You can ask your physician for a prescription for Diflucan (fluconazole) if you'd prefer taking a single oral dose of medication over using a vaginal cream or suppository. The drug is appropriate for uncomplicated cases and had only mild to moderate side effects—including headache, dizziness, diarrhea, heartburn, and stomach pain—in clinical trials. However, oral fluconazole should not be taken if you are pregnant, as it can cause birth defects.
It’s no wonder why you might not want to head to the doctor to treat a yeast infection. Waiting to see the doctor can extend your itchy vagina experience, and actually following through with the appointment can be time-consuming. Plus, isn’t that the entire point of all those at-home yeast infection treatments at the drugstore? We spoke with ob/gyns to find out: When the going gets cottage cheesy, is it OK to just treat a yeast infection at home?
Candidiasis can affect the skin, mucous membranes (eg, mouth, throat), fingernails, eyes, and skin folds of the neck and armpits, as well as the diaper region (eg, vagina, folds of the groin). The oral infection, called thrush, frequently occurs in infants and toddlers. If Candida infections become chronic or occur in the mouth of older children, they may be a sign of an immune deficiency, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Very low birth weight babies are susceptible to candidiasis as well. Newborns can acquire the infection from their mothers, not only while they’re still in the uterus, but also during passage through the vagina during birth. Most of these infections are caused by Candida albicans, a yeast-like fungus, although other species of Candida are sometimes responsible. In some cases, children can develop candidiasis after being treated with antibacterials.

A systemic yeast infection refers to invasion into the bloodstream with subsequent spread throughout the body. This type of yeast infection is very rare in babies, typically occurring only in those who have existing health problems. Infants who are born prematurely or with a low birth weight, have a weakened immune system or who are already hospitalized for another reason are at increased risk. Other risk factors include bladder catheterization and long-term antibiotic or chemotherapy treatment. Signs and symptoms may include a low or high temperature, poor feeding, irregular breathing and low blood pressure. Although rare, systemic yeast infections are very serious. They are a major cause of death in settings such as the neonatal intensive care unit, according to a March 2011 article in "Early Human Development."
Boric acid. Boric acid — a vaginal insert (suppository) available by prescription — may be considered to help treat chronic, less common strains of candida and candida that are resistant to azole medications. Treatment is only vaginal and is applied twice daily for two weeks. However, boric acid can irritate your skin and can be fatal if accidentally ingested, especially by children.
The fungus candida causes a vaginal yeast infection. Your vagina naturally contains a balanced mix of yeast, including candida, and bacteria. Lactobacillus bacteria produce acid, which prevents yeast overgrowth. That balance can be disrupted and lead to a yeast infection. Too much yeast in your vagina causes vaginal itching, burning and other classic signs and symptoms of a yeast infection.
A girl usually notices certain things if she has a vaginal yeast infection. She may have itching and irritation in the vagina; swelling and irritation of the vulva (the folds of skin outside the vagina); pain or burning when peeing or having sex; or thick, white vaginal discharge that looks a bit like cottage cheese. Some girls will have several of these symptoms; others may only notice one or two.
The MONISTAT® 7 suite of products is the original prescription formula (100 mg of miconazole nitrate per dose), with smaller doses of the active ingredient evenly distributed throughout the week at bedtime. MONISTAT® 7 meets CDC Treatment Guidelines for pregnant women and is appropriate for women with diabetes. (Consult a healthcare professional before use.) Use as directed.
×