHugh said that's likely because doctors just prescribe those antibiotics to women more often.
Candida overgrowth syndrome, or COS, is the term used when candida has grown out of control in your body. Make no mistake: This is a chronic health condition. In addition to candida symptoms, individuals who have never experienced a serious yeast infection can find they have developed new sensitivities, allergies or intolerances to a variety of foods. These foods include dairy, eggs, corn and gluten.
Remember: Do not use anti-yeast medications without seeing your health care provider, unless you’ve been diagnosed by an HCP more than once, so you’re really sure of the symptoms and signs. The medicine(s) that is prescribed for yeast infections will not cure other kinds of vaginal infections such as bacterial vaginosis or sexually transmitted infections (STIs). You would need another prescription medicine to treat the infection.
If you've had a yeast infection before and now have the same symptoms—vaginal discharge that has a yeast-like smell,with burning, itching and discomfort—self-treatment with an over-the-counter antifungal treatment is generally acceptable. However, many vaginal infections, including some that can cause serious reproductive health conditions, such as premature birth or increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases, have similar symptoms. If you're not sure, have never had a yeast infection before, are pregnant or have a health condition, consult a health care professional for an evaluation of your symptoms before treating yourself with OTC medications.
Diaper rashes decrease to the extent that diapered skin can have an environment closer to that of undiapered skin. The less time that infants wear diapers, the less the chance that they develop a diaper rash. However, the need to wear diapers must also be considered. Disposable diapers are associated with fewer cases of yeast diaper rash than are cloth diapers. Disposable diapers have absorbent gelling materials that draw moisture away from delicate skin surfaces. Infants who wear breathable disposable diapers developed significantly fewer diaper rashes of any type than infants who wore standard, non-breathable disposable diapers in a series of clinical trials.
Some people worry that using actual yeast infection medications will further upset the microbial balance in the vagina, leading to more discomfort. But Leena Nathan, M.D., an ob/gyn at UCLA Health, says this concern isn’t necessary because these drugs are only affecting your yeast overgrowth. “It's OK to go ahead and treat it and not worry about trading one [infection] for another,” she tells SELF. You might experience side effects such as a bit of burning or irritation, and if you choose vaginal suppositories they could weaken the latex in condoms (so use a different form of contraception if necessary)—but antifungals aren’t going to somehow create a different vaginal infection.

Diagnosis of a yeast infection is done either via microscopic examination or culturing. For identification by light microscopy, a scraping or swab of the affected area is placed on a microscope slide. A single drop of 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution is then added to the specimen. The KOH dissolves the skin cells, but leaves the Candida cells intact, permitting visualization of pseudohyphae and budding yeast cells typical of many Candida species.


When an infant develops a Candida infection, symptoms can include painful white or yellow patches on the tongue, lips, gums, palate (roof of mouth), and inner cheeks. It can also spread into the esophagus, causing pain when swallowing. Candidiasis can make a diaper rash worse, producing a reddening and sensitivity of the affected area and a raised red border in some cases. Teenaged girls who develop a yeast infection of the vagina and the surrounding area may have symptoms such as itching; pain and redness; a thick, “cheesy” vaginal discharge; and pain when urinating. Infection of the bloodstream occurs in children who are hospitalized or at home with intravenous catheters. A yeast infection often follows antibiotic therapy. Infections occur in children with cancer who are receiving chemotherapy. In these cases, the fungus in the gut gets into the blood system. Once in the blood, the yeast can travel throughout the body, causing infection of the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, brain, and skin. The early signs of infection are fever and blockage of the intravenous catheter.

The 2016 revision of the clinical practice guideline for the management of candidiasis lists a large number of specific treatment regimens for Candida infections that involve different Candida species, forms of antifungal drug resistance, immune statuses, and infection localization and severity.[15] Gastrointestinal candidiasis in immunocompetent individuals is treated with 100–200 mg fluconazole per day for 2–3 weeks.[23]
Take antibiotics only when prescribed by your health care professional and never take them for more or less time than directed. In addition to destroying bacteria that cause illness, antibiotics kill off the "good" bacteria that normally live in the vagina. Stopping treatment early, even when symptoms have improved, can cause infections to return and make them resistant to the medication.
As with any food, however, it’s always important to monitor how you feel after consuming a meal when you have candida. Some people who suffer stomach distress after eating any kind of starch, for instance, should avoid starchy vegetables like corn, peas, parsnips, potatoes, pumpkin, squash, zucchini and yams. Instead, they should eat non-starchy vegetables — typically the flowering parts of the plant — like lettuce, asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, cucumber, spinach, mushrooms, onions, peppers and tomatoes.
While it’s completely normal for your vagina to harbor some bacteria and yeast, certain factors can cause a fungus called Candida to grow out of control. This results in itching, burning, swelling, pain when you pee, and thick cottage cheese-like discharge—the telltale signs of a yeast infection. So it makes sense, then, that you’d want to do everything you can to get rid of one ASAP.
Vaginal yeast infections are typically treated with topical antifungal agents.[15] A one-time dose of fluconazole is 90% effective in treating a vaginal yeast infection.[56] For severe nonrecurring cases, several doses of fluconazole is recommended.[15] Local treatment may include vaginal suppositories or medicated douches. Other types of yeast infections require different dosing. Gentian violet can be used for thrush in breastfeeding babies. C. albicans can develop resistance to fluconazole, this being more of an issue in those with HIV/AIDS who are often treated with multiple courses of fluconazole for recurrent oral infections.[57]
Birth control and yeast infections: What's the link? Both hormonal and barrier methods of birth control can increase the risk of a yeast infection. Symptoms include itching, redness, and swelling around the genital area. Over-the-counter antifungal medication may help, but they can also decrease the effectiveness of birth control. Get some tips on how to avoid infection. Read now

A: It sounds like your baby may have a yeast infection diaper rash, which can happen if a mild diaper rash gets infected with yeast. This is especially likely if your baby recently took antibiotics. If your baby's had the rash for more than a few days and go-to diaper rash treatments (like Desitin or A+D ointment) haven't helped clear it, call your pediatrician. You'll probably need an anti-fungal cream (there are over-the-counter and prescription versions, but you shouldn't use them without your doctor's approval), which usually helps beat the rash quickly. Your baby should also be evaluated to make sure it isn't something more aggressive than diaper rash.
To diagnose your vaginal symptoms, your health care professional will perform a gynecological examination and check your vagina for inflammation and abnormal discharge. A sample of the vaginal discharge may be taken for laboratory examination under a microscope, or for a yeast culture, test to see if candida fungi grow under laboratory conditions. Looking under a microscope also helps rule out other causes of discharge such as BV or trichomoniasis, which require different treatment.
Your doctor or nurse can also give you a single dose of antifungal medicine taken by mouth, such as fluconazole (floo-CON-uh-zohl). If you get more than four vaginal yeast infections a year, or if your yeast infection doesn't go away after using over-the-counter treatment, you may need to take regular doses of antifungal medicine for up to six months.
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