The most common symptoms of a yeast infection are itching and vaginal discharge. The discharge is often thick, white and, curd-like (almost like cottage cheese). The discharge will be odorless. Other signs are burning, redness, and irritation of the vaginal area. Severe yeast infections may cause swelling of the labia (lips) outside of the vagina. Sometimes, women have pain when they pee as the urine passes over the sore tissues.
Applying plain yogurt to the area may help to restore balance and reduce irritation. Using only plain yogurt with active cultures, once or twice a day, rub a few tablespoons’ worth around the outside of the vagina to quell irritation, or insert the same amount into the vagina. You can also dip a tampon in the yogurt, let it soak for a few minutes, and then insert it.
Probiotics are "good" bacteria that help regulate "bad" bacteria and fungus, such as yeast, inside the body. Yogurt contains lactobacilli, a healthy bacteria. When an infant is old enough to eat soft foods, a caregiver can offer a small serving of yogurt on a daily basis to help restore the infant's vaginal flora. The flora is the normal bacteria and fungal balance in the vagina. Ask a health care provider about using a probiotic drink or powder with an infant. These are available at health food stores and some pharmacies but the dosing amount should be determined by a qualified health care provider.

Thrush is usually whitish oral, velvety lesions that appear on the tongue and mouth. Underneath the whitish material lies the red tissue which bleeds easily. The size and number of lesions can increase slowly in untreated cases. Thrush may be widespread (to involve large parts of tongue, mouth’s roof and inside of cheeks) and may mimic oral ulcers. These white patches cannot be rubbed off like bits of milk.
When my son had oral yeast (thrush) and several weeks of Nystatin did nothing for it, we used Gentian Violet, which is cheap ($3/bottle) and available at most drug stores, and it cured him in two days. You only need a drop or two. If your daughter's diaper rash is indeed yeast (which it might not be), perhaps Gentian Violet would help. Note that it stains everything it touches bright purple, so be prepared with some clothes you don't care about! Purple and Yeast-Free
Mostly, eat fresh, organic vegetables that have been steamed. For this cleanse stage, keep away from any starchy vegetables like carrots, radishes, beets, sweet potatoes and white potatoes, which may contribute to sugar levels and feed the candida. Continue to drink plenty of pure water, a minimum of 72 ounces per day, to help flush the candida and byproducts from your system.
Oral thrush is another common type of yeast infection that occurs frequently in babies, especially during the first 6 to 12 months of life. This yeast infection appears as white or yellowish patches in a baby’s mouth. They may appear on the tongue, gums, roof of the mouth or the inside of the cheeks. Patches caused by a yeast infection in the mouth cannot be wiped away easily, unlike formula or breast milk that may coat the tongue. With thrush, bleeding may occur if the patches are wiped off. A baby may experience some discomfort or difficulty eating as a result of oral thrush, leading to poor feeding or fussiness during feeding. An antifungal solution may be prescribed to treat oral thrush.

It can be hard to tell if this is the problem because the patches in her mouth can be very small and the only symptom thrush nipples have had for me is that they get dry. She was prescribed nystatin suspension drops and I put Lotrimin on my nipples. We have been fighting thrush for a while, now, as it is VERY hard to get rid of. If my nipples are dry, I know that it has spread to me. You have to boil EVERYTHING that comes into contact with the baby's mouth. We use clothe diapers, and she hasn't gotten any more diaper rashes since I started using Lotrimin on her bum. I still don't know if we've gotten rid of the thrush, but we are still in treatment mode and I'm boiling everything AGAIN... Anonymous

Another possibility: Your “yeast infection” is persisting because it’s actually a different condition, such as bacterial vaginosis or trichomoniasis. This is why it’s especially important to prioritize heading to the doctor ASAP if you’re pregnant and your self-treated yeast infection comes back. Some issues that can masquerade as yeast infections can be dangerous during pregnancy. For example, bacterial vaginosis can increase the risk of preterm labor, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


A yeast diaper rash is a common  rash that develops on the bums of babies and young toddlers. “It’s very normal in infants and toddlers,” says Natasha Burgert, MD, FAAP, pediatrician at Pediatrics Associates in Kansas City, Missouri. “Yeast is a fungus that lives on your skin and in the intestines, and when you have a warm, moist environment in the diaper area, it can cause a bit of a rash.”

How to Know If a Baby Has a Yeast Rash How to Treat Itchy Skin on Babies Different Types of Diaper Rashes in Baby Girls How to Get Rid of Your Baby's Severely Dry Skin Can Home Remedies Be Used for Yeast Infections During Pregnancy? Antibiotics & Stomach Cramps in a Baby Can Antibiotics Cause a Rash on My Baby? Blotchy Skin Rash on a Baby's Face How to Tell If You Need a Probiotic Folic Acid Deficiency in Babies Nystatin Side Effects for Infants Symptoms of Candida Fungi in the Lungs Recurring Yeast Infections in Toddlers Scalp Rash With Red Raised Skin on Babies Dry, Crusty Skin on the Eyebrows of Babies Rapid Breathing in Newborns Effects of Food Poisoning While Pregnant Staph Infection Symptoms in Infants How to Use Apple Cider Vinegar for Oral Thrush The Differences Between Baby Acne and Milia

Despite the lack of evidence, wearing cotton underwear and loose fitting clothing is often recommended as a preventative measure.[1][2] Avoiding douching and scented hygiene products is also recommended.[1] Treatment is with an antifungal medication.[4] This may be either as a cream such as clotrimazole or with oral medications such as fluconazole.[4] Probiotics have not been found to be useful for active infections.[6]
Your vagina likes to be in balance. If you get an overgrowth of the fungus candida down there, you may get a yeast infection. It’s incredibly common—three-quarters of women will get saddled with one in their lifetime—but pregnancy, uncontrolled diabetes, hormonal birth control, douching or using other vaginal cleansing products, and taking antibiotics can make you more susceptible to them, according to the federal Office on Women’s Health.
First and foremost, if you're a nursing mom, squirt that breast milk on baby's butt! Whether straight from the tap, or if you'd rather pump and get it on there some other way, those antibodies even help kill bacteria topically (great for ear infections, cuts, sinuses, all sorts of things!). I know it seems really super-weird, but I swear, it's helpful.
The fungus Candida is normally found on and in the body in small amounts. It is present on the skin and in the mouth, as well as in the intestinal tract and genital area. Most of the time, Candida does not cause any symptoms. When these organisms overgrow, they can cause infections (candidiasis), which sometimes can become chronic. If the fungus enters the bloodstream, the infection can spread to other parts of the body. Bloodstream infections are most common in newborns, children with long-term intravenous catheters, and children with weakened immune systems caused by illnesses or medicines.
A vaginal yeast infection, which is also sometimes called vulvovaginal candidiasis, happens when the healthy yeast that normally lives in your vagina grows out of control. It often leads to itching and other irritating symptoms. The medical name for a yeast infection is "candidiasis," because they’re usually caused by a type of yeast called candida.
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