It could infect your partner – Choosing to opt out of treatment when you have a sexual partner can cause problems for both of you. Yeast infections can be transmitted back and forth through genital contact. Without treatment and with continued sexual contact, your partner may develop a yeast infection. The infection may continue to be transmitted until one of you seeks treatment.
Candida species can be present in healthy women in the vagina without causing any symptoms. In fact, it is estimated that 20% to 50% of women have Candida already present in the vagina. For an infection to occur, the normal balance of yeast and bacteria is disturbed, allowing overgrowth of the yeast. While yeast can be spread by sexual contact, vaginal yeast infection is not considered to be a sexually-transmitted disease because it can also occur in women who are not sexually active, due to the fact that yeast can be present in the vagina of healthy women.
You may be trying to treat an infection that is not a yeast infection. Studies show that two out of three women who buy yeast infection medicine don't really have a yeast infection.2 Instead, they may have an STI or bacterial vaginosis (BV). STIs and BV require different treatments than yeast infections and, if left untreated, can cause serious health problems.
Remember: Do not use anti-yeast medications without seeing your health care provider, unless you’ve been diagnosed by an HCP more than once, so you’re really sure of the symptoms and signs. The medicine(s) that is prescribed for yeast infections will not cure other kinds of vaginal infections such as bacterial vaginosis or sexually transmitted infections (STIs). You would need another prescription medicine to treat the infection.
The fungus Candida is normally found on and in the body in small amounts. It is present on the skin and in the mouth, as well as in the intestinal tract and genital area. Most of the time, Candida does not cause any symptoms. When these organisms overgrow, they can cause infections (candidiasis), which sometimes can become chronic. If the fungus enters the bloodstream, the infection can spread to other parts of the body. Bloodstream infections are most common in newborns, children with long-term intravenous catheters, and children with weakened immune systems caused by illnesses or medicines.
A: It sounds like your baby may have a yeast infection diaper rash, which can happen if a mild diaper rash gets infected with yeast. This is especially likely if your baby recently took antibiotics. If your baby's had the rash for more than a few days and go-to diaper rash treatments (like Desitin or A+D ointment) haven't helped clear it, call your pediatrician. You'll probably need an anti-fungal cream (there are over-the-counter and prescription versions, but you shouldn't use them without your doctor's approval), which usually helps beat the rash quickly. Your baby should also be evaluated to make sure it isn't something more aggressive than diaper rash.
The symptoms all boil down to this: Yeast can be irritating to the sensitive mucus membranes of your vagina and labia. That can cause burning, itching, and all of the other symptoms, Dr. Schaffir says. And, since the tissue in your vagina and labia becomes irritated and sore from a yeast infection, it can make sex and peeing painful, too. The unique discharge is caused by Candida, Dr. Wider says, but not every woman with a yeast infection experiences it.
Vaginal yeast infection, also known as candidal vulvovaginitis and vaginal thrush, is excessive growth of yeast in the vagina that results in irritation.[5][1] The most common symptom is vaginal itching, which may be severe.[1] Other symptoms include burning with urination, white and thick vaginal discharge that typically does not smell bad, pain with sex, and redness around the vagina.[1] Symptoms often worsen just before a woman's period.[2]

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You may not need to take your baby to the doctor in order to treat yeast diaper rash. In many cases, such infections can be cleared up with the simple application of some over-the-counter topical treatments. Three easy-to-find anti-fungal creams are Mycostatin (nystatin), Lotrimin (clotrimazole), and Monistat-Derm (miconazole micatin). Ask your pediatrician if she has a preference if you aren't sure which to use. 
If you've had a yeast infection before and now have the same symptoms—vaginal discharge that has a yeast-like smell,with burning, itching and discomfort—self-treatment with an over-the-counter antifungal treatment is generally acceptable. However, many vaginal infections, including some that can cause serious reproductive health conditions, such as premature birth or increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases, have similar symptoms. If you're not sure, have never had a yeast infection before, are pregnant or have a health condition, consult a health care professional for an evaluation of your symptoms before treating yourself with OTC medications.
If your infant is extra fussy during feedings and you notice white patches in her mouth, she may have an oral yeast infection known as thrush. You've probably experienced a vaginal yeast infection at some point in your life, so you can imagine the discomfort your little one is feeling. What exactly is thrush, and how can you help your baby feel better? Here’s the deal.

Vaginal candidiasis is usually treated with antifungal medicine.3 For most infections, the treatment is an antifungal medicine applied inside the vagina or a single dose of fluconazole taken by mouth. For more severe infections, infections that don’t get better, or keep coming back after getting better, other treatments might be needed. These treatments include more doses of fluconazole taken by mouth or other medicines applied inside the vagina such as boric acid, nystatin, or flucytosine.

This fungal overgrowth can happen for many reasons. Things that increase your estrogen, such as pregnancy, combined hormonal contraceptives, and hormone therapy, can raise the glycogen (a type of sugar) in the vagina. Wouldn’t you know it: Yeast happen to love sugar. Uncontrolled diabetes can also contribute, due to the excess sugar circulating in your blood. Antibiotics that disrupt the balance of Lactobacillus bacteria, which can prevent yeast overgrowth, are another factor, according to the Mayo Clinic. There are also lifestyle-related reasons, like spending too much time in damp workout clothing or swimwear, or wearing non-cotton underwear that doesn’t allow for much airflow.

To reduce the risk of candidiasis in your baby’s diaper area, keep the skin as clean and dry as possible, changing diapers frequently. Fungal infections (thrush or vaginitis) often follow courses of antibacterials. To avoid this, it is important to use antibiotics only when  necessary. Oral nystatin and fluconazole are often used to prevent candidiasis in children with weakened immune systems.
Vaginal yeast infections are due to excessive growth of Candida.[1] These yeast are normally present in the vagina in small numbers.[1] It is not classified as a sexually transmitted infection; however, it may occur more often in those who are frequently sexually active.[1][2] Risk factors include taking antibiotics, pregnancy, diabetes, and HIV/AIDS.[2] Eating a diet high in simple sugar may also play a role.[1] Tight clothing, type of underwear, and personal hygiene do not appear to be factors.[2] Diagnosis is by testing a sample of vaginal discharge.[1] As symptoms are similar to that of the sexually transmitted infections, chlamydia and gonorrhea, testing may be recommended.[1]
Candida is a fungus that aids with nutrient absorption and digestion when in proper levels in the body. When it overproduces, typical candida symptoms may appear. In the digestive tract, if left unchecked, it breaks down the walls of the intestinal lining and penetrates into the bloodstream. This releases byproduct toxins and other toxins from your system, causing leaky gut syndrome.
Because yeast can be present normally in the vagina of healthy women, not all yeast infections can be prevented. However, it is possible to take preventive measures that may reduce your risk of getting a yeast infection. These include always cleaning the genital area from front to back and changing out of wet bathing suits or damp clothes as soon as possible. Wearing loose-fitting cotton underwear can help reduce moisture and prevent yeast infections. Since chemical irritants can influence the balance of bacteria in the vagina, avoiding products with potential irritants like douches or scented tampons can also help. Regular baths or showers are an adequate way to cleanse the vagina, and douching is not recommended and may actually increase your risk of yeast infection.
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